Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEl Toro International Airport
IN THE NEWS

El Toro International Airport

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1999 | James Meier, (949) 574-4204
Councilman Bert Hack is scheduled to speak before the state's Local Government Committee today as part of the city's attempt to halt the proposed El Toro international airport. Hack is a member of Taxpayers for Responsible Planning, an anti-airport group created to oppose Measure A.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 9, 2003
Re "Irvine Outlines Plan to Raise $353 Million for Great Park," Jan. 29: According to the map, the Central Park is in the center of the El Toro property, directly over the two 10,000-foot-runways and two 8,000-foot-runways, which in some parts are 12 feet thick. The Navy has never made an assessment of the toxicity of the land around and under the runways. Nobody knows how much contamination there is. What is known for sure is that for 57 years the planes were washed down regularly with toxic substances and the ground around the runways was covered with oil to keep the dust down.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2000 | Sue Doyle, (949) 574-4204
From a distance, the 350 people who picnicked on blankets and played on swings at the Crown Valley-Highlands Community Park on Saturday resembled a gigantic family reunion. One step inside the park and the real purpose became obvious: The get-together was to fight the proposed El Toro International Airport. The picnic raised $13,000 for the cause.
OPINION
January 26, 2003
Re "What Cox Should Have Said on Airport, Schools," Jan. 19: Alas, after just one blissful Sunday edition with no letters about El Toro, Larry Root uses Rep. Christopher Cox's piece (which was about the economy, not the airport) to bootstrap into a harangue about the economic need for an El Toro International Airport. Root conveniently ignores the facts that Orange County already has a not-yet-paid-for, $250-million airport (John Wayne) and that it operates at 50% of its designed capacity, strangled by artificial limits on capacity and operation by Newport Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1999 | James Meier, (714) 966-5988
The City Council discussed support for the Safe and Healthy Communities initiative at its meeting Tuesday. The initiative would require the county's voters to approve plans for airports, hazardous waste landfills and large jails by a two-thirds vote. Currently, the city has both the proposed El Toro international airport and James A. Musick Branch Jail expansion with which to deal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997
In the United States, we have a time-tested democratic system which allows the people to vote their preferences. The outcome of the majority vote, not the wishes of the losing group, dictate the official action to be taken. On two separate officially sanctioned elections, Orange County voters have decided positively to convert El Toro Marine Corps Air Station into a commercial airport. After various lengthy studies and surveys conducted by outside legitimate and technically expert organizations, the Orange County Board of Supervisors, by majority vote, gave its approval to convert, among other options, the present military airport into a commercial airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1996 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 300 South County residents rallied outside an evening meeting of the Orange County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday night to protest plans for a commercial international airport at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station. The mood was upbeat and hopeful as a handful of speakers insisted the fight against the airport isn't over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1996 | LARRY AGRAN and STEPHEN C. SMITH, Larry Agran, an attorney and former mayor of Irvine, is voluntary chairman of Project '99. Stephen C. Smith is a public policy consultant volunteering his time to Project '99
The sage philosopher Yogi Berra once said, "It ain't over 'til it's over." The fight to stop the El Toro International Airport is going into extra innings. Despite two elections where big-bucks developers funded massive disinformation campaigns to mislead the electorate, objective reviews by both the Air Transport Assn. and the Air Line Pilots Assn. found serious flaws in the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1997
Former Orange County Supervisor Roger R. Stanton's wise recommendation recently to study the economic benefits of a nonairport option in conjunction with studying the economic benefits of the airport option reflect a modicum of wisdom in a county otherwise fraught with "leap before you look" politics. The supervisors, in limiting the size of the proposed airport at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station to a maximum of 25 million passengers per year, reflect a degree of honesty known by most individuals all along, that geography constraints and real consumer use of El Toro will probably not exceed 20 million to 22 million annual passengers, even if John Wayne closes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1997
Proponents of an international air terminal at El Toro continue to accuse the opponents of distributing misinformation about the proposed airport. An old Biblical maxim says, "Let he who is without sin throw the first stone." Proponents say thousands of new jobs will be generated with a new airport. They fail to mention the thousands of job losses with the downsizing or closing of John Wayne Airport. There is a grand idea, suggested in a recent letter in The Times, that a casino be opened on the property.
