YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsElection


December 14, 2012 | By Dan Turner
The 2012 election was one of the most anticlimactic races of modern times. As donors shattered records on political contributions, an Internet-dominated political media environment seized on every candidate misstatement as a top news story and a massively polarized electorate squabbled throughout, one could have been forgiven for thinking major changes would be afoot after November. But then, almost inexplicably given the country's dissatisfaction with the state of the economy and a gridlocked Congress that seemed incapable of doing anything about it, voters largely opted to keep the status quo. Barack Obama will serve another term as president, the Senate remains in Democratic hands and the House is still controlled by Republicans, an outcome that pretty much guarantees more of the same.
April 8, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Parti Quebecois suffered its worst provincial election defeat in 44 years on Monday, spurring debate throughout Canada on whether the party's signature goal of Quebec independence is dead. Politicians and pundits took to the airwaves Tuesday to proclaim the separatist movement an idea whose time has come and gone. Parti Quebecois won only 25% of the provincial parliament vote, weighed down by a prominent candidate's vow to stage another referendum on separation despite what pollsters say is a two-thirds majority of Quebec voters opposed to the idea.
December 19, 2012 | By Barbara Demick and Jung-yoon Choi, Los Angeles Times
SEOUL - Park Geun-hye, the daughter of the strongman who ruled South Korea for much of the 1960s and 1970s, was elected Wednesday as the country's first female president after a divisive, hotly contested election. Park, a member of the conservative New Frontier ruling party, has been a legislator since 1998. But her claim to fame before now came from her father, Park Chung-hee, who seized power in 1961 in a military coup and led the country until his assassination in 1979. Park, whose mother was killed in 1974, served as de facto first lady at state functions for the last five years of her father's presidency.
September 29, 2012 | By James Rainey
I don't know why anyone would want to call the presidential race over. We haven't even had a single debate. The fun is just starting. But in the last week we've had a few commentators and politicos say they already know the outcome. None of them stepped out of their predictable ideological silos, so the early prognostications didn't make much news. But here they are: -- Cenk Uygur, host of Current TV's “The Young Turks,” said this week that “barring a major miracle, I'm calling the election right now. It's already over.” The liberal  outlet, founded by Al Gore, has supported President Obama all along.
June 11, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels
TEHRAN -- Leading reformist candidate Mohammad Reza Aref announced Tuesday that he was dropping out of the race to be Iran's next president , leaving centrist Hassan Rowhani as the sole moderate-leaning candidate in Friday's election. There had been earlier calls for Aref, a former vice president, to step aside to strengthen Rowhani's chances. Aref said former President Mohammad Khatami, a reformist, had urged him to withdraw.   Rowhani, 65, who previously headed Iran's nuclear negotiating team, is the only cleric among the eight presidential candidates vetted by the powerful Guardian Council.
June 28, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
While some in the press press the president about coffin nails, and the 24/7 infotainment machine has moved on to celebrity obits and sex scandal, much of the world is still focusing on the Iranian election. Beirut's Bleibel (Hassan Bleibel) artfully reduces Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to a ballot-box padlock, while Moscow's Tunin (Sergei Tunin) frames him followed by fatal footsteps. Nairobi's Gado (Godfrey Mwampembwa) initiates him into an inauspicious gathering of the suspicious.
Los Angeles Times Articles