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Eleanor Antin

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November 2, 2000 | SHAUNA SNOW
* The artist's work is on view in the "Made in California: Now" at LACMA West and "Revealing and Concealing: Portraits & Identity" at the Skirball Cultural Center. Antin lives in San Diego but is a frequent L.A. visitor. Thai Food: In San Diego, the restaurants are the pits--there are two Thai places here that I like. The Thai House on Pico is wonderful-looking with a very '80s decor like an unfinished loft, and the Talesai in Studio City is fantastic and very inventive.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Artist Eleanor Antin has played lots of memorable alter-egos in her time. A saintly nurse in the Crimean War. The bearded "king" of a California beach town. A black prima ballerina in Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. She has also embraced a variety of real-life roles: Bronx native, daughter of a Stalinist mother and socialist father, professor emeritus of art at UC San Diego, and postmodernist pioneer who blithely breaks rules and cannily collapses the boundaries between photography, drawing, video, film and performance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1999 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Expect a transformative experience at the Eleanor Antin retrospective that opened Sunday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Transformation is key to Antin's art, and Howard Fox, curator of this utterly engaging show, has made it an integral part of the installation. From the first few white-box galleries to the saturated color and dramatic darkness of the last, the show itself is theater, a terrifically apt showcase for Antin's theatrical sensibility, both comedic and tragic.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2000 | SHAUNA SNOW
* The artist's work is on view in the "Made in California: Now" at LACMA West and "Revealing and Concealing: Portraits & Identity" at the Skirball Cultural Center. Antin lives in San Diego but is a frequent L.A. visitor. Thai Food: In San Diego, the restaurants are the pits--there are two Thai places here that I like. The Thai House on Pico is wonderful-looking with a very '80s decor like an unfinished loft, and the Talesai in Studio City is fantastic and very inventive.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | GERARD GARZA, SAN DIEGO COUNTY ARTS EDITOR
Glasnost is having a profound effect on art in the Soviet Union. As reported in Wednesday's Times, expatriate artists such as Mstislav Rostropovich and Rudolf Nureyev are returning for emotion-filled performances in their homeland. A lesser-known story is that of artists who fell into disfavor shortly after the revolution and who are now having their work unearthed and brought to new prominence.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1995 | Leah Ollman, Leah Ollman is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
A skeleton wearing a frilly purple hat stands just inside the door of Eleanor Antin's spacious studio at UC San Diego, greeting the visitor with an instant burst of the artist's trademark fatalistic humor. Just in case the message doesn't sink in, a handbill visible on the door cheerily illustrates several early warning signs of cancer. The studio, like Antin herself and her work of 25 years in performance art, writing, installation and independent film, entertains--with an edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is The Times' art critic
Eleanor Antin has gotten past the gnawing anxiety. Or, as she succinctly puts it: "The initial weirdness is over." Three years ago, when curator Howard Fox called to invite her to present her work in a 30-year retrospective at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Antin responded, as many artists do, with a coddled mixture of excitement and trepidation--excitement over an honor that comes to relatively few, trepidation over seeing her life's work laid bare, all at once.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1999
Much as I enjoy Eleanor Antin's work, and Leah Ollman's review, I might suggest that Leah do some more homework ("Will the Real Eleanor Antin Stand Up? (And Take a Bow)," May 27). Before Cindy Sherman and before Antin, there was Marcel Duchamp, who "lived in character" as Rose Selavy (a pun on "eros, c'est la vie,"), back in the early part of this century. Man Ray took a nice portrait of "her." LISA SCHOYER Altadena
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"The Man Without a World" is a novel, unorthodox film, inventive and unexpected. However, like many an ambitious project made with the most limited resources, imagination runs ahead of execution, and the audience ends up having to cope with the inevitable defects of the film's virtues. "The Man Without a World" (at the Monicas) is first of all a fascinating stylistic experiment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2012
ART As part of Pacific Standard Time's Performance and Public Art festival, Eleanor Antin's "Before the Revolution" explores Antin's imaginary character Eleanora Antinova, an African American ballerina trying to make it in a famous Russian ballet company. Performed by actors who manipulate Antin's original life-scale puppets, the production is directed by Antin and Robert Castro. Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd. 2 and 7 p.m. Sun. Free. (310) 443-7000.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1999
Much as I enjoy Eleanor Antin's work, and Leah Ollman's review, I might suggest that Leah do some more homework ("Will the Real Eleanor Antin Stand Up? (And Take a Bow)," May 27). Before Cindy Sherman and before Antin, there was Marcel Duchamp, who "lived in character" as Rose Selavy (a pun on "eros, c'est la vie,"), back in the early part of this century. Man Ray took a nice portrait of "her." LISA SCHOYER Altadena
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1999 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Expect a transformative experience at the Eleanor Antin retrospective that opened Sunday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Transformation is key to Antin's art, and Howard Fox, curator of this utterly engaging show, has made it an integral part of the installation. From the first few white-box galleries to the saturated color and dramatic darkness of the last, the show itself is theater, a terrifically apt showcase for Antin's theatrical sensibility, both comedic and tragic.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is The Times' art critic
Eleanor Antin has gotten past the gnawing anxiety. Or, as she succinctly puts it: "The initial weirdness is over." Three years ago, when curator Howard Fox called to invite her to present her work in a 30-year retrospective at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Antin responded, as many artists do, with a coddled mixture of excitement and trepidation--excitement over an honor that comes to relatively few, trepidation over seeing her life's work laid bare, all at once.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1995 | Leah Ollman, Leah Ollman is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
A skeleton wearing a frilly purple hat stands just inside the door of Eleanor Antin's spacious studio at UC San Diego, greeting the visitor with an instant burst of the artist's trademark fatalistic humor. Just in case the message doesn't sink in, a handbill visible on the door cheerily illustrates several early warning signs of cancer. The studio, like Antin herself and her work of 25 years in performance art, writing, installation and independent film, entertains--with an edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"The Man Without a World" is a novel, unorthodox film, inventive and unexpected. However, like many an ambitious project made with the most limited resources, imagination runs ahead of execution, and the audience ends up having to cope with the inevitable defects of the film's virtues. "The Man Without a World" (at the Monicas) is first of all a fascinating stylistic experiment.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1991 | KEVIN BRASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On one level, Eleanor Antin's "The Man Without a World" is an imaginative gag, a cinematic practical joke. The credits suggest that it's a long lost film by a turn-of-the-century Soviet director named Yevgeny Antinov, but it really is not. Antinov is a fabrication, and the silent film, which screens Sunday at 7 and 9 p.m. at the San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art in La Jolla, was produced in 1991, not 1920.
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