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NEWS
March 30, 2000 |
Small groups of protesters blocked traffic and threw rocks at vehicles in parts of Port-au-Prince, in a third day of demonstrations over Haiti's election process. Many store owners refused to open their shops as protesters set up flaming tire barricades at intersections leading to the capital's downtown business district. Some protesters fired shots into the air in a midtown slum, and two cars were set afire on a seaside boulevard.
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WORLD
April 6, 2011 | By Allyn Gaestel, Los Angeles Times
Michel Martelly, the popular singer turned improbable candidate, was all but assured of becoming Haiti's next president Tuesday after his opponent's camp appeared to rule out challenging vote tallies issued a day earlier. Martelly, who ran as an outsider trumpeting change, sounded triumphant in his first public comments since preliminary results showed him easily defeating Mirlande Manigat, a university executive and former first lady. "You have chosen to break with our old quarrels, our artificial divisions, the prevailing negativity," Martelly told Haitians from the stage at a restaurant in Petionville, a wealthy suburb in the hills above the capital, Port-au-Prince.
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NEWS
July 14, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The military-led junta ignored an opposition deadline for it to resign Monday, and forces opposed to the Haitian government called for the renewal on Wednesday of a nationwide general strike. The "57 Organizations," a left-of-center coalition of activist and grass-roots groups, which has previously paralyzed the country with an on-and-off stoppage, said that on Wednesday "the strike will be resumed more stiffly." However, it did not indicate for how long.
OPINION
March 19, 2011
Haitians will head to the polls Sunday to elect a new president who, it is hoped, will begin to pull the country out of its perennial state of misery. But the obstacles are substantial. The impoverished Caribbean nation has been struggling to recover ever since a massive earthquake leveled much of it in January 2010. Today, millions remain homeless or living in tattered tents. A cholera epidemic has further crippled the already wounded nation. Botched elections in November, marred by significant fraud, led to this month's runoff, which will determine whether Michel Martelly, a popular musician, or Mirlande Manigat, a former first lady and academic, should lead the country.
OPINION
March 19, 2011
Haitians will head to the polls Sunday to elect a new president who, it is hoped, will begin to pull the country out of its perennial state of misery. But the obstacles are substantial. The impoverished Caribbean nation has been struggling to recover ever since a massive earthquake leveled much of it in January 2010. Today, millions remain homeless or living in tattered tents. A cholera epidemic has further crippled the already wounded nation. Botched elections in November, marred by significant fraud, led to this month's runoff, which will determine whether Michel Martelly, a popular musician, or Mirlande Manigat, a former first lady and academic, should lead the country.
NEWS
December 19, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Father Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the leftist Catholic priest who won Haiti's first fully free democratic election Sunday, remained in seclusion Tuesday, still a mystery to diplomats, political observers and others who wonder where he plans to take the strife-torn, impoverished country. The mild-mannered, 37-year-old pastor to the poor campaigned on a vague platform extolling Haitian self-sufficiency and promising justice, food and jobs to his followers.
WORLD
April 6, 2011 | By Allyn Gaestel, Los Angeles Times
Michel Martelly, the popular singer turned improbable candidate, was all but assured of becoming Haiti's next president Tuesday after his opponent's camp appeared to rule out challenging vote tallies issued a day earlier. Martelly, who ran as an outsider trumpeting change, sounded triumphant in his first public comments since preliminary results showed him easily defeating Mirlande Manigat, a university executive and former first lady. "You have chosen to break with our old quarrels, our artificial divisions, the prevailing negativity," Martelly told Haitians from the stage at a restaurant in Petionville, a wealthy suburb in the hills above the capital, Port-au-Prince.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing a swift tour of four Latin countries, Vice President Dan Quayle arrived in impoverished Haiti on Thursday with a plea and a blunt warning that unless its military allows free elections in November, it faces more cuts in foreign aid.
NEWS
December 20, 1987
Haiti's ruling military junta issued a new election law that would bar observers from voting stations and require voters to hand ballots to polling officials instead of depositing them in a sealed box. The law, announced on state television, would apply initially to the Jan. 17 presidential election that was scheduled after the Nov. 29 elections, Haiti's first in 30 years, were canceled because of violence. The junta leader, Lt. Gen.
NEWS
August 14, 1995 | Reuters
Voting in 41 local and parliamentary elections in Haiti got off to an orderly start Sunday, but turnout was low. Officials said most polling stations opened without incident in eight of Haiti's nine departments where voting was canceled or results destroyed in June elections. By noon, no more than 50 people had voted, they said.
NEWS
March 30, 2000 |
Small groups of protesters blocked traffic and threw rocks at vehicles in parts of Port-au-Prince, in a third day of demonstrations over Haiti's election process. Many store owners refused to open their shops as protesters set up flaming tire barricades at intersections leading to the capital's downtown business district. Some protesters fired shots into the air in a midtown slum, and two cars were set afire on a seaside boulevard.
NEWS
December 19, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Father Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the leftist Catholic priest who won Haiti's first fully free democratic election Sunday, remained in seclusion Tuesday, still a mystery to diplomats, political observers and others who wonder where he plans to take the strife-torn, impoverished country. The mild-mannered, 37-year-old pastor to the poor campaigned on a vague platform extolling Haitian self-sufficiency and promising justice, food and jobs to his followers.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing a swift tour of four Latin countries, Vice President Dan Quayle arrived in impoverished Haiti on Thursday with a plea and a blunt warning that unless its military allows free elections in November, it faces more cuts in foreign aid.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The military-led junta ignored an opposition deadline for it to resign Monday, and forces opposed to the Haitian government called for the renewal on Wednesday of a nationwide general strike. The "57 Organizations," a left-of-center coalition of activist and grass-roots groups, which has previously paralyzed the country with an on-and-off stoppage, said that on Wednesday "the strike will be resumed more stiffly." However, it did not indicate for how long.
NEWS
December 22, 1987
Conservative industrialist Thomas Desulme announced that he will not run in next month's rescheduled elections in Haiti, becoming the fifth candidate to withdraw from the violence-ridden presidential campaign. Desulme, 75, said his National Labor Party is withdrawing because the elections are no longer under the control of an independent commission. The military-led provisional government of Lt. Gen. Henri Namphy last month replaced the commission with a new council chosen by the government.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Election officials in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, postponed general elections that had been planned for November. The Electoral Council cited a shortage of money and equipment. It did not set a new election date but said voting will take place in time to inaugurate a president by Feb. 7, 1991. That date, previously planned for the inauguration, will be the fifth anniversary of the flight of dictator Jean-Claude (Baby Doc) Duvalier.
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