Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsElectoral Complaints Commission
IN THE NEWS

Electoral Complaints Commission

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
October 13, 2009 | Laura King
The disarray surrounding Afghanistan's presidential election deepened today when an Afghan member of the vote-reviewing commission quit, citing "foreign interference." The resignation of Mustafa Barakzai from the Electoral Complaints Commission was not expected to affect the panel's work of sifting through allegations of massive vote-rigging in the Aug. 20 balloting, officials said. But it added an acrimonious new element to a vote that has already become an exercise in recrimination -- and has left Afghanistan in political limbo at a time when crucial decisions about the course of the conflict are being made in Washington.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 28, 2013 | By Max Boot
Hamid Karzai has been president of Afghanistan for a long time - since the end of 2001, when he was installed by a U.S.-led alliance. At the time, he seemed a charming, English-speaking leader with a colorful wardrobe who could craft a democratic, post-Taliban state. Today Karzai is perceived, at least in the West, as erratic and unpredictable, an opportunist who has troubling ties to corrupt officials and abusive warlords. Far from consolidating democracy, Karzai has presided over the development of a deeply corrupt and abusive state that has allowed the resurgence of the Taliban.
Advertisement
WORLD
September 2, 2009 | Laura King
In a low-slung building tucked behind concrete blast barriers on the edge of the Afghan capital, the plain brown envelopes are opened one by one, and the complaint forms inside smoothed out and scrutinized by weary-eyed workers. One handwritten account tells of a gunman turning up at a polling place. Another describes a candidate brazenly handing out cash bribes. Yet another reports a ballot box filled with votes only moments after the start of polling. Nearly two weeks after Afghanistan's troubled presidential election, the task of sorting out allegations of fraud and intimidation has swelled.
WORLD
October 19, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Electoral officials sifting through thousands of complaints of vote fraud in last month's parliamentary elections said Monday that ballots from about one-tenth of Afghanistan's voting centers had been tossed out, with more disqualifications likely. The release of preliminary results, now due Wednesday, has been delayed twice as authorities scrutinize a welter of allegations including ballot box stuffing and vote buying, as well as armed intimidation of voters. It is not yet clear whether the scale of fraud in September's parliamentary vote will be found to be as serious as that in last year's presidential election, when about one-third of the ballots cast for President Hamid Karzai were thrown out. Karzai ultimately prevailed after his main rival dropped out of a runoff vote, but the tainted election set the tone for a tempestuous second term, marked by widening public discontent with his administration and quarrels with his Western backers.
WORLD
August 30, 2009 | Associated Press
President Hamid Karzai widened his lead over his main challenger in election returns released Saturday, creeping toward the 50% mark that would enable him to avoid a runoff in the divisive presidential contest. Karzai's top challenger, Abdullah Abdullah, stepped up his fraud charges, raising doubts as to whether the former foreign minister's followers would accept the incumbent if he wins in the first round. Accusations of fraud in the Aug. 20 vote have poured in to the Electoral Complaints Commission, which must investigate the allegations before final results can be announced.
OPINION
May 10, 2010 | By Peter W. Galbraith
Will we ever learn? In 2009, Afghan President Hamid Karzai, who will meet with President Obama in Washington this week, ripped off American taxpayers for about $200 million. This is what the United States contributed to support presidential elections that Karzai himself admits were massively fraudulent. Now, the United Nations and the Obama administration propose to fund Afghanistan's parliamentary elections in September, even though new rules pushed through by Karzai — over the opposition of parliament — make fraud even more likely this time.
OPINION
October 6, 2009
As President Obama weighs the military's request for up to 40,000 more U.S. troops in Afghanistan, election officials in the capital city of Kabul are combing through a sampling of more than 350 suspect ballot boxes for signs of fraud significant enough to have given President Hamid Karzai the majority he needed to win reelection without a runoff. The two issues cannot and should not be separated. No matter how many additional troops the United States and NATO send to Afghanistan, or which strategy Obama decides to employ against the Taliban and its Al Qaeda allies, it cannot succeed without an Afghan government that is seen as legitimate by the people.
WORLD
March 14, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
Afghan President Hamid Karzai agreed Saturday to allow foreign observers to sit on an election commission, reversing a decree that sidestepped international oversight and drew U.S. criticism that he was jeopardizing his government's credibility. Karzai's decision followed weeks of pressure from the international community to improve the legitimacy of elections. The president's reelection in August was widely regarded as fraudulent, and his recent decision to do away with foreign monitors further agitated the United Nations.
WORLD
October 19, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Electoral officials sifting through thousands of complaints of vote fraud in last month's parliamentary elections said Monday that ballots from about one-tenth of Afghanistan's voting centers had been tossed out, with more disqualifications likely. The release of preliminary results, now due Wednesday, has been delayed twice as authorities scrutinize a welter of allegations including ballot box stuffing and vote buying, as well as armed intimidation of voters. It is not yet clear whether the scale of fraud in September's parliamentary vote will be found to be as serious as that in last year's presidential election, when about one-third of the ballots cast for President Hamid Karzai were thrown out. Karzai ultimately prevailed after his main rival dropped out of a runoff vote, but the tainted election set the tone for a tempestuous second term, marked by widening public discontent with his administration and quarrels with his Western backers.
