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Elections Israel

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NEWS
January 26, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Israel's political picture was brought a little more into focus Monday, at least for the moment, as two of the main candidates for prime minister firmed up their positions and came out swinging. Benjamin Netanyahu, the incumbent, easily won a primary within his Likud Party and formally emerged as its candidate for prime minister, television projections indicated. In so doing, the embattled leader, whose government fell Dec.
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WORLD
July 24, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM - There was no white smoke and little pomp, but a collection of religious and political leaders emerged Wednesday from a much-anticipated private meeting in a Jerusalem hotel to announce the election of Israel's next two chief rabbis, who will take their place among the nation's most influential religious figures. It was a bruising, sometimes ugly campaign in which many of the candidates were tainted by allegations of corruption, nepotism or racism, underscoring why the government-funded rabbinate has fallen so low in public opinion in recent years.
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NEWS
May 30, 1996
HISTORY: Israel was founded in 1948 after the Holocaust as a haven for Jews on part of what was their biblical homeland. At the time, the area was British-ruled Palestine and inhabited largely by Arabs, many of whom opposed a Jewish state. The Palestinians hope to establish their own state in the West Bank and Gaza as a result of Arab-Israeli peacemaking. LAND DISPUTE: In the 1967 Middle East war, Israel captured the West Bank, the Gaza Strip and the Golan Heights.
WORLD
February 11, 2009 | Ashraf Khalil
The weather at Razi Elementary School was depressing -- a driving winter rain mixed with occasional hail that soaked prospective voters as soon as they stepped out of their cars. Inside the school, local politicians fretted about the possibility of a record low turnout here in Israel's second-largest Arab city, and among Arab voters nationwide. On the streets, a protest against a right-wing Israeli politician serving as an election supervisor here briefly turned violent.
WORLD
July 24, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM - There was no white smoke and little pomp, but a collection of religious and political leaders emerged Wednesday from a much-anticipated private meeting in a Jerusalem hotel to announce the election of Israel's next two chief rabbis, who will take their place among the nation's most influential religious figures. It was a bruising, sometimes ugly campaign in which many of the candidates were tainted by allegations of corruption, nepotism or racism, underscoring why the government-funded rabbinate has fallen so low in public opinion in recent years.
WORLD
January 11, 2005 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Mahmoud Abbas, president-elect of the Palestinian Authority, didn't wait for election officials to formally announce his victory. Instead, he was on the job first thing Monday morning -- perhaps because he knows he has his work cut out for him. Abbas, the 69-year-old successor to the late Yasser Arafat, received a daylong procession of dignitaries offering congratulations for his win in Sunday's landmark elections in the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem.
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Shlomo Lahat of Tel Aviv, a member of the rightist Likud Bloc, came out publicly the other day in favor of giving the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip to Jordan's King Hussein, a position shared by the most dovish wing of the rival Labor Alignment.
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres, in mourning over his slain predecessor, took up the reins of government Tuesday, restating his commitment to peace and pushing ahead with the expansion of Palestinian self-rule in the occupied West Bank. In meetings with world leaders and in public statements, Peres said he will not seek early elections. He said he is determined to press forward with the 1993 Israeli-Palestinian peace accord in the remaining year of the Labor-led government's term.
NEWS
May 30, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed like a clear-cut choice for the 15,000 Israeli residents of the strategic Golan Heights: Labor Party candidate Shimon Peres talked of returning the Golan to Syria in exchange for a permanent peace treaty, while Likud Party hopeful Benjamin Netanyahu labeled any return of the green and wind-swept highlands "impossible." But to hear residents tell it Wednesday, it was a false choice. For them, the handwriting is already on the wall.
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization are trading angry accusations about who is to blame for the delay in holding West Bank and Gaza Strip elections called for in their peace accord. Both sides agree on one thing: It is growing increasingly unlikely that Palestinian elections will be held before the end of this year.
WORLD
January 11, 2005 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Mahmoud Abbas, president-elect of the Palestinian Authority, didn't wait for election officials to formally announce his victory. Instead, he was on the job first thing Monday morning -- perhaps because he knows he has his work cut out for him. Abbas, the 69-year-old successor to the late Yasser Arafat, received a daylong procession of dignitaries offering congratulations for his win in Sunday's landmark elections in the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, looking haggard and grim, tossed his second bombshell in 12 days into the political arena Saturday night, announcing at a hastily called news conference that he will resign today and face a new election in 60 days.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Israel's political picture was brought a little more into focus Monday, at least for the moment, as two of the main candidates for prime minister firmed up their positions and came out swinging. Benjamin Netanyahu, the incumbent, easily won a primary within his Likud Party and formally emerged as its candidate for prime minister, television projections indicated. In so doing, the embattled leader, whose government fell Dec.
NEWS
May 30, 1996
HISTORY: Israel was founded in 1948 after the Holocaust as a haven for Jews on part of what was their biblical homeland. At the time, the area was British-ruled Palestine and inhabited largely by Arabs, many of whom opposed a Jewish state. The Palestinians hope to establish their own state in the West Bank and Gaza as a result of Arab-Israeli peacemaking. LAND DISPUTE: In the 1967 Middle East war, Israel captured the West Bank, the Gaza Strip and the Golan Heights.
NEWS
May 30, 1996 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Duki Dror had already cast his ballot, marking his choices on the yellow and blue forms at the Aharon Katzir High School polling place in this breezy seaside city. But he lingered Wednesday in the morning sunlight, agonizing about issues of peace and security, about the hope and fear that loomed, as always, over the Israeli elections. "Here in this place, in the Middle East, we cannot take a chance and not succeed in it," said Dror, a documentary filmmaker.
NEWS
May 30, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed like a clear-cut choice for the 15,000 Israeli residents of the strategic Golan Heights: Labor Party candidate Shimon Peres talked of returning the Golan to Syria in exchange for a permanent peace treaty, while Likud Party hopeful Benjamin Netanyahu labeled any return of the green and wind-swept highlands "impossible." But to hear residents tell it Wednesday, it was a false choice. For them, the handwriting is already on the wall.
NEWS
May 30, 1996 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Duki Dror had already cast his ballot, marking his choices on the yellow and blue forms at the Aharon Katzir High School polling place in this breezy seaside city. But he lingered Wednesday in the morning sunlight, agonizing about issues of peace and security, about the hope and fear that loomed, as always, over the Israeli elections. "Here in this place, in the Middle East, we cannot take a chance and not succeed in it," said Dror, a documentary filmmaker.
WORLD
February 11, 2009 | Ashraf Khalil
The weather at Razi Elementary School was depressing -- a driving winter rain mixed with occasional hail that soaked prospective voters as soon as they stepped out of their cars. Inside the school, local politicians fretted about the possibility of a record low turnout here in Israel's second-largest Arab city, and among Arab voters nationwide. On the streets, a protest against a right-wing Israeli politician serving as an election supervisor here briefly turned violent.
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres, in mourning over his slain predecessor, took up the reins of government Tuesday, restating his commitment to peace and pushing ahead with the expansion of Palestinian self-rule in the occupied West Bank. In meetings with world leaders and in public statements, Peres said he will not seek early elections. He said he is determined to press forward with the 1993 Israeli-Palestinian peace accord in the remaining year of the Labor-led government's term.
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization are trading angry accusations about who is to blame for the delay in holding West Bank and Gaza Strip elections called for in their peace accord. Both sides agree on one thing: It is growing increasingly unlikely that Palestinian elections will be held before the end of this year.
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