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Elaine Pagels

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September 18, 1988 | Arthur Hertzberg, Hertzberg is professor of religion at Dartmouth College and senior research scholar at the Middle East Institute at Columbia University. He is a former president of the American Jewish Congress. His books include "The Zionist Idea" and "Being Jewish in America." and
"Adam, Eve, and the Serpent" is an astute work of scholarship about the first four centuries of the Christian faith. According to Elaine Pagels, Christianity was a pluralistic religion in its early years, characterized by a belief in human freedom, deep divisions about the most fundamental doctrines and, in some factions, no stigma attached to human sexuality. The turn toward repression occurred when Christianity became the religion of the Roman Empire.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
There was a time when scholars of early Christianity labored in anonymity at the bottom of academic pecking orders. Then came Princeton professor Elaine Pagels, whose "The Gnostic Gospels" became a surprise bestseller in the 1970s and ignited international interest in the hidden sayings of a strange band of believers scorned by orthodox Christians. Those gospels were discovered six decades ago in a jar buried in Egypt.
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BOOKS
October 8, 1995 | Adam Begley, Adam Begley is at work on a book about nine contemporary novelists. He lives in Delavan, Wis
With the millennium upon us, God and Satan are scheduled for a battle royal, though we skeptics suspect that the winner will be the super-hero who can pull off the most successful vanishing act. So far it's a lopsided match. Evil is all the rage, and Good, the frail blessing of a decamped deity, is clearly in need of a new press agent. In magazines, on television, the radio and the Internet, pundits accustomed to the meaty certainties of politics and policy have been wrestling with imponderables, explicating Saint Augustine and "Pulp Fiction" to get at predestination and free will.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2003 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
What do people want from religion? Clearly, the answer would not be the same for the countless people all over the world who seek in their many different faiths sustenance, hope, guidance, community, exaltation, certainty -- or Kierkegaardian fear and trembling. In her latest book, scholar Elaine Pagels reveals something of her own personal religious quest. She begins by telling us about the difficult time in her life when her infant son was diagnosed with a fatal lung disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
There was a time when scholars of early Christianity labored in anonymity at the bottom of academic pecking orders. Then came Princeton professor Elaine Pagels, whose "The Gnostic Gospels" became a surprise bestseller in the 1970s and ignited international interest in the hidden sayings of a strange band of believers scorned by orthodox Christians. Those gospels were discovered six decades ago in a jar buried in Egypt.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2003 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
What do people want from religion? Clearly, the answer would not be the same for the countless people all over the world who seek in their many different faiths sustenance, hope, guidance, community, exaltation, certainty -- or Kierkegaardian fear and trembling. In her latest book, scholar Elaine Pagels reveals something of her own personal religious quest. She begins by telling us about the difficult time in her life when her infant son was diagnosed with a fatal lung disease.
BOOKS
August 1, 2004
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction *--* *--* 1 Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon (Vintage: $12) An autistic teen seeks a killer. 2 Angels & Demons by Dan Brown (Pocket Books: $7.99) A Harvard scholar uncovers a vendetta against the Catholic Church. 3 The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks (Warner: $12.95) Teen lovers, interrupted by World War II, get another chance. 4 The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd (Penguin: $14) A teenage girl is haunted by her mother's death.
BOOKS
May 23, 2004
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction *--* *--* 1 Angels & Demons by Dan Brown (Pocket Books: $7.99) A Harvard scholar uncovers a vendetta against the Catholic Church. 2 The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold (Back Bay: $13.95) A murdered girl tells the story of those left behind. 3 Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides (Picador: $15) A Greek family embraces the American dream. 4 The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd (Penguin: $14) A teenage girl is haunted by her mother's death.
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Morton Smith, a controversial Columbia University historian who discovered evidence of a "Secret Gospel of Mark" and theorized that Jesus was a magician figure, has died of heart failure in his New York City home. He was 76. Smith, who died July 11, was an acknowledged authority on ancient history, including early Christianity and its relationships to Judaism and mystery cults.
NEWS
April 30, 1999 | From ASSOCIATED PRESS
Choosing one of the most idiosyncratic of literary memoirs, the Modern Library pronounced "The Education of Henry Adams" this century's best English-language work of nonfiction. William James' landmark study "The Varieties of Religious Experience" came in second on the publishing house's top 100 list. It was followed by Booker T. Washington's autobiography "Up From Slavery," a founding document for the philosophy of black self-help.
BOOKS
October 8, 1995 | Adam Begley, Adam Begley is at work on a book about nine contemporary novelists. He lives in Delavan, Wis
With the millennium upon us, God and Satan are scheduled for a battle royal, though we skeptics suspect that the winner will be the super-hero who can pull off the most successful vanishing act. So far it's a lopsided match. Evil is all the rage, and Good, the frail blessing of a decamped deity, is clearly in need of a new press agent. In magazines, on television, the radio and the Internet, pundits accustomed to the meaty certainties of politics and policy have been wrestling with imponderables, explicating Saint Augustine and "Pulp Fiction" to get at predestination and free will.
BOOKS
September 18, 1988 | Arthur Hertzberg, Hertzberg is professor of religion at Dartmouth College and senior research scholar at the Middle East Institute at Columbia University. He is a former president of the American Jewish Congress. His books include "The Zionist Idea" and "Being Jewish in America." and
"Adam, Eve, and the Serpent" is an astute work of scholarship about the first four centuries of the Christian faith. According to Elaine Pagels, Christianity was a pluralistic religion in its early years, characterized by a belief in human freedom, deep divisions about the most fundamental doctrines and, in some factions, no stigma attached to human sexuality. The turn toward repression occurred when Christianity became the religion of the Roman Empire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Marvin W. Meyer, an expert on Gnosticism and ancient texts about Jesus outside the New Testament who challenged the traditional portrayal of Judas Iscariot as the ultimate biblical villain, has died. He was 64. Meyer, whose book "The Gospel of Judas" sold more than 1.2 million copies and prompted frequent guest appearances on television documentaries and other programs, died Aug. 16 of complications from melanoma, according to his wife, Bonnie. The tanned, athletic man who wore rumpled khakis, oversized shirts and a silver hoop in his left ear "was our Indiana Jones," said James L. Doti, president of Chapman University in Orange, where Meyer held the Griset Chair in Bible and Christian Studies and was director of the Albert Schweitzer Institute.
MAGAZINE
October 6, 2002 | AL RIDENOUR
Near the nexus of Hillhurst Avenue and Sunset and Hollywood boulevards, Bishop Stephan Hoeller has presided since 1977 at Ecclesia Gnostica, the tiny, incense-infused chapel of the Gnostic Society. Gnosticism, an ancient form of Christianity that flourished in the 1st to 3rd centuries, rejects doctrines such as original sin and emphasizes transcendence through inward, intuitive knowledge ("gnosis") of the divine spark in each individual.
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