Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsElaine Brown
IN THE NEWS

Elaine Brown

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 24, 1993 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For three years Elaine Brown had lived in Paris, where she says the color of her skin mattered far less than who she was. But it wasn't long after her plane landed in the United States that Brown says racism enveloped her like a mighty fog. The prejudice, she says, is intangible, yet palpable. Brown saw it in the face of a Boston bellboy who greeted her with an attitude; and in a hotel clerk in Beverly Hills, who didn't believe she was a guest: "It's incredible the rage I've felt.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 7, 2002 | KAI MARISTED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
THE CONDEMNATION OF LITTLE B By Elaine Brown Beacon Press 288 pages, $28.50 "The first difference which strikes us is that of color.... Is it not the foundation of a greater or less share of beauty in the two races? Are not the fine mixtures of red and white ... preferable to that eternal monotony, which reigns in the countenances, that immovable veil of black, which covers the emotions of the other race?"
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1994 | DARA AKIKO TOM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND--They are older, grayer. They no longer seek power in the barrel of a gun, and most left the organization long ago. But one thing has not changed in the nearly 30 years since they arose from the mean streets of Oakland: The men and women who once led the Black Panthers still believe in bringing "All Power to All People." And though many former Panther leaders aren't interested in reviving the militant party of the past--the Panthers are now just a service organization in Oakland--they lament that the social work they began remains unfinished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, Times Staff Writer
Elaine Brown, 82, says playing pool with the guys at the Glendale Adult Recreation Center keeps her mind sharp. Elaine Brown squints, draws back the pool cue, strikes the ball and squeals with delight as it rolls into a corner pocket. "When you shoot, you try to make the shot or leave the ball in a good position for your partner. You want your opponent in the worse position," Brown says, sounding as if she is giving away a trade secret. "That's the name of the game."
NEWS
March 7, 2002 | KAI MARISTED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
THE CONDEMNATION OF LITTLE B By Elaine Brown Beacon Press 288 pages, $28.50 "The first difference which strikes us is that of color.... Is it not the foundation of a greater or less share of beauty in the two races? Are not the fine mixtures of red and white ... preferable to that eternal monotony, which reigns in the countenances, that immovable veil of black, which covers the emotions of the other race?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, Times Staff Writer
Elaine Brown, 82, says playing pool with the guys at the Glendale Adult Recreation Center keeps her mind sharp. Elaine Brown squints, draws back the pool cue, strikes the ball and squeals with delight as it rolls into a corner pocket. "When you shoot, you try to make the shot or leave the ball in a good position for your partner. You want your opponent in the worse position," Brown says, sounding as if she is giving away a trade secret. "That's the name of the game."
NEWS
January 4, 1993 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You'd have to write a book to write an adequate review of Elaine Brown's "A Taste of Power." It's astonishing as a historical document of the rise and fall of the Black Panther Party, the most militant black organization of the '60s.
OPINION
July 24, 2007
Re "Evading death and taxes," Column One, July 20 Ed and Elaine Brown are just tax cheats, plain and simple. There is nothing heroic about their "stand." We pay taxes because it is a somewhat fair and equitable way for all citizens to fund the workings of government. Do the Browns honestly feel the better alternative is no government? I certainly do not believe that the U.S.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | Associated Press
Cars wound along the top of this region's jagged ocean cliffs Saturday for the first time since the stretch of coastal California 1 was closed because of earthquake damage. Residents greeted the traffic with a parade, balloons and a "Welcome Back" banner strung across the road. The stretch of highway leading to town from the south has been closed since January, 1990, cutting the flow of beach-goers and their spending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1996 | ANDREW D. BLECHMAN
Sheriff's deputies arrested three Thousand Oaks residents on suspicion of running a drug den out of their home, authorities said Friday. Another Thousand Oaks resident and a Camarillo woman were arrested as well on Thursday, and all were booked into the Ventura County Jail, authorities said. Deputies said they seized half an ounce of methamphetamine and numerous syringes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1994 | DARA AKIKO TOM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND--They are older, grayer. They no longer seek power in the barrel of a gun, and most left the organization long ago. But one thing has not changed in the nearly 30 years since they arose from the mean streets of Oakland: The men and women who once led the Black Panthers still believe in bringing "All Power to All People." And though many former Panther leaders aren't interested in reviving the militant party of the past--the Panthers are now just a service organization in Oakland--they lament that the social work they began remains unfinished.
NEWS
February 24, 1993 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For three years Elaine Brown had lived in Paris, where she says the color of her skin mattered far less than who she was. But it wasn't long after her plane landed in the United States that Brown says racism enveloped her like a mighty fog. The prejudice, she says, is intangible, yet palpable. Brown saw it in the face of a Boston bellboy who greeted her with an attitude; and in a hotel clerk in Beverly Hills, who didn't believe she was a guest: "It's incredible the rage I've felt.
NEWS
January 4, 1993 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You'd have to write a book to write an adequate review of Elaine Brown's "A Taste of Power." It's astonishing as a historical document of the rise and fall of the Black Panther Party, the most militant black organization of the '60s.
NEWS
August 28, 1989 | From Times wire services
About 1,000 mourners jammed a Baptist church for funeral services "of celebration" today for Huey P. Newton, black radical of the 1960s who police believe was slain by a young crack dealer in a street confrontation. "We celebrate his homegoing not as a thug, not as a criminal but as a member of the Allen Temple Baptist Church," a speaker said to vigorous applause from the audience as he introduced the Rev. J. Alfred Smith, who presided over the service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2008 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
The quarrel between black power advocates that ended in gunfire in a UCLA classroom had lasted only a few moments that sunny day. But the controversy over who was responsible for the murder of two young men taking part in a discussion over leadership of a fledgling black studies program at the campus has simmered for nearly four decades. On Thursday, aging leaders of the 1960s Black Panther Party returned to the site of the Jan.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|