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Elections 1999

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1999 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year from now, Los Angeles County voters will help choose the next leader of the free world. But today, people will cast ballots on issues that cut closer to home: special taxes and bond measures, small city elections, and races in water districts, community college boards and school boards. Some of the races are rife with controversy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1999 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year from now, Los Angeles County voters will help choose the next leader of the free world. But today, people will cast ballots on issues that cut closer to home: special taxes and bond measures, small city elections, and races in water districts, community college boards and school boards. Some of the races are rife with controversy.
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BUSINESS
August 19, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kohl Rejects Tax Cuts: German Chancellor Helmut Kohl said cutting taxes is out of the question since the government has already squeezed all the savings it can out of its budget. "I cannot lower taxes, and will do so under no circumstances if it leads to an increase in the national debt," Kohl told German television. "And we have reached a limit as far as savings goes."
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Parliament confirmed one of President Leonid D. Kuchma's closest allies, Valery Pustovoitenko, as prime minister Wednesday, marking the seventh change of government since this former Soviet republic declared independence nearly six years ago. Pustovoitenko, who supports private enterprise, lower taxes and paying overdue state wages that now total $2.1 billion, was approved by a vote of 226 to 91.
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
This country adopted a new constitution Wednesday that guarantees equal rights for all and completes South Africa's official transformation from the injustice of apartheid to democracy. The Constitutional Assembly voted 421 to 2 to pass the 150-page document. There were 10 abstentions. "Our pledge is: Never and never again shall the laws of our land rend our people apart or legalize their oppression and repression," President Nelson Mandela said.
OPINION
November 27, 2002
The poor showing of the extremist Austrian Freedom Party, which won only 10% of the vote in national elections Sunday, is a big setback for the European far right. The party's chameleon-like leader, Joerg Haider, has been a symbol to anti-immigrant parties across Europe, but his party's collapse suggests that though ugly vestiges of Europe's past will always remain, the basic stability of Western European democracy is proving itself.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2001 | From Associated Press and Bloomberg News
--News of an international bailout plan for Argentina sent the nation's stocks soaring Wednesday and left President Fernando de la Rua upbeat about the country's debt crisis. But anti-government marchers returned to the streets just hours after the International Monetary Fund extended $8 billion to Argentina late Tuesday. Protesters said they remained concerned about the lack of signs of an economic recovery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2004 | From Associated Press
Gen. Leonardus Benyamin Murdani, an Indonesian military hero who led the invasions of West Papua and East Timor and forged close ties with the U.S. military, died Sunday. He was 74. The retired four-star general died at Jakarta's Gatot Subroto military hospital from complications after a stroke, hospital staff said. Murdani, who was from the Central Javanese town of Solo, entered the military soon after Indonesia's 1945-49 war of independence against the Dutch.
NEWS
July 25, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Critics of Megawati Sukarnoputri like to say she is merely a housewife with a famous name who enjoys gardening, shopping and watching cartoons. When she served as vice president, then-President Abdurrahman Wahid publicly called her "stupid." Other detractors dubbed her "Miniwati." But today her foes are calling her something else: president. Megawati, 54, the quiet, matronly daughter of Indonesia's founding president, Sukarno, was sworn in Monday as the nation's fifth head of state.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months after the fall of President Suharto, Indonesian lawmakers met Tuesday to exorcise the past and implement reforms that could bring democracy to the world's fourth-most-populous country. At stake, political analysts said, is nothing less than Indonesia's survival as a viable nation: The return of foreign capital, the cessation of civil strife and the aspirations of more than 200 million people all depend on the policies the legislators intend to adopt by week's end.
NEWS
March 18, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this decade's first favorable election showing for Central American leftists, Salvadoran guerrillas-turned-politicians took control of the country's major city halls and positioned themselves to vie with the extreme right wing for control of the Legislative Assembly.
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