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El Salvador Revolts

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March 29, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, Marjorie Miller is The Times' Mexico City bureau chief; her last magazine story was a profile of Mexican mogul Emilio Azcarraga.
JAIME HILL GIVES A SHORT, amused laugh as he recalls the first time he met Ana Guadalupe Martinez in 1979. He was a prisoner of the guerrillas, locked in a closet-sized cell while the rebels negotiated his release for a ransom that would top $3 million. Martinez, dressed in olive-drab fatigues, was a leader of the incipient guerrilla force that was trying to finance a revolution against the Salvadoran oligarchy--people like Hill.
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NEWS
March 6, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, the search for Joaquin Villalobos required a bone-grinding jeep trip past hostile army checkpoints, across a mined riverbed and into the rough mountains of El Salvador. Even that might come to naught if one of Latin America's ablest and most ruthless guerrilla leaders refused to show his face to outsiders, as he often did for years at a time.
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NEWS
March 9, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Vice President Dan Quayle's trip here last month to demand that the government end human rights violations or face the loss of American aid has had almost no impact, with the number of killings actually increasing since his visit, according to diplomats and human rights groups. In the month before the vice president's February trip, the number of civilian deaths attributed to death squads and the military was eight. However, since Feb.
NEWS
April 25, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING and DIEGO ALEMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Friends and colleagues have taken steps this week to reopen the investigation into the 1989 murders here of six Jesuit priests--a highly publicized, brutal act that caused the United States to reexamine its long, costly involvement in Central American civil wars.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. military autopsies show conclusively that two American soldiers were "murdered in cold blood . . . executed" by Salvadoran guerrillas after they had survived a crash-landing of their helicopter, U.S. Ambassador William G. Walker said Saturday.
NEWS
January 27, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
A military appeals court Tuesday ordered the release of three prisoners accused of shooting to death four U.S. Marines and nine civilians at an outdoor cafe in 1985. The tribunal upheld a decision by a lower military court pardoning the men under a sweeping amnesty law on political crimes. The three have never been brought to trial for the killings, for which a leftist guerrilla faction claimed responsibility. Tuesday's decision apparently will cost the Salvadoran government $18.5 million in U.
NEWS
February 14, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Leftist guerrillas engaged in prolonged, heavy combat with government troops in El Salvador's eastern province of Morazan on Friday, leaving at least eight soldiers dead and 12 wounded, military officials said. The attack on troops in Delicias de Concepcion, 118 miles east of the capital, was the latest action in a rebel offensive launched at the beginning of the year with a similar assault on military positions to the north in Osicala.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
A Salvadoran army call for a cease-fire in the country's nine-year civil war was answered Wednesday by Marxist guerrilla bombs, bullets and hard words. Within hours after the army had said it was suspending all offensive operations as of midnight Tuesday until June 1, units of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front struck at several military and civilian targets.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | JACK MILES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an address last Friday to a hastily assembled group of priests and rabbis at St. Nicholas Episcopal Church in Encino, the best-known of the surviving Jesuits of El Salvador provided grim, previously unreported details about the murders that may have changed the course of the war in El Salvador.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A right-wing politician who was a former president of the Salvadoran Supreme Court was gunned down in his car at a busy intersection Tuesday. Francisco Jose Guerrero, 64, a leader of the conservative National Conciliation Party, was ambushed at mid-morning and shot in the chest, according to army and hospital officials. He died minutes later at a local hospital.
NEWS
April 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Salvadoran troops convicted of killing four American churchwomen in 1980 now say they were carrying out orders from superiors, a human rights group said Friday. The State Department called on the Salvadoran government to vigorously pursue any new evidence in the 18-year-old case.
NEWS
September 6, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two decades after his death, Roque Dalton, one of El Salvador's best-known poets and revolutionaries, is once again calling his countrymen's attention to the violence and poverty that caused a 12-year civil war--and which still exist.
NEWS
March 18, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this decade's first favorable election showing for Central American leftists, Salvadoran guerrillas-turned-politicians took control of the country's major city halls and positioned themselves to vie with the extreme right wing for control of the Legislative Assembly.
NEWS
March 17, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years of peace have done little to restore prosperity to La Palma, a crafts and vacation center that was cut off from the rest of the country during 12 years of civil war. The rutted highway, damaged during the strife, has not been repaved, and the Labor Ministry recreation center that once drew weekenders has not reopened.
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly four years after the signing of a peace agreement to end more than a decade of civil war, the government today missed its deadline for completing the reforms promised in the treaty, according to the U.N. mission overseeing implementation. The U.N.
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Five hundred army veterans from El Salvador's civil war seized control of the legislature for 24 hours before reaching agreement with the government on a number of demands. The former soldiers had kept control of the Legislative Assembly, trapping 13 lawmakers. One veteran was killed and three more were wounded in clashes with the police. Details of the agreement ending the occupation were not revealed, but the protesters had earlier demanded jobs, housing and financial aid.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tense and tired, with weapons in hand, 12 U.S. Army Green Berets raced from a luxury hotel tower Wednesday, 28 hours after leftist guerrillas trapped them inside. They said the rebels who had occupied the Sheraton Hotel escaped Tuesday evening while church and relief workers evacuated 17 civilians from other floors of the hotel's VIP tower. "They slipped out the back," one soldier said. "They slipped down the stairwell, went out back and jumped over the wall."
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The United States will challenge the Soviet Union this week over what U.S. officials charge is an unkept promise by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to stop arms deliveries to Nicaragua, aides said Sunday. Gorbachev told President Bush in a letter in May that the Soviet Union had responded to U.S. complaints by cutting off its supply of weaponry to Nicaragua's Marxist regime. But officials traveling to Mexico with Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With great fanfare and even a few tears, El Salvador's leftist guerrillas six months ago turned in their weapons and formed a legal political party as part of landmark peace accords that ended this country's savage civil war. Now the former guerrillas stand accused of having deliberately lied when they said they were disarming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although El Salvador's bloody civil war is over, mass deportations of Salvadorans in the United States would undermine a delicate peace and subject returning expatriates to hardship and danger, activists said Tuesday. Activists--including two Los Angeles-area congressional representatives and an official of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles--delivered their message during a news conference outside the federal building in downtown Los Angeles.
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