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El Salvador Population

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NEWS
June 15, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a site of retching foulness where cows, children and vultures stand side by side, wrenching survival from a mountain of rotting animal corpses and human waste. Where flowering trees once sheltered flocks of fabulously colored birds that drank from clear, flowing rivers, a seemingly endless stream of trucks now disgorges cargoes of poisonous trash. No trees grow here. Streams are clogged with garbage and the eroded silt of barren, chemical-ridden soil.
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NEWS
June 15, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a site of retching foulness where cows, children and vultures stand side by side, wrenching survival from a mountain of rotting animal corpses and human waste. Where flowering trees once sheltered flocks of fabulously colored birds that drank from clear, flowing rivers, a seemingly endless stream of trucks now disgorges cargoes of poisonous trash. No trees grow here. Streams are clogged with garbage and the eroded silt of barren, chemical-ridden soil.
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NEWS
May 30, 1986
The New York-based human rights organization Americas Watch said that killings or disappearances linked to politics in El Salvador last year numbered nearly 2,000, a figure it said was relatively low compared to some previous years. It said U.S.-trained armed forces and rightist death squads were responsible for 1,740 killings or disappearances. It blamed leftist guerrillas for 173 such incidents.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Jose Napoleon Duarte today handed over power to his successor, rightist businessman Alfredo Cristiani, while Marxist rebels stepped up their campaign and threatened to make the country "ungovernable." It was the first transfer of power from one elected head of state to another in El Salvador. Soldiers patrolled the capital and roads were deserted after guerrillas ordered a ban on transportation and set off bombs to protest the inauguration of Cristiani. His political party is blamed for poor living conditions of the peasants who make up most of El Salvador's population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1988
White House officials, and the presidential campaign of Vice President George Bush, like to describe the civil war in El Salvador as being on the verge of a successful resolution in favor of the U.S.-backed government of President Jose Napoleon Duarte. But reports from that country are rarely so upbeat. Now even the seriously ill Duarte has come forward with a divergent view. In a letter to Senate Majority Leader Robert C.
OPINION
March 17, 2009
For anyone who witnessed the horror show of El Salvador's 12-year civil war, the ballot-box victory of former leftist guerrillas there on Sunday was a stunning development. Though it took another 17 years after the war ended, the country now joins Northern Ireland in demonstrating that it is possible for a rebel group to effect political change and assume power through peaceful means. That's a gratifying development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1995 | TOM HAYDEN, State Sen. Tom Hayden is a Democrat who represents parts of West Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley.
A Mayan ruin called Ux Benka in Belize has an obscenity scrawled on its 1,500-year-old face, signed "Bloods." I had escaped Los Angeles to visit these ancient sites, but it seems you can't get away from L.A. and the issues of gangs, crime and immigration, no matter where you are. Belize is the least-populated place in Central America. With about 225,000 residents in an area twice the size of Los Angeles County, it sits peacefully on the Caribbean, bordered by Mexico and Guatemala.
NEWS
March 15, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosalinda watched disdainfully as some of her fellow street vendors hung red, white and blue balloons and crepe-paper streamers for Mayor Mario Valiente's visit to this capital's deteriorating downtown. "He's campaigning for reelection, so he'll come down here and hug all the drunks and kiss the sweaty market ladies," said the clothing merchant, who asked that her last name not be used. "But when you need something and go down to City Hall, no one will see you."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1994 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The future took an uncertain turn Friday for Elena Subialdea and other Salvadoran expatriates in Orange County, when U.S. immigration officials announced the lifting of special deferments from deportation for El Salvador nationals at the end of the month. Like others who heard the news from a radio broadcast or friend, Subialdea reacted with shock and confusion.
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
WHEN HE STEPPED OFF A PLANE IN EL SALVADOR IN JULY, leading a delegation of bank officials and economists, Carlos Vaquerano had finally come full circle since fleeing the war-torn country 13 years earlier. Vaquerano, like tens of thousands of other Salvadoran refugees during the 1980s, arrived in Los Angeles to face an uncertain future. He had no idea how long his country's civil war would last, or whether he would ever be able to return.
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