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NEWS
December 1, 1995 | From Associated Press
For the first time, a cash shortage will keep the Federal Election Commission from giving presidential candidates all the federal campaign dollars they are entitled to when the first checks are sent. Campaign officials estimate they may get as little as 60% of the federal matching funds due Jan. 2. The FEC says it will make good on the unpaid portion as soon as more tax dollars flow in early next year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 11, 2006
Re "Council Studies Election Financing," July 6 The "clean money" system the Los Angeles City Council is studying was criticized by some members as too expensive. Talk about penny-wise and pound-foolish. The few million dollars it would cost to finance municipal elections are nothing compared with the money saved when government is no longer beholden to special interests. If these interests didn't believe that financing campaigns would result in greater profits, they wouldn't give money in the first place.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1990 | LEN HALL
City Councilman Mike Eggers saw two things he didn't like in last November's elections. One was a councilman in a neighboring city being elected to a fourth straight term. The other was a councilwoman spending more than $30,000 to win a seat. As a result, Eggers has proposed two city ordinances he hopes will prevent those things from happening in Dana Point. One ordinance limits council members to two consecutive terms. The other would limit all campaign contributions to $100.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2006 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday inched closer to a controversial proposal to use taxpayer funds to fully finance municipal election campaigns, although some council members balked at the hefty price tag. Despite some members' misgivings about spending more taxpayer money for campaigns, the council voted unanimously to have its staff draft a measure that could be placed on the March ballot.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County elections are the envy of officials throughout the country. "Los Angeles is an extremely special case," said Michael Shamos, an attorney and computer expert who certifies electronic vote-tabulation systems for the state of Pennsylvania. "Nobody else spends that kind of money." The county elections budget for the 1988-89 fiscal year is $23.5 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city and county officials Tuesday reached tentative settlement in their dispute over election costs, paving the way for a June public vote on a sweeping city ethics reform package. The compromise was approved Tuesday by county supervisors in a closed-door meeting. It now goes to the City Council for expected approval. Under the tentative agreement, the county will withdraw its threat to bar the city from participating in the June 5 county-run election.
OPINION
July 11, 2006
Re "Council Studies Election Financing," July 6 The "clean money" system the Los Angeles City Council is studying was criticized by some members as too expensive. Talk about penny-wise and pound-foolish. The few million dollars it would cost to finance municipal elections are nothing compared with the money saved when government is no longer beholden to special interests. If these interests didn't believe that financing campaigns would result in greater profits, they wouldn't give money in the first place.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Senate prepares for a showdown over campaign finance reform, Democrats who have been the core supporters of a bill to ban unlimited donations to political parties are getting peppered by key allies with reasons to jump ship. Organized labor denounces provisions that it says would silence union voices during the height of campaigns--a criticism AFL-CIO leaders intend to spotlight at a news conference today.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Against long odds, a major campaign finance reform bill to ban unregulated and unlimited "soft money" contributions emerged intact in the House on Friday, withstanding weeks of assault choreographed by GOP leaders. The bipartisan legislation now is poised to win House approval Monday--a stunning testament to the staying power of an issue that reform foes steadfastly have denigrated. "People underestimated this bill," said Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1993 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Earlier this year, the price of democracy in Orange County was $231,000. That's how much it cost the county to hold a special election to fill the Garden Grove-based state Senate seat vacated when Ed Royce jumped up to Congress. But now Orange County may get a reprieve on that bill--as well as the cost of putting on special elections for years to come.
OPINION
December 11, 2005
The Times' editorial supporting the "clean money" bill ("Buying back government," Dec. 7) correctly identified public financing of election campaigns as the key factor in leading Sacramento out of its current morass of special interests. In fact, if the Legislature and governor are really going to start working together, as they promise, this is just the place to start. DAN SILVER Los Angeles I support public financing of state elections, but we need to roll back term limits at the same time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2003 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Ventura County supervisors Tuesday gave initial approval to a tough new ordinance that limits contributions to county election campaigns, expands financial reporting requirements and creates an ethics commission to go after violators. Supervisors voted 4 to 1 to approve the proposal in concept but agreed to delay a formal vote on the new law until next week. Supervisor Judy Mikels cast the dissenting vote.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Senate prepares for a showdown over campaign finance reform, Democrats who have been the core supporters of a bill to ban unlimited donations to political parties are getting peppered by key allies with reasons to jump ship. Organized labor denounces provisions that it says would silence union voices during the height of campaigns--a criticism AFL-CIO leaders intend to spotlight at a news conference today.
NEWS
June 30, 2000 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, rushing to embrace the first major change in campaign finance law in 21 years, gave final approval Thursday to a bill that would force disclosure of secret donors and the expenditures of a newly popular brand of tax-exempt political committee. The bill, approved 92 to 6 and sent to President Clinton for his expected signature, is narrow in scope and surely will not stop the flood of money into politics this election year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1999
The Justice Department on Tuesday announced the filing of criminal charges against Los Angeles businessman Robert S. Lee stemming from its probe of campaign finances leading up to the 1996 election. In a criminal information filed in U.S. District Court, Lee, 49, was charged with a misdemeanor violation of the Federal Election Campaign Act by giving the Democratic National Committee a $150,000 check drawn from an account entirely funded by a South Korean corporation.
NEWS
December 4, 1998 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The House Judiciary Committee abruptly dropped plans Thursday to include campaign financing in its impeachment inquiry, with the panel's chairman declaring that there is "more than adequate" information available on the Monica S. Lewinsky scandal to merit a continued push against President Clinton. In addition, the Senate majority leader gave his first indication that "it would be very hard not to" have a Senate trial to consider removing Clinton from office if he is impeached by the full House.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | JERRY GILLAM, Times Staff Writer
Proposals to rewrite the rules for financing California elections now appear to be on hold until next year, despite repeated pronouncements by powerful lawmakers that reform is needed to overcome the Legislature's tarnished image as "the best that money can buy."
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | SARA FRITZ and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Eager to put the defeat of his economic stimulus package behind him, President Clinton next week will unveil a campaign finance reform package that would ban contributions from lobbyists to any candidate for federal office, The Times has learned.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Against long odds, a major campaign finance reform bill to ban unregulated and unlimited "soft money" contributions emerged intact in the House on Friday, withstanding weeks of assault choreographed by GOP leaders. The bipartisan legislation now is poised to win House approval Monday--a stunning testament to the staying power of an issue that reform foes steadfastly have denigrated. "People underestimated this bill," said Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.).
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