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Elections 2008

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October 25, 2008 | Michelle Quinn, Quinn is a Times staff writer.
Apple Inc. said Friday that it was donating $100,000 to fight the proposed ban on same-sex marriages in California, taking a rare political stand that may win over some customers and irk others. The computer and gadget maker joined such companies as Google Inc., Qualcomm Inc. and Pacific Gas & Electric Co. in declaring opposition to Proposition 8, which would define marriage as only between a man and woman.
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July 13, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas and Christi Parsons, Tribune Washington Bureau
Democratic strategists looking to stave off major losses in the upcoming midterm election have devised a precise and targeted role for President Obama: recapturing the enthusiasm he generated as a fresh-faced candidate vying to become the nation's first black president. The assignment comes midway into Obama's first term and at a point when his job approval rating has dwindled. Democrats eager to preserve their majority in Congress have faced a delicate dilemma in deciding how to deploy the president.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2008 | Dan Morain and Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writers
The campaigns for and against Proposition 8 have raised a combined $30 million, with donations given in support of the proposed ban on gay marriage running considerably ahead of those to the opposition. So far, the main group promoting the constitutional amendment, which would overturn a recent California Supreme Court ruling that legalized same-sex marriage, has raised $17.8 million. The main No-on-8 campaign has raised $12.4 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2008 | Jennifer Oldham, Oldham is a Times staff writer.
Even after he records the final results from Tuesday's historic presidential election, Los Angeles County's election czar isn't likely to get any rest. When he's done counting roughly 16% of the ballots left over from Nov. 4, Dean Logan, the county's registrar-recorder, will turn his attention toward improving the democratic process for the next generation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2008 | Howard Blume and Jason Song, Blume and Song are Times staff writers.
It wasn't Los Angeles County's 23 school bonds that drove people to the polls Tuesday, but voters willingly added all of them to the Barack Obama victory parade. Despite a long ballot, national economic duress and competing tax measures, most of the bonds easily cruised to victory, including the largest ever for a California school district: the $7-billion Measure Q for Los Angeles Unified. It won support from 68.9% of voters. (The bonds needed 55% to pass.) Similar good fortune befell the $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2008 | Jennifer Oldham, Oldham is a Times staff writer.
Even after he records the final results from Tuesday's historic presidential election, Los Angeles County's election czar isn't likely to get any rest. When he's done counting roughly 16% of the ballots left over from Nov. 4, Dean Logan, the county's registrar-recorder, will turn his attention toward improving the democratic process for the next generation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2008 | Steve Chawkins, Chawkins is a Times staff writer.
Sacramento made a former NBA star its first African American mayor and San Francisco proved it's not quite the anything-goes place that both its fans and foes depict. In San Francisco, voters Tuesday decisively turned down the chance to become the first major city in the United States with legalized prostitution. And, by a margin of 2 to 1, they thumped a plan to rename a sewage plant after George W. Bush -- a prospect that critics saw as demeaning to the city and unfair to the plant's workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2008 | Tony Barboza, Barboza is a Times staff writer.
Drive-through voting? Casting ballots at the mall? While other counties struggle to get out absentee ballots and early voting in Los Angeles means queuing up outside the registrar's office in Norwalk, Orange County is pushing into the far reaches of voter convenience. One can vote at the mall or the airport. On election day there will be special registrar "SWAT teams" within six minutes of polling places to settle any problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2008 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
To partisans, they are "Phony Tony" and "Taxin' Jackson." Tony Strickland, 38, might call himself the alternative energy executive, detractors say, but he's still the same right-wing Republican who consistently voted against the environment during his days in the California Assembly. And Hannah-Beth Jackson? The 58-year-old Democrat is so liberal that she's never seen a tax she didn't like, according to Strickland's supporters. Voters couldn't have a clearer choice, both sides say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2008 | John L. Mitchell, Times Staff Writer
When it came time to make his endorsement in the hot race to succeed Los Angeles County Supervisor Yvonne B. Burke, Sheriff Lee Baca didn't pick just one candidate to fill the 2nd District seat. He picked two. His selection of both state Sen. Mark Ridley-Thomas (D-Los Angeles) and Los Angeles City Councilman Bernard C. Parks -- widely considered the two leading contenders -- was not a matter of hedging his bet in the June 3 race, a Baca spokesman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy, McGreevy is a Times staff writer.
