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El Salvador Immigration

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Immigrant-rights activists Friday warned Orange County's estimated 70,000 Salvadorans that applying for the "safe haven" provision of a new immigration law could place them at risk of deportation. The law, which took effect Jan. 1, will provide 18 months of legal status for Salvadorans who can prove that they have lived here continually since Sept. 19, 1990. The change in the law marks a significant reversal in U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Immigrant-rights activists Friday warned Orange County's estimated 70,000 Salvadorans that applying for the "safe haven" provision of a new immigration law could place them at risk of deportation. The law, which took effect Jan. 1, will provide 18 months of legal status for Salvadorans who can prove that they have lived here continually since Sept. 19, 1990. The change in the law marks a significant reversal in U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2006 | Arin Gencer, Times Staff Writer
Concerned about low registration numbers, U.S. immigration officials are urging Hondurans and Nicaraguans who qualify for temporary legal status to apply for an extension before the June 1 deadline. Fewer than 20% of the 79,000 people granted protected status after Hurricane Mitch devastated the two Central American countries eight years ago have filed the forms necessary to legally remain in the United States, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1988
The position taken in your editorial "American Sanctuary" (April 8), advocating passage of the Moakley-DeConcini legislation granting extended voluntary departure to El Salvadorans and Nicaraguans illegally in this country is wrong. The proposed ill-founded legislation would attract additional illegal entrants and undermine the comprehensive and orderly system created by the Refugee Act of 1980 and the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA). For many reasons, including the legalization (amnesty)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1985 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Despite a federal crackdown on similar efforts by ministers and churches in Arizona, student groups on three University of California campuses have formed "sanctuaries" to help Guatemalan and Salvadoran refugees who are in the United States illegally.
NEWS
January 28, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After scores of anonymous towns on a pockmarked coastal highway, the entrance to this spot is unmistakable: Cars turn off the pitted federal road and glide over a patterned brick avenue that could be a country club drive, past a high red-white-and-blue sign that reads--in English--"Welcome to Intipuca City." The street, with curbs and gutters, leads to a community of freshly painted concrete-block houses, many two stories high.
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