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Elections 2010

OPINION
September 27, 2011 | Jonah Goldberg
"You woke the bears! Why did you do that?" That's from one of my favorite scenes in "Anchorman. " In the Oscar-robbed film, Ron Burgundy (played by Will Ferrell) loudly leaps into a bear pit to rescue his girlfriend and then falsely blames her for waking them up. Watching President Obama these days reminds me of that scene. In March 2010, liberal columnist Peter Beinart argued that, for decades, Democratic politicians treated America's innate conservatism like a slumbering bear: If you make no sudden moves and talk quietly, you can get a lot done.
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OPINION
March 16, 2014 | Doyle McManus
This year was always going to be a difficult one for Democrats, as they battle to keep their five-seat majority in the Senate. But in recent months, the political landscape has grown bleaker. Let's start with the basics: Democrats have more seats at risk this year than Republicans do. Of the 36 Senate seats up for election (including three midterm vacancies), 21 are held by Democrats. And seven of those Democratic seats are in Republican-leaning "red states" that Mitt Romney won in 2012: Alaska, Arkansas, Louisiana, Montana, North Carolina, South Dakota and West Virginia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Richard Winton, Seema Mehta and Abby Sewell
With Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca announcing that he will retire at the end of the month, a political scramble was underway to lead the troubled agency. One of his top assistants said Tuesday he is now running for sheriff. "My calling card will be back to basics," said Todd Rogers, describing his campaign to lead the department. "There has been catastrophic failure of leadership in the Sheriff's Department," he said, adding that Baca was poorly served by some of his assistants.
WORLD
April 2, 2012 | Gabrielle Paluch and Mark Magnier
The people of Myanmar got their first taste of democracy in two decades Sunday, with unofficial results showing they had elected popular opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi to parliament in the process that ushered in a new era for the long-isolated Southeast Asian nation. Despite Suu Kyi's larger-than-life presence in Myanmar, also known as Burma, the apparent victory marks the first time she will hold office; she was under house arrest during general elections in 1990 and the tainted elections of 2010.
WORLD
December 26, 2009 | By Ken Ellingwood
Abortion rights activists dreamed of legislative victories across Mexico after the Supreme Court last year upheld a Mexico City law allowing abortion during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. Instead, the opposite has happened. In state after state, antiabortion forces have won changes to local constitutions declaring that life begins at conception and explicitly granting legal rights to the unborn. In all, 17 state legislatures have approved such measures, often with minimal debate, since the August 2008 court decision validating Mexico City's law. The Gulf coast state of Veracruz last month became the most recent state to do so. Its measure also called on the Mexican Congress to consider a similar amendment to the nation's Constitution.
OPINION
June 28, 2010 | Gregory Rodriguez
Irascible rednecks are nothing new in politics. Once upon a time, they tended to be either marginal firebrands like George Wallace or, more recently, the ne'er-do-well, embarrassing siblings of well-educated Southern pols — think Billy Carter or even Roger Clinton. But nowadays they seem to be the mainstream politicians themselves. In April, Haley Barbour, governor of Mississippi, former national GOP chairman and potential 2012 presidential candidate, referred to himself as "a fat redneck" on CNN's "John King USA."
WORLD
November 21, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
YANGON, Myanmar - Maung Thura, a comedian known as Zarganar, is a barrel of a man, stocky with a shaved head and a deep, forceful voice that seems out of place among the fluorescent lights and office furniture of the Home media group he recently helped found. Zarganar's biting wit and open criticism of repression in recent decades often irked Myanmar's government, which jailed him for 11 years on such charges as "public order offenses," including five spent in solitary confinement.
WORLD
May 11, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
In this cyclone-ravaged country where most people have more important things on their minds, like the daily struggle for fresh water, food and shelter, Myanmar's ruling generals sent their people to the polls Saturday to vote on a constitution that opponents call a cynical attempt to maintain the military government's grip on power.
WORLD
September 17, 2008 | Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writer
Members of Israel's ruling party head for the polls today to elect a new leader, pitting a top peace negotiator against a tough-talking former general in a race that could have profound implications for the future of the nation's political center. Outgoing Prime Minister Ehud Olmert has pledged to resign in the face of mounting corruption charges once the new Kadima party leader is elected.
WORLD
April 27, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon and Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The litany of abuses was chilling: mass murder, rape, sexual slavery. Forcing children to fight. Chopping off victims' limbs. Former Liberian President Charles Taylor's conviction Thursday by an international tribunal in the Netherlands on charges of abetting such war crimes in the West African country of Sierra Leone sent a powerful message to other warlords that they will eventually face justice, human rights activists and prosecutors say. But it also highlights what can be a wrenching tension between pursuing justice or peace first in some of the world's most violent, chaotic corners.
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