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Elections El Salvador

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1988 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A photographer whose work is being exhibited in the city-owned Los Angeles Photography Center has charged that his premier picture was censored because "it had a gun in it." The photograph, taken by Santa Barbara photographer Kevin McKiernan for an exhibit called "Images of Central America," shows Salvadoran voters in a 1984 election line next to a soldier with a machine gun over his shoulder.
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WORLD
March 14, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
For nearly three decades, Nestor Bonilla was a loyal soldier in the Salvadoran army. Trained by U.S. military advisors, he rose to the rank of colonel. He fought in the civil war as a commander of El Salvador's elite and feared special forces. Today he is stomping the campaign trail in behalf of the guerrilla movement he once battled. "It is time for a change," he says in what can only be called an understatement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1991
In answer to Salvadoran Ambassador Miguel Salverria's letter of April 22, I would like to say the following: My wife and I were in El Salvador on March 10 and observed the elections to which he refers. I spent most of the day in San Salvador, at four different sites. These are my observations and concerns: The set-up of the voting area did not adequately protect the voters' right to cast a secret ballot. I sidled up and was able to see how people marked their ballots. Instead of having an enclosed voting booth as we do in the U.S., they just have a 10-inch high partition around the top of the voting desk that anyone could easily see over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1991
In answer to Salvadoran Ambassador Miguel Salverria's letter of April 22, I would like to say the following: My wife and I were in El Salvador on March 10 and observed the elections to which he refers. I spent most of the day in San Salvador, at four different sites. These are my observations and concerns: The set-up of the voting area did not adequately protect the voters' right to cast a secret ballot. I sidled up and was able to see how people marked their ballots. Instead of having an enclosed voting booth as we do in the U.S., they just have a 10-inch high partition around the top of the voting desk that anyone could easily see over.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1989 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
CBS' prime-time news magazines go overseas this weekend to provide provocative insight into two war-ravaged lands. Tonight at 10 p.m. (2)(8), "West 57th" focuses on El Salvador on the eve of that country's presidential election. The right-wing Arena party, long associated with the infamous death squads, is expected to win the election just as leftist guerrillas are stepping up their efforts to topple the government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1989 | ARNOLDO VILLAFUERTE, Arnoldo Villafuerte is a businessman in San Salvador
On the sunny morning of this past Sunday, thousands of war-weary Salvadorans from all walks of life once again went quietly to cast their votes to elect a new president. Days before, the Marxist guerrillas of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation front had launched an attack against government targets, primarily high-tension towers and telephone equipment, leaving 90% of the country without water, light and telecommunications.
WORLD
March 14, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
For nearly three decades, Nestor Bonilla was a loyal soldier in the Salvadoran army. Trained by U.S. military advisors, he rose to the rank of colonel. He fought in the civil war as a commander of El Salvador's elite and feared special forces. Today he is stomping the campaign trail in behalf of the guerrilla movement he once battled. "It is time for a change," he says in what can only be called an understatement.
NEWS
March 17, 1988
Demonstrators opposed to Sunday's National Assembly and mayoral elections in El Salvador went on a stone-throwing, car-burning rampage in San Salvador after riot police fired tear-gas at them. About 1,000 students, teachers and university workers marched from the National University chanting "No to elections with repression!" The march began peacefully but turned violent when police lobbed tear gas after demonstrators tried to push past a line of officers outside the Treasury Ministry.
NEWS
April 3, 1985 | United Press International
The State Department today rejected charges that the local elections in El Salvador last weekend, which gave moderate President Jose Napoleon Duarte's party a clear majority, were rigged and said official U.S. observers saw nothing to indicate fraud. The charge was made by Roberto d'Aubuisson of the far-right Nationalist Republican Alliance and Raul Molina Martinez of the National Conciliation Party, who demanded Tuesday that the vote be overturned.
MAGAZINE
July 8, 1990
I agree Wilson is a man of ambition. But I disagree when you say he is not passionate in politics. You left out any mention of foreign policy. In 1985, Wilson came to speak to a scant crowd at Santa Monica College. I positioned myself in front to question him about the presidential elections in El Salvador and Nicaragua. When I spoke I pointed out that Nicaragua had completed a election that drew praise from around the world for its fairness. And that reports of the El Salvadoran elections were the opposite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1989 | ARNOLDO VILLAFUERTE, Arnoldo Villafuerte is a businessman in San Salvador
On the sunny morning of this past Sunday, thousands of war-weary Salvadorans from all walks of life once again went quietly to cast their votes to elect a new president. Days before, the Marxist guerrillas of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation front had launched an attack against government targets, primarily high-tension towers and telephone equipment, leaving 90% of the country without water, light and telecommunications.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1989 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
CBS' prime-time news magazines go overseas this weekend to provide provocative insight into two war-ravaged lands. Tonight at 10 p.m. (2)(8), "West 57th" focuses on El Salvador on the eve of that country's presidential election. The right-wing Arena party, long associated with the infamous death squads, is expected to win the election just as leftist guerrillas are stepping up their efforts to topple the government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1988 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A photographer whose work is being exhibited in the city-owned Los Angeles Photography Center has charged that his premier picture was censored because "it had a gun in it." The photograph, taken by Santa Barbara photographer Kevin McKiernan for an exhibit called "Images of Central America," shows Salvadoran voters in a 1984 election line next to a soldier with a machine gun over his shoulder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1997
Last month's legislative and mayoral elections in El Salvador provide optimism for the growth of democracy in that beleaguered Central American country. Salvadorans went to the polls and awarded a virtual tie to two parties that were radical enemies during the civil war of the 1980s. The leftist Farabundo Marti Front (FMLN) came out with 39% of the vote, nipping the ruling rightist Arena party of President Armando Calderon Sol by one percentage point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1991
While the results of the latest elections in El Salvador are in dispute due to troubling allegations of fraud, they may have already opened up the nation's troubled political system just enough to help end the civil war that has dragged on for almost a dozen years.
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