NEWS
August 11, 2002
Re "2 Supervisors Propose a Fifth Ballot Measure on El Toro Planning," Aug. 1: At this point, it comes as no surprise that supervisors Cynthia P. Coad and Chuck Smith are still not convinced that the El Toro International Airport idea is a bad idea and dead. After literally having wasted millions of our tax dollars and displaying wanton disrespect for the residents of Orange County, they supposedly wish that we, the voters, should actually have a say in what goes on in Orange County.
NEWS
June 23, 2002
Re "Coad Threat to Base's Future," editorial, June 16: Your editorial misses the point. Three months ago The Times complimented Supervisor Cynthia P. Coad for her vote to cede El Toro to Irvine. Coad's vote was predicated on one simple issue--she wanted an ironclad commitment from Irvine that $800,000 per year from El Toro's development would be earmarked for North County parks. The deal, brokered by Supervisor Todd Spitzer, was viewed as a turning point in the El Toro airport debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2000 | Sue Doyle, (949) 574-4204
From a distance, the 350 people who picnicked on blankets and played on swings at the Crown Valley-Highlands Community Park on Saturday resembled a gigantic family reunion. One step inside the park and the real purpose became obvious: The get-together was to fight the proposed El Toro International Airport. The picnic raised $13,000 for the cause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1999 | James Meier, (949) 574-4204
Councilman Bert Hack is scheduled to speak before the state's Local Government Committee today as part of the city's attempt to halt the proposed El Toro international airport. Hack is a member of Taxpayers for Responsible Planning, an anti-airport group created to oppose Measure A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1999 | James Meier, (714) 966-5988
The City Council discussed support for the Safe and Healthy Communities initiative at its meeting Tuesday. The initiative would require the county's voters to approve plans for airports, hazardous waste landfills and large jails by a two-thirds vote. Currently, the city has both the proposed El Toro international airport and James A. Musick Branch Jail expansion with which to deal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1998
As I read Clarence Turner's May 10 column, "How to Build an Airport That Will Fly," I recalled a meeting in my office when I was mayor of Irvine during the 1980s. Then-Newport Beach council member Clarence Turner and one of his pals in the Airport Working Group asked for the meeting, at which they demanded that Irvine accede to Newport's wishes to convert the Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro to a commercial airport. Even now, I recall how impressed I was with their arrogance.
OPINION
January 26, 2003
Re "What Cox Should Have Said on Airport, Schools," Jan. 19: Alas, after just one blissful Sunday edition with no letters about El Toro, Larry Root uses Rep. Christopher Cox's piece (which was about the economy, not the airport) to bootstrap into a harangue about the economic need for an El Toro International Airport. Root conveniently ignores the facts that Orange County already has a not-yet-paid-for, $250-million airport (John Wayne) and that it operates at 50% of its designed capacity, strangled by artificial limits on capacity and operation by Newport Beach.
OPINION
February 9, 2003
Re "Irvine Outlines Plan to Raise $353 Million for Great Park," Jan. 29: According to the map, the Central Park is in the center of the El Toro property, directly over the two 10,000-foot-runways and two 8,000-foot-runways, which in some parts are 12 feet thick. The Navy has never made an assessment of the toxicity of the land around and under the runways. Nobody knows how much contamination there is. What is known for sure is that for 57 years the planes were washed down regularly with toxic substances and the ground around the runways was covered with oil to keep the dust down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1998
Several readers expressed their deep concern and displeasure over Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan's plans to expand Los Angeles International Airport (Letters, March 15). It's obvious that they haven't been reading the Orange County edition of The Times. If they had, they would have read that bigger airports are better for the community. The Orange County supervisors and Newport Beach businessmen have told us repeatedly that creating the 38-million-passenger El Toro international airport in the middle of a bedroom community will create high-quality jobs, lower air pollution, reduce crime, eliminate traffic congestion and raise property values.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1998
Re "Empty Sky Above Instant Airports," Feb. 20: There are just too many similarities between the MidAmerica Airport boondoggle near St. Louis and the current situation involving the proposed El Toro International Airport to be ignored. Maybe the Orange County Board of Supervisors could learn from St. Clair County's experience. St. Clair gambled by building an airport without prior airline commitment and lost even though, as stated in the article, the county supposedly designed the airport with the expectation of five years of negative cash flow and no passengers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|