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El Salvador Revolts

NEWS
November 11, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, worried that a wave of apparent death squad slayings in El Salvador could burden it with another troublesome Third World crisis, sent a top official Wednesday to ask Salvadoran rightists to stop assassinating their political opponents. "This could be a disaster--another Haiti, Bosnia, Somalia," one senior official said. "If El Salvador falls apart, it's worse than the others. At least we could say we inherited the other problems from the (George) Bush Administration.
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NEWS
October 28, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under intense pressure to fully investigate the death-squad-style assassination of a leftist leader, President Alfredo Cristiani pledged Wednesday in a private meeting with former guerrilla commanders to "find the whole truth" behind a surge in political violence.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With great fanfare and even a few tears, El Salvador's leftist guerrillas six months ago turned in their weapons and formed a legal political party as part of landmark peace accords that ended this country's savage civil war. Now the former guerrillas stand accused of having deliberately lied when they said they were disarming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although El Salvador's bloody civil war is over, mass deportations of Salvadorans in the United States would undermine a delicate peace and subject returning expatriates to hardship and danger, activists said Tuesday. Activists--including two Los Angeles-area congressional representatives and an official of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles--delivered their message during a news conference outside the federal building in downtown Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Salvadoran Supreme Court rejected Friday the findings of a report on human rights violations that recommended, among other things, the removal of the justices. The court disputed the Truth Commission's finding that the judges obstructed investigations into some of the rights violations during the past decade, when the U.S.-backed Salvadoran government battled leftist guerrillas.
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration may try to thwart El Salvador's controversial new amnesty law by bringing its military officers to trial in American courts for human rights abuses committed during the Central American country's bloody 11-year civil war, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Thursday. In testimony to a House Appropriations subcommittee, he also said he is determined to ensure that the State Department will never mislead Congress about atrocities committed by friendly countries.
NEWS
March 23, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When army officers accused of the 1989 killings of six Jesuit priests were finally brought to trial two years ago, many Salvadorans applauded the event as a sign that justice would be served. It was rare for a murder case to actually reach a court; rarer still for a military man to face judgment for crimes against civilians.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The release this week of a United Nations report on human rights abuses in El Salvador has resurrected the decade-long debate over U.S. aid to that country and prompted Democratic calls for a thorough investigation of American involvement in one of Central America's bloodiest civil wars. Outraged by the findings of the U.N.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Even while pleading for a climate of forgiveness, the U.N. Truth Commission on El Salvador called Monday for the dismissal of all military officers and government officials cited for human rights violations and proposed that all violators, including rebel officers, be banned from taking part in Salvadoran public and political life for at least 10 years. These provisions, which have already led Defense Minister Gen.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The watershed U.N-sponsored investigation into the brutalities of El Salvador's civil war paints a chilling picture of organized, systematic violence conducted by a network of military officials and right-wing death squads bent on destroying any and all enemies.
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