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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to make elections more competitive, the Los Angeles Ethics Commission on Monday moved to double matching funds for candidates and allow them to raise matchable funds earlier. The new rules could further level the playing field between well-financed incumbents and challengers by significantly increasing the amount of city money given to candidates. Challengers rely heavily on small contributions from individuals instead of large donations from corporations and political action committees.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2014 | By Jean Merl
State Sen. Roderick D. Wright told jurors Tuesday that he thought he was doing what the law required and did not intend to deceive voters when he switched his official address to run for office. Questioning became heated at times during his testimony, which stretched over three court sessions. The Inglewood Democrat, who has pleaded not guilty to eight felony counts of perjury and voter fraud, talked about what made him believe he was acting lawfully, while prosecutors tried to show he had schemed to run for an office he was not entitled to seek.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to make city elections more competitive, the Los Angeles Ethics Commission on Monday moved to double matching funds and lengthen the time during which contributions can be matched. The new rules could further level the playing field between well-financed incumbents and challengers by significantly increasing the amount of city money given to candidates who rely heavily on small contributions from individuals instead of large donations from corporations and political action committees.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - A ballot measure to overturn a Republican-backed state bill that made sweeping changes to Arizona election law was certified this week as having more than enough valid signatures, but on Friday opponents vowed to challenge those signatures in court. The effort to block the measure is the latest round in a growing fight in Arizona that revolves around voter participation and allegations of fraud. Democrats contend that the Republican-led Legislature passed the measure in June as part of a bigger movement to make it more difficult for minorities to vote and third-party candidates to run in the state.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former assemblyman, named a probate referee in Democrat Lt. Gov. Gray Davis' final days as state controller, resigned from his post last week after acknowledging that his appointment may have been in violation of state law. David A.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
A Buddhist temple involved in a controversial political fund-raiser four years ago featuring Vice President Al Gore has agreed to pay federal tax penalties as a result of an investigation by the Internal Revenue Service. The Hsi Lai Temple of Hacienda Heights confirmed the IRS examination Tuesday and said that the temple has agreed to pay an undisclosed "excise tax" on all political expenditures. It did not say when the IRS investigation began.
WORLD
December 7, 2009 | By Ned Parker and Raheem Salman
Iraqi lawmakers ended a governmental crisis Sunday by passing an election law just before a midnight deadline, after intense wrangling among the sides and, according to several participants, late phone calls from President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden. The law paves the way for national elections to be held most likely by the end of February, according to U.N. officials and Iraqi lawmakers. The vote is considered a test of Iraq's democratic ambitions as American combat troops here are scheduled to start their withdrawal this spring.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Barack Obama may have won this crucial state three years ago on the Sunday before election day when "souls to the polls" drives brought a surge of blacks and Latinos to cast ballots after church. Florida had opened the polls two weeks early, and even so, long lines across the state prompted the governor to issue an emergency order extending the hours for early voting. Propelled by waves of new voters including college students, Obama eked out a win with 51%. It will be different next year, a result of changes in the voting laws adopted by the Republican-controlled Legislature.
OPINION
March 31, 2011
The Supreme Court seems poised to overturn a modest effort by the state of Arizona to increase the candidate choices placed before voters and reduce the corruption associated with large special-interest campaign contributions. The conservative justices who were skeptical of the law and its rationale at Monday's oral arguments should think again. Upholding the law would not violate their convictions about campaign finance. The Arizona law provides a lump sum to candidates who agree to accept public financing and to abide by restrictions on fundraising and limits on how much they can give to their own campaigns.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2011 | By David G. Savage and Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Following a wave of corruption scandals, Arizona's voters in 1998 embarked on an ambitious experiment in campaign funding aimed at diminishing the influence of special interests. The voters passed the Citizens Clean Elections Act, which allowed candidates to fund campaigns with money from the state ? so long as they forswore contributions from private sources. The act created a level playing field for rich and not-so-rich candidates, but it also unleashed a flood of complaints that it was a waste of government money and unfair to savvy fundraisers.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A sharply divided Supreme Court has struck down a key part of the historic Voting Rights Act of 1965, freeing the Southern states from federal oversight of their election laws and setting off a fierce reaction from civil rights advocates and Democratic leaders. The court's conservative majority moved boldly Tuesday to rein in a law revered by civil rights groups that is credited with transforming the South by ensuring blacks could register and vote. In doing so, the court eliminated a tool that the Justice Department used hundreds of times to prevent cities, counties and states from adopting allegedly discriminatory voting rules.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Barack Obama may have won this crucial state three years ago on the Sunday before election day when "souls to the polls" drives brought a surge of blacks and Latinos to cast ballots after church. Florida had opened the polls two weeks early, and even so, long lines across the state prompted the governor to issue an emergency order extending the hours for early voting. Propelled by waves of new voters including college students, Obama eked out a win with 51%. It will be different next year, a result of changes in the voting laws adopted by the Republican-controlled Legislature.
