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NEWS
February 1, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov insisted that he has no interest in running for president in 2000, just days after running afoul of President Boris N. Yeltsin by proposing limits on his powers. "It's laughable to think that I want to strengthen my position to participate in the presidential race," Primakov said. He has taken over most responsibility for the government's work in recent months while the ailing Yeltsin remains in the background.
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OPINION
December 9, 2003
Don't believe President Vladimir V. Putin's claim that Russia's parliamentary elections brought democracy closer. The balloting Sunday represented a lamentable step back toward authoritarian rule. Putin's allies in the State Duma, led by the United Russia party, appear set to gain a two-thirds majority. Putin will almost certainly win election to a second four-year term in March, given the absence of meaningful opposition.
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NEWS
July 12, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters in Ukraine and Belarus, whose leaders conspired to break up the Soviet Union 2 1/2 years ago, have elected presidents favoring closer ties with Russia, official returns showed Monday. The turnabout is expected to give Moscow greater sway over its old empire.
NEWS
March 14, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to satisfy public hunger for speedy victory in Chechnya, acting Russian President Vladimir V. Putin on Monday announced a more modest triumph: the capture of one of the most notorious Chechen rebel fighters, Salman Raduyev. Raduyev was taken by surprise in the Chechen village of Novogroznensky on Sunday by the FSB, the main successor agency to the KGB, and flown to Moscow, where he was placed in an isolation cell in the high-security Lefortovo Prison.
OPINION
December 9, 2003
Don't believe President Vladimir V. Putin's claim that Russia's parliamentary elections brought democracy closer. The balloting Sunday represented a lamentable step back toward authoritarian rule. Putin's allies in the State Duma, led by the United Russia party, appear set to gain a two-thirds majority. Putin will almost certainly win election to a second four-year term in March, given the absence of meaningful opposition.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Close advisers to President Boris N. Yeltsin are publicly urging that elections mandated by Russia's new constitution be postponed and that Yeltsin stay in office at least two years longer than his elected term. Holding presidential elections as scheduled in 1996 would be "untimely and destabilizing," the advisers warn. To bolster their case, they flash the threat that holding elections in the midst of painful economic reforms could bring to power neo-fascist lawmaker Vladimir V.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The red hammer-and-sickle emblem on Yuri Khudyakov's white miner helmet gives a good idea of his attitude toward democracy. He says it's time to trash the whole experiment and get Russia back to Soviet-style rule. But on Sunday he will serve as a foot soldier in a purely democratic exercise--poll watching. He's one of 175,000 activists being deployed by the Communist Party across the country to monitor the presidential election.
NEWS
May 30, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bolstered by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's opposition, Communist radical Boris N. Yeltsin finally got what he wanted Tuesday, the presidency of Russia, by promising the republic's Congress he would consult with all political points of view before forming a government. Outside the Kremlin's brick walls, Yeltsin backers cheered and wept with joy at news of the silver-haired maverick's victory which reportedly came despite a final appeal from Gorbachev.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
Radical reformer Boris N. Yeltsin overcame opposition from Mikhail S. Gorbachev to win the presidency of the largest Soviet republic today in what he called "Russia's social, economic and spiritual rebirth." After three hard-fought ballots in the 1,060-member Russian Congress of People's Deputies, Yeltsin won 535 votes--four more than the majority he needed. Russian Premier Alexander Vlasov received 467 votes.
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flaunting the perquisites of incumbency, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin shut down major thoroughfares, deployed tens of thousands of security troops and struck up the bands Wednesday for half a million revelers in a holiday hurrah wrapping up his reelection campaign in the capital. Picture-perfect weather and the stunning backdrop of the Kremlin towers and St.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov insisted that he has no interest in running for president in 2000, just days after running afoul of President Boris N. Yeltsin by proposing limits on his powers. "It's laughable to think that I want to strengthen my position to participate in the presidential race," Primakov said. He has taken over most responsibility for the government's work in recent months while the ailing Yeltsin remains in the background.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The red hammer-and-sickle emblem on Yuri Khudyakov's white miner helmet gives a good idea of his attitude toward democracy. He says it's time to trash the whole experiment and get Russia back to Soviet-style rule. But on Sunday he will serve as a foot soldier in a purely democratic exercise--poll watching. He's one of 175,000 activists being deployed by the Communist Party across the country to monitor the presidential election.
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flaunting the perquisites of incumbency, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin shut down major thoroughfares, deployed tens of thousands of security troops and struck up the bands Wednesday for half a million revelers in a holiday hurrah wrapping up his reelection campaign in the capital. Picture-perfect weather and the stunning backdrop of the Kremlin towers and St.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Close advisers to President Boris N. Yeltsin are publicly urging that elections mandated by Russia's new constitution be postponed and that Yeltsin stay in office at least two years longer than his elected term. Holding presidential elections as scheduled in 1996 would be "untimely and destabilizing," the advisers warn. To bolster their case, they flash the threat that holding elections in the midst of painful economic reforms could bring to power neo-fascist lawmaker Vladimir V.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters in Ukraine and Belarus, whose leaders conspired to break up the Soviet Union 2 1/2 years ago, have elected presidents favoring closer ties with Russia, official returns showed Monday. The turnabout is expected to give Moscow greater sway over its old empire.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several hundred top supporters of President Boris N. Yeltsin, united under the slogan "Freedom, Property and Legality," assembled Saturday to found what could become Russia's dominant party and to launch their campaign for crucial Dec. 12 elections. Official delegates and just about everybody who's anybody in the pro-Yeltsin camp came together in a new bloc known as Russia's Choice, which aims to get as many reformist candidates as it can elected to Russia's new Parliament.
NEWS
March 14, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to satisfy public hunger for speedy victory in Chechnya, acting Russian President Vladimir V. Putin on Monday announced a more modest triumph: the capture of one of the most notorious Chechen rebel fighters, Salman Raduyev. Raduyev was taken by surprise in the Chechen village of Novogroznensky on Sunday by the FSB, the main successor agency to the KGB, and flown to Moscow, where he was placed in an isolation cell in the high-security Lefortovo Prison.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several hundred top supporters of President Boris N. Yeltsin, united under the slogan "Freedom, Property and Legality," assembled Saturday to found what could become Russia's dominant party and to launch their campaign for crucial Dec. 12 elections. Official delegates and just about everybody who's anybody in the pro-Yeltsin camp came together in a new bloc known as Russia's Choice, which aims to get as many reformist candidates as it can elected to Russia's new Parliament.
NEWS
May 30, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bolstered by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's opposition, Communist radical Boris N. Yeltsin finally got what he wanted Tuesday, the presidency of Russia, by promising the republic's Congress he would consult with all political points of view before forming a government. Outside the Kremlin's brick walls, Yeltsin backers cheered and wept with joy at news of the silver-haired maverick's victory which reportedly came despite a final appeal from Gorbachev.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
Radical reformer Boris N. Yeltsin overcame opposition from Mikhail S. Gorbachev to win the presidency of the largest Soviet republic today in what he called "Russia's social, economic and spiritual rebirth." After three hard-fought ballots in the 1,060-member Russian Congress of People's Deputies, Yeltsin won 535 votes--four more than the majority he needed. Russian Premier Alexander Vlasov received 467 votes.
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