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Elections Indonesia

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NEWS
July 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A group of tiny parties refused to certify Indonesia's election results, forcing another delay in the long-awaited final tally of the June 7 parliamentary vote. Electoral officials had planned to announce the final results, but 27 out of 48 parties failed to sign off on them, saying the election was unfair. They have cited about 100,000 irregularities, which must now be addressed by an electoral watchdog body. Senior officials are split over whether the complaints are justified.
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NEWS
October 21, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdurrahman Wahid, a partly blind and frail Muslim cleric who previously had never run for political office, was elected Indonesia's president Wednesday in a stunning upset that steers the world's fourth most populous nation into uncharted waters. The powerful military immediately said it will support Wahid, who won this nation's first free presidential election in 44 years and was quickly sworn in. Wahid's defeated rival, Megawati Sukarnoputri, called on her supporters to respect the result.
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NEWS
March 12, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
President Suharto was sworn in for a fifth term Friday and a tussle over Indonesia's vice presidency was settled at the last minute with the dramatic withdrawal of a minor party challenger. Suharto, 66, pledged in his inaugural speech to the 1,000-member People's Consultative Assembly to serve the full five years of his term to complete "the task of history which is to usher our nation into the takeoff stage" of development.
NEWS
July 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A group of tiny parties refused to certify Indonesia's election results, forcing another delay in the long-awaited final tally of the June 7 parliamentary vote. Electoral officials had planned to announce the final results, but 27 out of 48 parties failed to sign off on them, saying the election was unfair. They have cited about 100,000 irregularities, which must now be addressed by an electoral watchdog body. Senior officials are split over whether the complaints are justified.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdurrahman Wahid, a partly blind and frail Muslim cleric who previously had never run for political office, was elected Indonesia's president Wednesday in a stunning upset that steers the world's fourth most populous nation into uncharted waters. The powerful military immediately said it will support Wahid, who won this nation's first free presidential election in 44 years and was quickly sworn in. Wahid's defeated rival, Megawati Sukarnoputri, called on her supporters to respect the result.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1996
We bought their elections: Nicaragua, Panama, et al. Now they are buying our elections: Indonesia, Britain, et al. Ah, the efficiency of globalization. JON OROS Los Angeles
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid intense talk of crises in Asia's economies, Myanmar's junta, Cambodia's elections, Indonesia's political upheaval and India's and Pakistan's nuclear programs, the foreign ministers from 21 countries broke Tuesday for a bit of slightly surreal and distinctly off-key levity from the former superpower rivals. Diplomatic detente temporarily turned into a love feast as Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and Russian Foreign Minister Yevgeny M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1998
Re your March 23 editorial: Supporting measures that supposedly "are meant to benefit the people of Cuba" (President Clinton's cosmetic gesture of removing sanctions he imposed in 1996, even as Washington's embargo remains intact), The Times in fact supports this action as an element to strengthen direct U.S. intervention in Cuba. That's what it means when your editorial hails Clinton's initiative as proof "that the United States is moving to pave the way for an eventual transition to democracy" in Cuba.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1999 | ANNA HUSARSKA, Anna Husarska is a fellow at the Media Studies Center in New York
Situated off the northern coast of Australia, East Timor, an island province under Indonesian rule, is six time zones away from Kosovo. But they have much in common. The international community is trying to stop a year-old civil war and 10 years of Serbian oppression in Kosovo and, at the same time, U.N.-sponsored talks also are in progress over how to put an end to 24 years of Indonesian oppression and armed struggle in East Timor.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1996 | TOM PETRUNO
Healthy economic growth isn't everything when it comes to fueling stock market gains. In fact, good growth hasn't counted for much of anything in Asia since 1993. For the third straight year, the majority of Asian stock markets are lagging far behind the U.S. market's gains. So far in 1996, only three Asian markets--Taiwan, Hong Kong and Malaysia--are beating the 13.9% gain in the U.S. Standard & Poor's 500-stock index.
NEWS
March 12, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
President Suharto was sworn in for a fifth term Friday and a tussle over Indonesia's vice presidency was settled at the last minute with the dramatic withdrawal of a minor party challenger. Suharto, 66, pledged in his inaugural speech to the 1,000-member People's Consultative Assembly to serve the full five years of his term to complete "the task of history which is to usher our nation into the takeoff stage" of development.
OPINION
November 21, 1999 | Donald K. Emmerson, Donald K. Emmerson, a senior fellow at Stanford University's Asia/Pacific Research Center, is editor and coauthor of "Indonesia beyond Suharto."
An Italian restaurant in San Francisco's North Beach district is an unlikely place to be served dinner by an activist from Aceh, the Indonesian province (pronounced "Ah-cheh") whose momentum toward independence is growing. He carried a business card identifying himself as an officer of the International Forum for Aceh. His card listed three electronic addresses, including one at the group's California headquarters in Oakland.
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