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El Salvador Culture

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1995
When Adalia Zelada's parents left El Salvador in the 1970s, they never imagined that their daughter would go there one day as anything but a tourist. But last week, the UCLA freshman joined 12 other college students who are studying social and economic issues in El Salvador. The summer program is sponsored by the Central American Resource Center in Pico-Union. Like Zelada, most of the students are Los Angeles residents of Salvadoran descent.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2000 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their war-torn country bears the name of the Savior, El Salvador. For the more than 700,000 Salvadorans in Southern California, the sacred image of Jesus Christ, Divine Savior of the World, standing with outstretched arms, has served as a patron saint for their country. It was he, the immigrants say, who helped them escape the bloodshed of civil war and settle in the United States.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2000 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their war-torn country bears the name of the Savior, El Salvador. For the more than 700,000 Salvadorans in Southern California, the sacred image of Jesus Christ, Divine Savior of the World, standing with outstretched arms, has served as a patron saint for their country. It was he, the immigrants say, who helped them escape the bloodshed of civil war and settle in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1995
When Adalia Zelada's parents left El Salvador in the 1970s, they never imagined that their daughter would go there one day as anything but a tourist. But last week, the UCLA freshman joined 12 other college students who are studying social and economic issues in El Salvador. The summer program is sponsored by the Central American Resource Center in Pico-Union. Like Zelada, most of the students are Los Angeles residents of Salvadoran descent.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
During El Salvador's civil war in the 1980s, this town was at the heart of a perilous battle zone, washed over by government soldiers one day, leftist guerrillas the next. The upheaval made Suchitoto an unhappy emblem of the conflict and heightened its isolation in the countryside, where economic progress has been elusive. The war is long over, but not the languor. Yet a project is afoot to invigorate Suchitoto, pushed by an unlikely crowd: theater aficionados. These boosters see theater as a spark for growth and desperately needed jobs — altering the face of their town with a little more "Our Town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2007 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
They came with no English, little money and a shellshocked psyche engraved with the memories of a savage civil war in their native El Salvador. Now, more than 25 years later, Mario Fuentes, Werner Marroquin and Salvador Gomez Gochez have joined the U.S. mainstream middle class as citizens, homeowners, fluent English-speakers and labor and community organizers.
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