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Elections Poland

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NEWS
April 14, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was raining on market day in Jadow when Zdzislaw Okninski, the local Communist naczelnik , or village leader, walked through the mud in his good brown suit, the one with the broken zipper, looking for someone to talk to. He had gotten a late start for his market tour, his weekly morning of "meeting the people." The usual crowd had thinned out, and he had to troll the length of the market and start over before he hooked someone. "So how are the prices?" he ventured.
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WORLD
September 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
A pro-business party and an anti-corruption party were favored to oust Poland's ruling ex-Communists in a general election today that could determine how quickly the U.S. ally adopts the euro. When Poland joined the European Union last year, it agreed to eventually replace its currency, the zloty, with the EU common currency. To do that, its budget deficit must be less than 3% of gross domestic product.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1989
"I am old enough to have seen democratic elections. I want to see them again." With those plaintive but hopeful words, opposition leader Bronislaw Geremek has greeted the tentative understanding reached with Poland's Communist Party to create a new national two-house legislature, many of whose members would be freely elected.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was raining on market day in Jadow when Zdzislaw Okninski, the local Communist naczelnik , or village leader, walked through the mud in his good brown suit, the one with the broken zipper, looking for someone to talk to. He had gotten a late start for his market tour, his weekly morning of "meeting the people." The usual crowd had thinned out, and he had to troll the length of the market and start over before he hooked someone. "So how are the prices?" he ventured.
WORLD
September 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
A pro-business party and an anti-corruption party were favored to oust Poland's ruling ex-Communists in a general election today that could determine how quickly the U.S. ally adopts the euro. When Poland joined the European Union last year, it agreed to eventually replace its currency, the zloty, with the EU common currency. To do that, its budget deficit must be less than 3% of gross domestic product.
OPINION
May 10, 2005 | Jacob Heilbrunn, Jacob Heilbrunn is a Times editorial writer.
During his visit to the Baltics over the weekend, President Bush infuriated Russian leader Vladimir V. Putin by declaring the obvious: that the Soviet domination of Eastern Europe was "one of the greatest wrongs of history." But it was what he said next -- comparing the Yalta accord among Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Josef Stalin in 1945 to the Hitler-Stalin pact -- that should cause outrage here at home.
NEWS
April 5, 1989
Demands for more concessions from the Polish government threatened to unravel a sweeping reform package agreed to in marathon talks among official representatives and leaders of key Polish opposition, business and church groups. Shipyard workers and farmers joined official Communist trade unions in opposing the complex agreement, but Solidarity union founder Lech Walesa said he remains confident that opposition leaders will sign a pact with the government.
NEWS
April 24, 1989
Led by Lech Walesa, members of Poland's Solidarity trade union and allied opposition groups approved 252 independent candidates for national legislative elections Walesa, Solidarity's leader, declined to run. The 252 candidates, by receiving the endorsement of the Solidarity Citizens Committee, are now eligible to run for a new 100-member senate or for the 161 available opposition seats in the existing 460-member upper house known as the Sejm, or...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1995
George Weigel's column, "Time Proves Religious Basis for Tolerance" (Nov. 19), is a classic example of the blind leading the blind while living in the fantasy that Vatican II was a success. If established churches in Western Europe were dying, Vatican II finished them off. Since Vatican II, a great informal schism has taken place in Catholicism. Millions of Catholics worldwide have voted with their feet. Sunday Mass attendance in America has dropped from 71% to 24%; in France it's less than 10%; in Rome, the Pope's hometown, it's 8%. The Catholic hierarchy today is little more than a cadre of zealots drowning in political correctness while pushing a socialist political agenda under the cover of their fuzzy concept of Christian love.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | from Reuters
Solidarity leader Lech Walesa said Saturday that he is certain of winning Poland's presidency and doubts that Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki will stand against him. "I know I shall win," Walesa said in an interview with the Warsaw newspaper Zycie Warszawy. "I think he (Mazowiecki) won't be a candidate. If he is, we will fight for victory. We shall hold a Western-style campaign."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1989
"I am old enough to have seen democratic elections. I want to see them again." With those plaintive but hopeful words, opposition leader Bronislaw Geremek has greeted the tentative understanding reached with Poland's Communist Party to create a new national two-house legislature, many of whose members would be freely elected.
NEWS
June 13, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Poland's Council of State announced Monday that a new list of candidates will be submitted in a special slate to replace 33 government and Communist Party officials who were rejected by voters in parliamentary elections June 4. Among the 33 defeated candidates on the government's "national list" was Premier Mieczyslaw F. Rakowski and seven other members of the party's ruling Politburo. Rakowski, in a statement issued after the decree by the Council of State, did not rule out continuing as head of the government but said that to ensure that "the will of the electorate would not be offended," he will not seek election.
NEWS
March 10, 1989 | JACKSON DIEHL, The Washington Post
Polish Communist Party and opposition negotiators announced agreement Thursday on a major reorganization of the nation's political system that would provide for democratic elections to a new legislative chamber in June as well as a powerful new presidency.
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