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BUSINESS
January 10, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A two-year effort to help employees solve child- and elder-care problems has exceeded its goals, with 156 companies raising $27 million to create dependent-care programs, according to a report released Tuesday. The initiative, the American Business Collaboration for Quality Dependent Care, was launched in September, 1992, led by 11 blue-chip companies. While 137 companies were expected to participate, 156 actually did, said Work-Family Directions Inc., a Boston-based consulting group.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A two-year effort to help employees solve child- and elder-care problems has exceeded its goals, with 156 companies raising $27 million to create dependent-care programs, according to a report released Tuesday. The initiative, the American Business Collaboration for Quality Dependent Care, was launched in September, 1992, led by 11 blue-chip companies. While 137 companies were expected to participate, 156 actually did, said Work-Family Directions Inc., a Boston-based consulting group.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Camarillo Health Care District is taking steps toward seizing Pleasant Valley Hospital, as part of an effort to halt the planned merger of the Camarillo hospital with an Oxnard medical center. The health district board voted unanimously last week to find an attorney to begin legal proceedings to condemn the nonprofit hospital and bring it back under the district's control. Such a move would prevent Pleasant Valley from merging with St. John's Regional Medical Center in Oxnard.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colleen Blair takes care of her 94-year-old father, who is senile and unable to bathe or dress himself. Her 86-year-old mother recently had a heart attack and can no longer help her husband. Blair, 53, also works. As she makes T-shirts in her Costa Mesa home, she also must care for her parents. If she has to deliver shirts to a customer, Blair must bring her parents along. Although the arrangement works, it takes a toll in the form of physical strain and mental stress.
HEALTH
June 11, 2007 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
LISA WOOD describes herself as a woman in the middle -- a daughter and mother struggling to nurture one new life and, with equal tenderness, attend another on a fitful journey to its end. At 44, she cares for a 5-year-old daughter and a once fiercely independent mother with early Alzheimer's disease, who at times can be as demanding and exasperating as her child. The result, says the Sunland resident, is a life lived on a hamster wheel of constant motion and little progress.
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Home-based entrepreneurship is attracting growing numbers of recruits to its ranks. These "open-collar workers" come from a variety of backgrounds: lifelong entrepreneurs, homemakers, downsized workers, graduate students, stay-at-home parents, homebound disabled people and retirees. But their goals are similar: to be their own bosses, work flexible hours and devote their efforts to projects they love. It takes an industrious risk-taker to be a successful home-based entrepreneur.
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