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Elections 2010

WORLD
December 27, 2009 | By Ken Ellingwood
Abortion rights activists dreamed of legislative victories across Mexico after the Supreme Court last year upheld a Mexico City law allowing abortion during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. Instead, the opposite has happened. In state after state, antiabortion forces have won changes to local constitutions declaring that life begins at conception and explicitly granting legal rights to the unborn. In all, 17 state legislatures have approved such measures, often with minimal debate, since the August 2008 court decision validating Mexico City's law. The Gulf coast state of Veracruz last month became the most recent state to do so. Its measure also called on the Mexican Congress to consider a similar amendment to the nation's Constitution.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2012 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
Filing has closed, the candidate lists are final and the curtain has risen on California's reconstructed political stage, where the contests for 153 congressional and legislative seats will play out for the first time under new rules and in altered districts. Look for intraparty fights that will last into the November runoffs, a likely lack of third-party candidates on the fall ballot and, possibly, a larger number of contested seats, compliments of a new primary system and a redrawing of political maps that did not seek to protect incumbents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Richard Winton, Seema Mehta and Abby Sewell
With Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca announcing that he will retire at the end of the month, a political scramble was underway to lead the troubled agency. One of his top assistants said Tuesday he is now running for sheriff. "My calling card will be back to basics," said Todd Rogers, describing his campaign to lead the department. "There has been catastrophic failure of leadership in the Sheriff's Department," he said, adding that Baca was poorly served by some of his assistants.
WORLD
May 16, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
Myanmar's ruling generals announced Thursday that a new constitution viewed by critics as a pro-government sham had been overwhelming approved by voters. The commission in charge of the Saturday referendum said 92.4% of voters approved the constitution, state-run media reported. The pro-democracy opposition says the new constitution will enshrine military rule.
WORLD
April 2, 2012 | Gabrielle Paluch and Mark Magnier
The people of Myanmar got their first taste of democracy in two decades Sunday, with unofficial results showing they had elected popular opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi to parliament in the process that ushered in a new era for the long-isolated Southeast Asian nation. Despite Suu Kyi's larger-than-life presence in Myanmar, also known as Burma, the apparent victory marks the first time she will hold office; she was under house arrest during general elections in 1990 and the tainted elections of 2010.
WORLD
August 31, 2009 | Mark Magnier
An uneasy calm settled over northern Myanmar today as Kokang fighters and refugees continued to cross the border into southern China in the wake of a military operation in the northern part of the country also known as Burma. U.N. and overseas Myanmar groups say upward of 10,000 refugees and hundreds of Kokang fighters are now in southern China, presenting a logistical headache for Beijing. Still unclear, analysts said, is whether this is only a lull in the fighting and how great an effect this human tide will have on Sino-Myanmar relations.
WORLD
March 1, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine -- Crimea's new pro-Moscow premier, Sergei Aksenov, moved the date of the peninsula's status referendum to March 30. On Thursday, the Crimean parliament, which appointed Aksenov,  had called for a referendum on May 25, the date also set for the urgent presidential election in Ukraine. “In connection with a necessity we decided to speed up the holding of the referendum on the stauts of the Autonomous Republic of the Crimea,” Aksenov said Saturday in Simferopol at a new government session, the UNIAN information agency reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi, Jack Leonard and Kate Mather
Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca announced Tuesday that he would not seek a fifth term in office and would instead retire at the end of the month. Baca - who spent 48 years with the department including 15 as sheriff - was at times emotional as he explained his decision, which he said he made three days ago. "I will go out on my terms," Baca, 71, said. "The reasons for doing so are so many, most personal and private. " FULL COVERAGE: L.A. Sheriff's Department hiring practices Baca insisted his decision to step down was "based on the highest of concern for the future of the Sheriff's Department.
WORLD
May 11, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
In this cyclone-ravaged country where most people have more important things on their minds, like the daily struggle for fresh water, food and shelter, Myanmar's ruling generals sent their people to the polls Saturday to vote on a constitution that opponents call a cynical attempt to maintain the military government's grip on power.
WORLD
November 21, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
YANGON, Myanmar - Maung Thura, a comedian known as Zarganar, is a barrel of a man, stocky with a shaved head and a deep, forceful voice that seems out of place among the fluorescent lights and office furniture of the Home media group he recently helped found. Zarganar's biting wit and open criticism of repression in recent decades often irked Myanmar's government, which jailed him for 11 years on such charges as "public order offenses," including five spent in solitary confinement.
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