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Election Issues

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2012 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
Vernon's first competitive elections in years took more bizarre twists this week when the L.A. County registrar announced it would uphold disputed ballots that city officials had ruled were fraudulently cast and the city moved to evict some of the voters in question. At a meeting Thursday, Vernon's housing commission gave city staff the approval to remove residents at four households if they are found to have violated their lease agreements. The decision comes after two City Council races were thrown into chaos by claims of widespread voter fraud.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 6, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
In one Florida county, voters were wrongly told they could vote the day after the election. In storm-racked New Jersey, emergency plans to allow email voting proved too popular for election officials to handle. In Pennsylvania and Ohio, a variety of problems raised questions about the integrity of the vote. Although most Americans cast ballots without incident Tuesday, there were enough glitches to cause concern among voting rights activists and to provide work for some of the thousands of lawyers who were standing by, representing parties, candidates and nonpartisan voter advocacy groups.
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NEWS
August 25, 1985
I want to express my sincere appreciation for the superb reporting by your paper during the past school board election for the Inglewood Unified School District. I believe that your comments regarding the candidates had appropriate balance and that the issues were fairly presented. Our run-off election was highly charged with a number of issues, but your paper did not yield to the temptation of sensationalism. I look forward to your continued practice of reporting with fairness and good taste.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
In one Florida county, voters were wrongly told they could vote the day after the election. In storm-racked New Jersey, emergency plans to allow email voting proved too popular for election officials to handle. In Pennsylvania and Ohio, a variety of problems raised questions about the integrity of the vote. Although most Americans cast ballots without incident Tuesday, there were enough glitches to cause concern among voting rights activists and to provide work for some of the thousands of lawyers who were standing by, representing parties, candidates and nonpartisan voter advocacy groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1990
I am sick and tired of watching Feinstein and Wilson scratching and clawing at one another in their ads. The one who'll get my vote is the one who uses the available exposure to tell me about himself or herself--what he or she will do for my state, my community and me. ROBERT BENTLEY Glendale
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2000 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruben Zepeda's advanced placement government class at Grant High School has gotten more than just a textbook lesson in presidential politics in the three weeks since Election Day. The students have watched the political, legal and public relations jousting by the George W. Bush and Al Gore camps with a keen sense that they are witnessing history in the making. Their curiosity about the cliffhanger election was apparent Wednesday as they questioned Rep. Howard L.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
In one Florida county, voters were wrongly told they could vote the day after the election. In storm-racked New Jersey, emergency plans to allow email voting proved too popular for election officials to handle. In Pennsylvania and Ohio, a variety of problems raised questions about the integrity of the vote. Although most Americans cast ballots without incident Tuesday, there were enough glitches to cause concern among voting rights activists and to provide work for some of the thousands of lawyers who were standing by, representing parties, candidates and nonpartisan voter advocacy groups.
NEWS
June 27, 1985 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
When Mayor Edward I. Koch began his unofficial campaign for reelection, many New Yorkers wondered what had happened. Gone was the mayor's quick-to-quip personality and the feistiness that had become his trademark. They also wondered, in light of Koch's natural combativeness, whether his low-key political demeanor could last. The answer came Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2012 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
Vernon's first competitive elections in years took more bizarre twists this week when the L.A. County registrar announced it would uphold disputed ballots that city officials had ruled were fraudulently cast and the city moved to evict some of the voters in question. At a meeting Thursday, Vernon's housing commission gave city staff the approval to remove residents at four households if they are found to have violated their lease agreements. The decision comes after two City Council races were thrown into chaos by claims of widespread voter fraud.
NATIONAL
October 9, 2006 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
More than a week after Rep. Mark Foley (R-Fla.) resigned from the House over his messages to teenage boys who had served as congressional pages, other Republicans are struggling to get off the defensive and back onto the campaign themes they hoped would help preserve their House and Senate majorities after the midterm elections Nov. 7.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2006 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
The Securities and Exchange Commission is again confronting the issue that nearly tore it apart two years ago: the right of shareholders to nominate candidates in corporate board elections. Former SEC Chairman William H. Donaldson tried to establish a means for large blocs of shareholders to place nominees directly on corporate ballot cards. But his plan was shelved amid fierce resistance from two fellow commissioners and the business community.
WORLD
December 13, 2005 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
Iraq's prison abuse scandal spilled anew into the election campaign Monday as a leading Sunni Arab legislative candidate released a video purporting to show tortured detainees at a Baghdad palace used as a government prison. Saleh Mutlak's party also accused the government of delaying the results of an investigation of alleged abuses until after Thursday's parliamentary election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2005 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Nine days after the Legislature missed its deadline for passing a state budget, lawmakers left the Capitol for their districts Thursday still without a deal, after budget talks veered into issues that will appear before voters in November. Legislators and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger have discussed tying a budget deal to several initiatives the governor helped put on the Nov. 8 special election ballot.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2005 | Michael Finnegan, Times Staff Writer
Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean said Friday that his party would wield the Terri Schiavo case against Republicans in the 2006 and 2008 elections, but for now needed to stay focused battling President Bush on Social Security. "We're going to use Terri Schiavo later on," Dean said of the brain-damaged Floridian who died last month after her feeding tube was removed amid a swarm of political controversy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2004 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
When Father Paul Raferty began a recent sermon on the Roman Catholic Church's opposition to abortion, parishioners at his Eagle Rock parish thought his explanation and delivery were lucid and effective. Then the priest digressed into what some saw as thinly veiled partisanship. First he spoke of denying Holy Communion to politicians who supported abortion rights. But he said taking a stand on the war in Iraq was not as clear-cut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2004 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
The series of sweeps by Border Patrol agents in the Inland Empire and San Diego County appear to be over, but the political fallout may last until the November election. Rep. Joe Baca (D-San Bernardino), a staunch Latino rights advocate, jumped into the political storm by leading a protest of the sweeps -- which netted more than 450 suspected illegal immigrants -- and helping prompt federal officials to suspend the roundups.
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