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BUSINESS
August 30, 1989 | David Olmos, Times staff writer
Kyocera International Inc. of San Diego said it has completed its $250-million cash acquisition of the Elco Group from Wickes Cos. Inc. Elco's administrative offices are in Laguna Hills, but the electronic connector manufacturer's main plant is in Huntingdon, Pa. The firm, with about 700 employees and $150 million in annual sales, also has facilities in Japan, West German, South Korea and England. Kyocera International is the North American arm of Kyocera Corp., a $2.
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BUSINESS
August 30, 1989 | David Olmos, Times staff writer
Kyocera International Inc. of San Diego said it has completed its $250-million cash acquisition of the Elco Group from Wickes Cos. Inc. Elco's administrative offices are in Laguna Hills, but the electronic connector manufacturer's main plant is in Huntingdon, Pa. The firm, with about 700 employees and $150 million in annual sales, also has facilities in Japan, West German, South Korea and England. Kyocera International is the North American arm of Kyocera Corp., a $2.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1985
James R. Culbert, 43, has been named president and chief executive of Mr. Build International, a Santa Ana company that franchises property-maintenance and contracting services. He succeeds Art Bartlett, 51, who co-founded the company with Culbert in 1981. Bartlett will continue as chairman. Culbert's association with Bartlett dates back to 1974, when he began as a salesman for the Century 21 real estate franchise company, which Bartlett founded in 1972. Since its founding four years ago, Mr.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Washington and in Silicon Valley, efforts to limit foreign buyouts of American technology companies are gaining momentum. In Washington, congressional Democrats are trying to renew and strengthen existing procedures for reviewing takeovers of high-tech firms by foreign companies. That effort comes in the wake of the Gulf War, which highlighted America's dependence on overseas suppliers for some critical technologies.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1990 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 58, Kazuo Inamori stands at the pinnacle of success in Japan's business world. As founder of Kyocera Corp., Inamori pioneered high-tech ceramics, shepherded the firm to leadership in that market and secured a reputation as one of Japan's visionary leaders. But he did it as an outsider, with his nose pressed against the window of Japan's best schools, companies and business networks. Inamori's story of rags to riches is as American as Horatio Alger. He contracted tuberculosis at 13.
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