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Election Workers

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NATIONAL
March 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Two county election workers were sentenced Tuesday to 18 months in prison for rigging a recount of 2004 presidential election ballots so they could avoid a longer, more detailed review. Jacqueline Maiden, 60, a Cuyahoga County election coordinator who was the board's third-highest ranking employee, and ballot manager Kathleen Dreamer, 40, each were convicted of a felony count of negligent misconduct of an elections employee.
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WORLD
March 29, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - Suicide bombers dressed as women broke into a private home on Saturday and began firing rocket-propelled grenades at their target next door: the headquarters of Afghanistan's Independent Election Commission, the latest insurgent assault on this country's closely watched presidential vote. The attackers died but there were no other reports of fatalities. Two police officers were wounded in the assault, which lasted for more than five hours, officials said. Taliban insurgents claimed responsibility in what has become an all too familiar occurrence in Afghanistan's capital one week before a pivotal election to choose President Hamid Karzai's successor.
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WORLD
October 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Police detained seven suspects for questioning in the kidnapping of three United Nations election workers in Kabul, the Afghan capital, officials said. Foreign aid workers were warned to restrict their movements. The victims have been identified as male Philippine diplomat Angelito Nayan and two women, Shqipe Hebibi of Kosovo and Annetta Flanigan of Northern Ireland. Officials said no demands had been received.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Joseph Tanfani
TAMPA, Fla. -- On Wednesday morning, after another election meltdown in Miami, the result of the presidential race in Florida was still uncertain. By dawn, all precincts in the state had finished reporting, and the totals gave an edge of more than 46,000 votes for President Obama -- about a half-percent. But a number of counties had not yet counted their absentee ballots. In Miami-Dade, election workers still had to count 20,000 absentees. In Pinellas County, which includes St. Petersburg, there were about 9,000 absentees yet to be counted.
NEWS
November 9, 1996 | Associated Press
Election workers began a painstaking recount Friday of 287,580 ballots using their fingernails and tweezers. The recount was undertaken in Salt Lake County after it was discovered that some of the punch-card ballots were not punched all the way through when voters poked them with a stylus. As a result, a scanner used to read the ballots did not record the votes.
NEWS
January 21, 1995 | SHELBY GRAD and ALAN EYERLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than two months after Election Day, about 3,600 temporary workers for the registrar of voters office still haven't been paid for their services because of the county's bankruptcy. "Those bills are tied up in the bankruptcy," county Registrar Donald Tanney said Friday. "At this point and time, it's impossible to know when that payroll will be paid." About half of the roughly 7,000 people who worked Election Day have not received their pay. The other workers got checks just before the Dec.
NEWS
April 30, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country's historic elections seemed doomed at 3:30 a.m. one day this week when a convoy of trucks carrying thousands of newly printed ballots stopped on the outskirts of this volatile black township to ask an army patrol for an escort. The third and final day of the election, Thursday, was about to dawn. Many of the 16 polling stations in Thokoza had yet to see a ballot; tens of thousands of angry voters had been turned away.
WORLD
July 5, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In elections marred by violence, intimidation and the growing influence of drug traffickers, Mexicans chose governors or other local officials in 14 states Sunday. Preliminary results Monday showed the opposition Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) winning most governorships but failing to alter its overall hold on power. President Felipe Calderon's National Action Party, in alliance with leftist parties, stunned the PRI by winning in two of its historic bastions, Oaxaca and Puebla, according to preliminary results.
NEWS
March 14, 1989
Leftist rebels in El Salvador dynamited an election center near San Salvador, the capital, and threatened to target election workers unless they resign. The rebel Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front, which has called for a boycott of the March 19 presidential election, also repeated its warning for vehicles to stay off roads.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | Associated Press
Gov. Joe Frank Harris has signed into law a measure relieving Georgia elections officials of the chore of counting write-in votes for Mickey Mouse and other non-existent candidates. The new law stipulates that election workers will not have to count write-in votes for any candidate who fails to serve notice of his write-in candidacy at least 20 days before the election.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2012 | By Joseph Tanfani, Washington Bureau
MIAMI - Not so long ago, in the days of the hanging chad and the butterfly ballot, a nation was held hostage by one state's electoral dysfunction. On Wednesday, America once again woke up the morning after election day to reports of voters in South Florida standing in line at midnight, tens of thousands of absentee ballots still unopened and uncounted, and no way of knowing who won the state's 29 electoral votes. Unlike Bush vs. Gore in 2000, at least the whole election isn't hanging in the balance, but the question is the same: Just what is it about Florida and elections, anyway?
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
Voting rights advocates described the election in New Jersey on Tuesday as a "catastrophe," and said significant problems were also cropping up in Ohio, Florida and Pennsylvania, among other places, although it was not possible to immediately verify all of those reports. In New Jersey, problems stemming from super storm Sandy caused election computers to crash and some polling places were not able to open by late morning, according to Barbara Arnwine, executive director of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. She also said some poll workers were demanding identification from voters, in violation of state law. "There is just a word -- just one word -- to describe the situation around New Jersey, and that is catastrophe," Arnwine said in a teleconference that included representatives of a broad coalition of voting rights and civil rights advocates.The problems were not evident at precincts observed by Times' reporters in New Jersey.
NEWS
November 4, 2012 | By David Lauter and Joseph Tanfani
WASHINGTON - The election is still two days away, but in the always-strange state of Florida, early voting is already leading to confusion and chaos.   In Miami-Dade County, elections officials reopened a voting office on Sunday only to shut the operation down in the early afternoon because too many people were waiting in line. After angry voters started chanting “Let us vote,” the election workers decided to reopen, calling in extra staff and another printer for the absentee ballots.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
Peg Rosenfield has been monitoring elections for the League of Women Voters in Ohio for almost 40 years and has seen just about every voting glitch imaginable. She says there's a saying among election workers: "Please, God, make it a landslide. " In a landslide, there is no quibbling over hanging chads or provisional ballots or registration requirements or rigged voting machines or whether ballots were cast by the dead. A winner is declared, a loser concedes - election over. No one expects a landslide when Americans go to the polls on Tuesday.
WORLD
July 5, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In elections marred by violence, intimidation and the growing influence of drug traffickers, Mexicans chose governors or other local officials in 14 states Sunday. Preliminary results Monday showed the opposition Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) winning most governorships but failing to alter its overall hold on power. President Felipe Calderon's National Action Party, in alliance with leftist parties, stunned the PRI by winning in two of its historic bastions, Oaxaca and Puebla, according to preliminary results.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County elections officials said Tuesday they have been able to count most of the Feb. 5 presidential primary ballots that had been set aside because some voters found them confusing. Acting Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk Dean Logan had said that about 50,000 votes were not counted after independent voters failed to mark a bubble indicating they wanted to vote in the Democratic or American Independent party primaries. Over the weekend, an additional 10,000 absentee and provisional ballots were processed, Logan said during an appearance before the county Board of Supervisors.
WORLD
November 26, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Haiti's electoral board again postponed the first election since the early 2004 ouster of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, saying it needed more time to organize the vote. The nine-member Provisional Electoral Council set Jan. 8 as the new date for presidential and legislative elections, followed by a Feb. 15 runoff. Council members said they would be unable to set up polling sites by Dec.
WORLD
November 10, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Russia has sharply reduced the number of European monitors permitted to observe upcoming parliamentary elections and has imposed restrictions that may impede the ability of opposition parties to run successful campaigns, one of Europe's main monitoring delegations said Friday. An assessment in advance of the Dec. 2 vote by a delegation of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe raises questions about whether political opponents can counter President Vladimir V.
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