OPINION
March 31, 2011
The Supreme Court seems poised to overturn a modest effort by the state of Arizona to increase the candidate choices placed before voters and reduce the corruption associated with large special-interest campaign contributions. The conservative justices who were skeptical of the law and its rationale at Monday's oral arguments should think again. Upholding the law would not violate their convictions about campaign finance. The Arizona law provides a lump sum to candidates who agree to accept public financing and to abide by restrictions on fundraising and limits on how much they can give to their own campaigns.
OPINION
March 28, 2011 | By Costas Panagopoulos
This week, the U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments in McComish vs. Bennett, a high-stakes case about public financing in American political campaigns. The court's ruling could affect public financing systems in numerous states and municipalities across the country, including programs in Los Angeles and several other California jurisdictions. At issue is a provision in Arizona's clean elections law that triggers matching funds for candidates participating in the public financing program when their privately financed opponents (or independent groups backing them)
NATIONAL
March 26, 2011 | By David G. Savage and Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Following a wave of corruption scandals, Arizona's voters in 1998 embarked on an ambitious experiment in campaign funding aimed at diminishing the influence of special interests. The voters passed the Citizens Clean Elections Act, which allowed candidates to fund campaigns with money from the state ? so long as they forswore contributions from private sources. The act created a level playing field for rich and not-so-rich candidates, but it also unleashed a flood of complaints that it was a waste of government money and unfair to savvy fundraisers.
NATIONAL
October 7, 2010 | By Kim Geiger, Tribune Washington Bureau
Democrats and their allies, moving to counter millions of dollars flowing to Republican campaigns from groups such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, have accused the international business organization of using foreign money to influence American elections. The effort to paint conservative political groups as fronts for multinational corporations and foreign billionaires gathered steam this week after an affiliate of the liberal-leaning Center for American Progress charged that the chamber was using funds from foreign corporations to finance its political operations in Washington.
NEWS
August 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Bosnia-Herzegovina's parliament adopted a long-delayed election law that is seen as a key condition for the Balkan country to join the 43-nation Council of Europe and hold a presidential election in 2002. The legislature's upper house gave the law its unanimous approval, two days after a majority in the lower house voted in favor of the legislation on how to run elections. The law will allow the country to organize its own elections.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2010 | By Clement Tan
Proposed legislation to block foreign companies from contributing money to U.S. elections could end up affecting well-known companies such as Chrysler, Anheuser-Busch and Citgo, according to legal experts and company representatives. The legislation is a reaction from key House and Senate Democrats to a Supreme Court decision in January that struck down a portion of the nation's campaign funding laws, allowing corporations to freely contribute to political campaigns. The high court's 5-4 decision in Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission seemed to open the way for U.S. subsidiaries of foreign corporations to also contribute to campaigns.
WORLD
December 7, 2009 | By Ned Parker and Raheem Salman
Iraqi lawmakers ended a governmental crisis Sunday by passing an election law just before a midnight deadline, after intense wrangling among the sides and, according to several participants, late phone calls from President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden. The law paves the way for national elections to be held most likely by the end of February, according to U.N. officials and Iraqi lawmakers. The vote is considered a test of Iraq's democratic ambitions as American combat troops here are scheduled to start their withdrawal this spring.
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