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Elections 2010

WORLD
April 2, 2012 | Gabrielle Paluch and Mark Magnier
The people of Myanmar got their first taste of democracy in two decades Sunday, with unofficial results showing they had elected popular opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi to parliament in the process that ushered in a new era for the long-isolated Southeast Asian nation. Despite Suu Kyi's larger-than-life presence in Myanmar, also known as Burma, the apparent victory marks the first time she will hold office; she was under house arrest during general elections in 1990 and the tainted elections of 2010.
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WORLD
May 16, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
Myanmar's ruling generals announced Thursday that a new constitution viewed by critics as a pro-government sham had been overwhelming approved by voters. The commission in charge of the Saturday referendum said 92.4% of voters approved the constitution, state-run media reported. The pro-democracy opposition says the new constitution will enshrine military rule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2012 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
Filing has closed, the candidate lists are final and the curtain has risen on California's reconstructed political stage, where the contests for 153 congressional and legislative seats will play out for the first time under new rules and in altered districts. Look for intraparty fights that will last into the November runoffs, a likely lack of third-party candidates on the fall ballot and, possibly, a larger number of contested seats, compliments of a new primary system and a redrawing of political maps that did not seek to protect incumbents.
OPINION
March 16, 2014 | Doyle McManus
This year was always going to be a difficult one for Democrats, as they battle to keep their five-seat majority in the Senate. But in recent months, the political landscape has grown bleaker. Let's start with the basics: Democrats have more seats at risk this year than Republicans do. Of the 36 Senate seats up for election (including three midterm vacancies), 21 are held by Democrats. And seven of those Democratic seats are in Republican-leaning "red states" that Mitt Romney won in 2012: Alaska, Arkansas, Louisiana, Montana, North Carolina, South Dakota and West Virginia.
OPINION
June 28, 2010 | Gregory Rodriguez
Irascible rednecks are nothing new in politics. Once upon a time, they tended to be either marginal firebrands like George Wallace or, more recently, the ne'er-do-well, embarrassing siblings of well-educated Southern pols — think Billy Carter or even Roger Clinton. But nowadays they seem to be the mainstream politicians themselves. In April, Haley Barbour, governor of Mississippi, former national GOP chairman and potential 2012 presidential candidate, referred to himself as "a fat redneck" on CNN's "John King USA."
WORLD
January 23, 2013 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
AMMAN, Jordan - Jordan's parliamentary elections Wednesday crystallized the challenges facing King Abdullah II in his 13th year in power: Can he provide a government that is credible with his restive population and able to tackle the nation's serious economic woes and endemic corruption? At least 56% of the 2.3 million registered voters turned out, the nation's electoral commission said, in what some observers described as an endorsement of Abdullah's reform plans. The turnout topped the 53% for the parliamentary elections in 2010 even though several major parties boycotted the balloting.
WORLD
May 11, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
In this cyclone-ravaged country where most people have more important things on their minds, like the daily struggle for fresh water, food and shelter, Myanmar's ruling generals sent their people to the polls Saturday to vote on a constitution that opponents call a cynical attempt to maintain the military government's grip on power.
WORLD
September 17, 2008 | Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writer
Members of Israel's ruling party head for the polls today to elect a new leader, pitting a top peace negotiator against a tough-talking former general in a race that could have profound implications for the future of the nation's political center. Outgoing Prime Minister Ehud Olmert has pledged to resign in the face of mounting corruption charges once the new Kadima party leader is elected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
Only hours after FBI agents swept up 18 deputies and supervisors in a jail abuse and corruption case, Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca was being lauded at a $1,500-a-head downtown campaign fundraiser co-hosted by a former governor and a former L.A. city attorney. The contrasting images Monday - Baca somberly telling a crowded news conference it was a "sad day" for the agency he's led for 15 years and later celebrating his chances of winning a fifth term - captured both the increased vulnerability and time-tested resiliency of the county's top lawman at the threshold of another run for office.
WORLD
April 27, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon and Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The litany of abuses was chilling: mass murder, rape, sexual slavery. Forcing children to fight. Chopping off victims' limbs. Former Liberian President Charles Taylor's conviction Thursday by an international tribunal in the Netherlands on charges of abetting such war crimes in the West African country of Sierra Leone sent a powerful message to other warlords that they will eventually face justice, human rights activists and prosecutors say. But it also highlights what can be a wrenching tension between pursuing justice or peace first in some of the world's most violent, chaotic corners.
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