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Election Night

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
Many viewers who tuned in to ABC News' election night coverage on Tuesday were surprised to find the usually impeccable Diane Sawyer acting, well, a little loopy. Throughout the evening's broadcast, the anchor frequently slurred her speech, stumbling multiple times over President Obama's name and, at one point, calling him “President Barack.” She also seemed distracted and easily excited, asking off-topic questions about the Obama campaign's use of exclamation points while leaning heavily on her desk as if for support.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - In the election night count of ballots in Washington state, a "living wage" measure in the small city of SeaTac was ahead in the polls, while a statewide measure to require the labeling of some genetically engineered foods appeared to be lagging.  Because Washington votes entirely by mail, ballot counting will not be completed until later in the week. About half of all mailed ballots are generally completed by the Friday before election day, election officials say, but as long as ballots have a Nov. 5 postmark, they will be counted.
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NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- President Obama was quiet Wednesday, uttering no public words for the first time in many weeks. Instead he spent the day with staffers and family, making a leisurely trip back to the White House after celebrating his reelection with thousands of supporters Tuesday night in his hometown of Chicago. On his way out of town, the president paid a visit to the Obama for America headquarters, where volunteers and staff greeted him with a standing ovation and climbed on top of desks to see the man they helped keep in office.
NEWS
September 11, 2013 | By Cathleen Decker
Politics addicts across the nation will engage today in the post-election tradition of gleaning great, defining truths from smallish, specific races. Much of the time, singular election results are just that, a reminder that all politics is local. But a few clear lessons did emerge from Tuesday's two hallmark contests: Opposites really do attract. Bill de Blasio's sweeping victory in the Democratic primary for New York mayor rested at least in part on the fact that he campaigned against the image and policies of the incumbent, billionaire Michael Bloomberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
For viewers with a taste for schadenfreude, Fox News was the only place to be on election night. From Karl Rove's refusal to believe the network's own projection that Mitt Romney had lost Ohio , to Bill O'Reilly's assertion that the  “white establishment is now the minority,” to Sarah Palin's enormous new Joan Collins hairdo, there was a panicked and slightly unhinged quality to the evening's proceedings. Not surprisingly, Jon Stewart had a field day with the material on Wednesday's “Daily Show.”  He was especially delighted by the fact that it was left to co-anchor Megyn Kelly to force Rove to face the music, via a long walk through the bowels of the Fox News offices and a meeting with their in-house nerds.
NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- Supporters who want to spend election night with President Obama can earn a ticket with a chore: two days of door-knocking to help turn out the vote in neighboring Wisconsin. Locking down Wisconsin's 10 electoral votes is an important part of Obama's path to victory, but it won't come easy. Both he and Republican Mitt Romney have their eyes on the state, home of Romney running mate Paul D. Ryan. But the tickets-for-chores scheme has worked for the Obama campaign before, putting more than 6,000 volunteers to work in the days before the Democratic National Convention in North Carolina.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Right after the television networks projected that he had won reelection, the first thing President Obama did was thank supporters - not with a statement to the media or in an email, but in a tweet. "We're all in this together. That's how we campaigned, and that's who we are. Thank you," Obama messaged his nearly 23 million followers on Twitter. In fewer than 140 characters, Obama showed just how profoundly the digital revolution had transformed the 2012 presidential election.
OPINION
November 15, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
It's a small matter, I know, compared with the historic issues now obsessing the commentariat, such as the fiscal cliff and how many mistresses and admirers David H. Petraeus could keep in the air simultaneously. But before we say goodbye to Campaign 2012, I would just like to point out that the entire drama of a close election, as played out in the media on election night, is basically fake. Like broadcasters presenting baseball games in the early days of radio, the television networks know who's going to win the game and more or less how it's going to play out, inning by inning.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
From "America's Election Headquarters" (a.k.a. Fox News) early last week, Charles Krauthammer declared that the Obama agenda was dead; the only question being how much of it would eventually be repealed. Two hours earlier, Fox News had projected a Republican takeover of the House of Representatives, drawing the ire of many (mostly Democratic) politicians and pundits who protested that polls had not closed in many states. It was that kind of night at the news network that many saw as being much more of a participant than a mere chronicler of this year's election.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Forget the bunting and confetti, the balloons and the funny hats. The new symbol of the American election is the oversize touch pad. During the 2008 election, CNN unveiled its "magic wall" and made John King, his fingertips whisking states red and blue, the hippest geek of presidential politics. Four years later, election night 2012 was a visual monument to the iPad generation, with all the major news networks sporting maps equipped with similar wizardry. CNN, MSNBC and Fox News reported returns with speed guaranteed to please the most app-addicted, devoting far more time to CG-heavy demographic deconstruction than to the traditional talking-head gab fest.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Join "The Newsroom" star Olivia Munn and Times staff writer Patrick Kevin Day on Friday at noon for a discussion of the HBO series, which returns for its second season July 14. Munn plays Sloan Sabbith, a socially awkward financial analyst with "News Night," the nightly news program anchored by testy anchor Will McAvoy (played by Jeff Daniels). When the series returns, it will be a year after the events of last season, bringing the "News Night" staff to the final days before election night 2012.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2013 | By Maeve Reston and Marisa Gerber
City Councilman Eric Garcetti's supporters began filling up the Hollywood Palladium theater long before the first results were released, as the Los Angeles mayoral hopeful awaited returns with his family at a nearby hotel. The choice of the cavernous venue - the campaign was expecting several thousand supporters Tuesday night - was a hint of the team's optimism about their chances. While his opponent, City Controller Wendy Greuel, stumbled in her fundraising efforts in the final days, Garcetti's campaign was comparatively flush, aides close to Garcetti said, to outgun her in advertising and get-out-the-vote efforts that will be crucial in a low-turnout race.
