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El Toro Air Show

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1990
The annual air show at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station makes its three-day run this weekend, and organizers warn that traffic could be especially bad this year because of construction on the Santa Ana Freeway. Below are recommended routes, which will be posted with signs leading to the base.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1997
The final El Toro Air Show, held last month, was a good reminder of the important role the Marine Corps base has played in Orange County for decades. It also should help keep attention focused on what will become of the base once the Marines leave in 1999. What is said to have started as a simple open house on the base in 1950, drawing about 15,000 spectators for a show lasting about an hour, had grown by the finale to more than 200 planes on the ground and two dozen performances in the air.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1991
More than 1 million people are expected at the El Toro Air Show this weekend, most arriving by car, creating traffic jams to rival the spectacle in the sky. Even those simply drivingby the El Toro base will be affected by road closures and traffic slowing to watch the aerial displays. Taking the bus or riding a bike offers a less nerve-racking way to get to the show. SATURDAY 8 a.m. AERIAL MANEUVERS--John Collver demonstrates maneuvers in World War II trainer. 8:20 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1997
The reports of the final El Toro Air Show were of great interest, with fine photos. Mention might also have been made of the first air show in the U.S. at Dominguez Field, Jan. 10, 1910. The field was located on the Dominguez Rancho, the present campus of Cal State Dominguez Hills. The show was a great success, with some of the world's greatest aviators, and drew thousands of spectators for two years. DAVID B. CRESSEY Mission Viejo
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1991
So the El Toro Air Show was a huge success, "kicked ass" and all, and the million-plus spectators are no doubt bursting buttons with patriotic pride. But a lot of residents in the flight pattern of the base who endured a week of deafening practice flights and the preview and performances are wondering just what all that high-risk, high-cost extravaganza has to do with national defense. ALBERT JOHNSON, Laguna Hills
NEWS
April 27, 1995
The 45th annual El Toro Air Show, Saturday and Sunday at the Marine Corps Air Station, will include more than 160 types of aircraft and will feature a 75-minute aerial performance by the U.S. Navy Blue Angels. General admission and parking are free. Getting There * Santa Ana (5) Freeway. Northbound traffic exits Alton Parkway, southbound traffic exits at Jamboree Road, Culver Drive or Jeffrey Road. Sand Canyon Avenue exits will be closed from 6 a.m. Saturday to 6 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
April 25, 1991
Aircraft ranging from World War II bombers to Gulf War fighters not only perform in the sky but also can be inspected on the ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1997 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Ana toddler who fractured her skull in a fall from the grandstand at the El Toro Air Show was listed in serious but stable condition Monday and received a good-cheer visit from the Navy's Blue Angels. The 17-month-old girl underwent surgery Sunday evening to stop bleeding in her brain after she slipped through the slats of bleachers earlier in the day, said Andrea Pronk, spokeswoman for Children's Hospital of Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1988 | RICHARD BEENE, Times Staff Writer
The commanding general of the 3rd Aircraft Wing at El Toro said Monday that the Marine Corps would reassess the stunts and performances planned at its annual air show after the crash of three Italian military jets during an aerobatic maneuver in West Germany. While dismissing as highly unlikely the chance of a similar accident occurring at the Orange County show, Maj. Gen. Donald E.P.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | ZION BANKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Henry W. Wedaa remembers with a certain fondness the bombing missions he flew through enemy fire over Nazi Germany during World War II. "I wouldn't have missed it for the world, but I'm not sure I'd do it again," said the 67-year-old former bombardier. This weekend, he has good reason to recall those days. A souvenir of Wedaa's military service--a B-24 like the one he flew during 30 bombing raids in the spring of 1944--will be parked on the airfield at the El Toro Air Show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1997 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Ana toddler who fractured her skull in a fall from the grandstand at the El Toro Air Show was listed in serious but stable condition Monday and received a good-cheer visit from the Navy's Blue Angels. The 17-month-old girl underwent surgery Sunday evening to stop bleeding in her brain after she slipped through the slats of bleachers earlier in the day, said Andrea Pronk, spokeswoman for Children's Hospital of Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND and MELINDA FULMER and JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Living up to its name, the sleek, eerily quiet B-2 Stealth bomber swooped past hundreds of thousands of awe-struck spectators Saturday, covering a huge piece of sky with its bizarre, bat-like structure and adding a dramatic flourish to the 47th and final El Toro Air Show. There was little room in this crowd of military hardware enthusiasts for concerns about the B-2's $2.2-billion price tag, or its recent difficulties performing in training flights.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1997 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If your weekend plans are still up in the air, leave them there (figuratively speaking). The 47th and final El Toro Air Show opens to the public Saturday and Sunday. Whichever day you don't go, you can see what it feels like to be at the controls at the simulated flight facility called Fightertown. Be prepared, though, to also fight considerable land traffic in the area, no matter when you go this weekend.
NEWS
April 20, 1997 | BONNIE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a few days, the airspace above El Toro Marine Corps Air Station will be slashed by thundering jets, stroked by gentle gliders and seared again by the staged-but-sinister dogfights that for 47 years have thrilled and inspired millions of spectators below. As they have for decades, the Blue Angels will swirl and twirl in their famous blue jets, and the ominous Air Force Stealth bomber is sure to rattle nerves as it roars overhead. Precision skydivers will drop magically from the clouds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1997 | BONNIE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a few days, the airspace above El Toro Marine Corps Air Station will be slashed by thundering jets, stroked by gentle gliders and seared again by the staged-but-sinister dogfights that for decades have thrilled and inspired millions of spectators below. As they have for 46 years, the Blue Angels will swirl and twirl in their famous blue jets, and the ominous Air Force Stealth bomber is sure to rattle nerves as it roars overhead. Precision skydivers will drop magically from the clouds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1997 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Short of taking over the controls of a Blue Angels jet, Michael Ullman sees volunteering for the annual air show at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station as the closest he can get to the thrilling speed, the controlled fury and the death-defying acrobatic feats of the Navy's precision flying team. He's run the beer booth, ushered people to their seats, and helped organize a golf tournament that precedes the air show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1996
Am I the only one who saw the El Toro Air Show--through tinted eyes? I know I was wearing sunglasses like everyone else, but I think my tinted glass was of a darker hue. You tell me. Did you see the AV-8B maneuvering through the air like a painter's brush? Or did you see a steel machine made by one human to kill another? Did you see the bombs a football field away and marvel at the wonders of man? Or did you feel the heat from the flames and wonder how it must have felt for another human to be standing in the middle of that fire?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1996 | ANTONIO OLIVO and RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Masked in camouflage face paint, 9-year-old Justin Smith aimed his toy machine-gun at a U.S. Marine AV-8B Harrier fighter plane hovering about 150 above him Friday and fired. Having done this for six consecutive years now, the aspiring Navy pilot said, "I hardly ever miss." As the huge craft darted left and right, its powerful engines drowning out all other sound at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station, Justin dropped his weapon and covered his ears.
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