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El Salvador Revolts

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although El Salvador's bloody civil war is over, mass deportations of Salvadorans in the United States would undermine a delicate peace and subject returning expatriates to hardship and danger, activists said Tuesday. Activists--including two Los Angeles-area congressional representatives and an official of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles--delivered their message during a news conference outside the federal building in downtown Los Angeles.
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NEWS
March 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Salvadoran Supreme Court rejected Friday the findings of a report on human rights violations that recommended, among other things, the removal of the justices. The court disputed the Truth Commission's finding that the judges obstructed investigations into some of the rights violations during the past decade, when the U.S.-backed Salvadoran government battled leftist guerrillas.
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration may try to thwart El Salvador's controversial new amnesty law by bringing its military officers to trial in American courts for human rights abuses committed during the Central American country's bloody 11-year civil war, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Thursday. In testimony to a House Appropriations subcommittee, he also said he is determined to ensure that the State Department will never mislead Congress about atrocities committed by friendly countries.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The release this week of a United Nations report on human rights abuses in El Salvador has resurrected the decade-long debate over U.S. aid to that country and prompted Democratic calls for a thorough investigation of American involvement in one of Central America's bloodiest civil wars. Outraged by the findings of the U.N.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Even while pleading for a climate of forgiveness, the U.N. Truth Commission on El Salvador called Monday for the dismissal of all military officers and government officials cited for human rights violations and proposed that all violators, including rebel officers, be banned from taking part in Salvadoran public and political life for at least 10 years. These provisions, which have already led Defense Minister Gen.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The watershed U.N-sponsored investigation into the brutalities of El Salvador's civil war paints a chilling picture of organized, systematic violence conducted by a network of military officials and right-wing death squads bent on destroying any and all enemies.
NEWS
December 16, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A still-divided El Salvador formally ended 12 years of brutal civil war Tuesday, declaring a new era of peace and reconciliation but recognizing it will take a long time for this battered society's deep wounds to heal.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, men like veteran guerrilla Manuel de Jesus Lopez Najarro are putting down their guns and going home. The separation of fighter from weapon is a painful one, Lopez says, like losing a hand. But it's time, time to move on and join a battered society struggling to recover from 12 years of civil war. Lopez is one of approximately 6,000 rebels who have been demobilized since the signing in January of U.N.
NEWS
November 25, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three weeks from the conclusion of a fragile peace process, El Salvador's leftist guerrillas Tuesday suspended the demobilization of their army, charging that the government has failed to make good on promises to give land to squatters. Guerrilla commander Shafik Handal said no more rebels will lay down their weapons until the government gives legal guarantees that peasants and some former fighters who have occupied farmland will not be evicted. Under U.N.
NEWS
October 21, 1992 | From Reuters
Forensic experts have unearthed the skeletons of children and babies in this remote hamlet, bolstering charges that soldiers killed hundreds of civilians in the largest massacre in El Salvador's civil war. Twenty-two battered skulls and skeletons were exhumed Monday from the ruins of a church where U.S.-trained soldiers of the elite Atlacatl Battalion allegedly began a three-day slaughter of more than 800 people in December, 1981. "They are all children and several were babies.
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