OPINION
May 21, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
With any luck, the campaign for mayor of Los Angeles will end Tuesday in a decisive victory for one candidate or the other. Then the winner can begin the task of building an administration and filling the ranks of commission appointments that will form the city's leadership core for the next four - or possibly eight - years. But this is a close race, and many residents have voted by mail or will cast ballots provisionally or by other means rather than simply going to a polling place and inking the ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2013 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
After a contest for mayor of Los Angeles that has consumed the better part of two years, the two finalists, their staffs, the media and a largely disinterested electorate doubtless would welcome an end to the drama Tuesday, election day. But the large number of Angelenos voting by mail, the apparent tightness of the race and the peculiarities of the City Clerk's ballot-counting procedures open the possibility that the winner might not be known for...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan
Three weeks after the Los Angeles primary election, the city will announce the final vote count Tuesday in races for mayor, City Council and other local offices. For candidates in an Eastside council race, the final tally for the primary could make the difference between outright victory or a runoff on May 21. The initial result found former state Sen. Gil Cedillo falling less than a percentage point below the majority that a candidate needs to avoid a runoff. If Cedillo fails to exceed 50% in the final count, his runoff opponent will be Jose Gardea, chief of staff to Councilman Ed Reyes.
OPINION
March 7, 2013 | Jim Newton
The first round of the mayoral election ended Tuesday much the way it began, with Controller Wendy Greuel and Councilman Eric Garcetti fighting for the lead while facing the complicated task of defining themselves to voters and assembling a majority in an exceptionally diverse city. Both candidates have logical routes forward for the runoff, and both can look to historical precedent for proof they might win. Greuel can take heart from the election of 2001, when Jim Hahn came in second in the first round of the election but rebounded to victory in the runoff after moderates who'd voted for other candidates in the first round picked him over Antonio Villaraigosa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1996 | CATHY WERBLIN
Local candidates and the public will gather at the Community Meeting Center, 11300 Stanford Ave., on election night to watch election results. The city-sponsored event will begin at 8:30 p.m. and provide up-to-the-minute election results, a live cablecast of candidate interviews and a review of the issues. City officials plan to keep a running total of the votes that each federal, state and local candidate receives. The Garden Grove Cable Television Corp. will televise the meeting between 9 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1994 | JOHN POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In what could be the end to one of the most chaotic elections in Long Beach history, the City Council on Tuesday declared contractor Mike Donelon the winner by two votes in a June 7 council race that he initially appeared to have lost. The council voted 7 to 1 to certify Donelon's win over Tonia Reyes Uranga, whose lead vanished when several extra ballots were discovered during a June 22 recount. Councilman Warren Harwood voted against the certification, and Councilman Les Robbins was absent.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
You remember Karl Rove: He's the Republican strategist and Fox News contributor who made television history last month when he refused to accept that President Obama had won the state of Ohio and effectively clinched the entire election, leading to a showdown between Megyn Kelly and the behind-the-scenes statisticians on the network's “Decision Desk.” If a report out Wednesday from Gabriel Sherman at New York magazine is to be believed,...
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
For most Americans, interest in the results of the 2012 presidential campaign ended somewhere around the first election night projections for President Obama and the brief, stunned concession speech delivered by a gobsmacked Mitt Romney. But for a small group of obsessives, the political equivalent of those who devour box scores for breakfast, a fascinating and welcome service has come from David Wasserman, a youthful and whip-smart campaign analyst with the Cook Political Report, who has become a one-man clearinghouse for presidential tabulations across the country.
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