Democratic hopes of ending budget gridlock in Sacramento by winning a super majority in the state Legislature fell short Wednesday even though their presidential candidate, Barack Obama, took more than 60% of California's vote. With some votes still uncounted, the party appears to have gained two seats in the Assembly. It needed six to reach the two-thirds majority required to pass a state spending plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2008 | Howard Blume and Jason Song, Blume and Song are Times staff writers.
It wasn't Los Angeles County's 23 school bonds that drove people to the polls Tuesday, but voters willingly added all of them to the Barack Obama victory parade. Despite a long ballot, national economic duress and competing tax measures, most of the bonds easily cruised to victory, including the largest ever for a California school district: the $7-billion Measure Q for Los Angeles Unified. It won support from 68.9% of voters. (The bonds needed 55% to pass.) Similar good fortune befell the $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2008 | Steve Chawkins, Chawkins is a Times staff writer.
Sacramento made a former NBA star its first African American mayor and San Francisco proved it's not quite the anything-goes place that both its fans and foes depict. In San Francisco, voters Tuesday decisively turned down the chance to become the first major city in the United States with legalized prostitution. And, by a margin of 2 to 1, they thumped a plan to rename a sewage plant after George W. Bush -- a prospect that critics saw as demeaning to the city and unfair to the plant's workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2008
PRESIDENT -- 100% precincts reporting Votes % Barack Obama (D) 6,308,015 61 John McCain (R) 3,849,023 37 Ralph Nader (I) 80,991 1 Bob Barr (NL) 51,094 1 Alan Keyes (AI) 30,582 0 Cynthia McKinney (G) 28,429 0 -- -- 100% precincts reporting Votes % Barack Obama (D) 1,845,726 69 John McCain (R) 766,164 29 Ralph Nader (I) 21,367 1 Bob Barr (NL) 13,214 0 Cynthia McKinney (G) 8,697 0 Alan Keyes (AI) 7,085 0 -- -- 100% precincts reporting Votes % John McCain (R) 430,360 51 Barack Obama (D)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2008 | Martha Groves, Groves is a Times staff writer.
The contentious fight over a Beverly Hills ballot measure has taken a strange turn with an advertisement in a local newspaper suggesting that a staunch opponent of the Beverly Hilton's proposed expansion had switched sides. But Councilwoman Nancy Krasne said she never changed her position and called the ad "despicable." The dispute centers around a note Krasne wrote to a Hilton executive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2008 | Tony Barboza, Barboza is a Times staff writer.
Drive-through voting? Casting ballots at the mall? While other counties struggle to get out absentee ballots and early voting in Los Angeles means queuing up outside the registrar's office in Norwalk, Orange County is pushing into the far reaches of voter convenience. One can vote at the mall or the airport. On election day there will be special registrar "SWAT teams" within six minutes of polling places to settle any problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2008 | Paloma Esquivel, Times Staff Writer
Today is the deadline for Californians to register to vote in the Feb. 5 election. The ballot features local and state measures and the presidential primary candidates. Normally, voters must register at least 15 days before an election, which would have made the deadline Monday. But it was extended to today because of the holiday commemorating the birth of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., said Kate Folmar, press secretary for Secretary of State Debra Bowen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2008 | GEORGE SKELTON
There's something about these election years that end in 8. They tend to be historic, watershed elections in California or the nation. Or both. Odds are in 2008 we'll elect either the first female or the first African American president. If not, it's likely to be the first Mormon or the oldest. (But not the first POW. That was Andrew Jackson.) Glance back several decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2008 | Jennifer Oldham and Ruben Vives, Oldham and Vives are Times staff writers.
Thousands of Los Angeles County voters may not receive their mail-in ballots in time to actually mail them in, county officials said Wednesday. Clerks were racing to process about 13,000 last-minute vote-by-mail applications while also handling 55,000 remaining voter registrations, said Los Angeles County Registrar Dean Logan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2008 | Tony Barboza, Barboza is a Times staff writer.
Irvine is perhaps best known for its master-planned villages, business prowess and designation as the nation's safest city of its size, four years running. In other words, the type of community where you'd expect to find everything running smoothly. But that prosperous tranquillity does not extend to City Hall, which has a reputation for bitter and divisive politics.
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