WORLD
October 11, 2010 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
More than 4,000 complaints have been received about Afghanistan's recent parliamentary elections, and a majority of them have the potential to change the results, the country's election watchdog said Sunday. The Sept. 18 elections were held despite Taliban threats. But Western expectations for free and fair elections have remained relatively low since last year's presidential vote, which saw Hamid Karzai returned to power amid widespread fraud. In that contest, the United Nations-backed Electoral Complaints Commission threw out more than a third of Karzai's votes, marring his reputation at home and abroad.
WORLD
October 11, 2010 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
More than 4,000 complaints have been received about Afghanistan's recent parliamentary elections, and a majority of them have the potential to change the results, the country's election watchdog said Sunday. The Sept. 18 elections were held despite Taliban threats. But Western expectations for free and fair elections have remained relatively low since last year's presidential vote, which saw Hamid Karzai returned to power amid widespread fraud. In that contest, the United Nations-backed Electoral Complaints Commission threw out more than a third of Karzai's votes, marring his reputation at home and abroad.
OPINION
May 10, 2010 | By Peter W. Galbraith
Will we ever learn? In 2009, Afghan President Hamid Karzai, who will meet with President Obama in Washington this week, ripped off American taxpayers for about $200 million. This is what the United States contributed to support presidential elections that Karzai himself admits were massively fraudulent. Now, the United Nations and the Obama administration propose to fund Afghanistan's parliamentary elections in September, even though new rules pushed through by Karzai — over the opposition of parliament — make fraud even more likely this time.
WORLD
March 14, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
Afghan President Hamid Karzai agreed Saturday to allow foreign observers to sit on an election commission, reversing a decree that sidestepped international oversight and drew U.S. criticism that he was jeopardizing his government's credibility. Karzai's decision followed weeks of pressure from the international community to improve the legitimacy of elections. The president's reelection in August was widely regarded as fraudulent, and his recent decision to do away with foreign monitors further agitated the United Nations.
WORLD
March 5, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
The departing U.N. envoy to Afghanistan said Thursday that the nation's leaders must "clean up their own house" and warned that U.S.-led military operations must not jeopardize political efforts toward reconciliation with the Taliban. At a news conference marking the end of his 18-month term, Kai Eide said there was hope for the nation but the world needed more resolve from President Hamid Karzai's government. He criticized Afghanistan for a lack of reform and the international community for "fast-ticking clocks" and unrealistic demands.
WORLD
October 13, 2009 | Laura King
The disarray surrounding Afghanistan's presidential election deepened today when an Afghan member of the vote-reviewing commission quit, citing "foreign interference." The resignation of Mustafa Barakzai from the Electoral Complaints Commission was not expected to affect the panel's work of sifting through allegations of massive vote-rigging in the Aug. 20 balloting, officials said. But it added an acrimonious new element to a vote that has already become an exercise in recrimination -- and has left Afghanistan in political limbo at a time when crucial decisions about the course of the conflict are being made in Washington.
OPINION
October 6, 2009
As President Obama weighs the military's request for up to 40,000 more U.S. troops in Afghanistan, election officials in the capital city of Kabul are combing through a sampling of more than 350 suspect ballot boxes for signs of fraud significant enough to have given President Hamid Karzai the majority he needed to win reelection without a runoff. The two issues cannot and should not be separated. No matter how many additional troops the United States and NATO send to Afghanistan, or which strategy Obama decides to employ against the Taliban and its Al Qaeda allies, it cannot succeed without an Afghan government that is seen as legitimate by the people.
WORLD
September 7, 2009 | M. Karim Faiez and Laura King
Reporting from Kabul, Afghanistan, and Istanbul, Turkey -- Afghan election officials today announced their first mass disqualification of votes because of possible fraud in the bitterly contested presidential race, even as President Hamid Karzai edged closer to the absolute majority he needs for a first-round victory. Election authorities declined to say how many votes were affected when results from nearly 450 polling places were set aside pending an investigation. Because voting took place in about 26,000 locales, this probably represents only a small share of total ballots cast.
WORLD
March 5, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
The departing U.N. envoy to Afghanistan said Thursday that the nation's leaders must "clean up their own house" and warned that U.S.-led military operations must not jeopardize political efforts toward reconciliation with the Taliban. At a news conference marking the end of his 18-month term, Kai Eide said there was hope for the nation but the world needed more resolve from President Hamid Karzai's government. He criticized Afghanistan for a lack of reform and the international community for "fast-ticking clocks" and unrealistic demands.
WORLD
September 7, 2009 | M. Karim Faiez and Laura King
Reporting from Kabul, Afghanistan, and Istanbul, Turkey -- Afghan election officials today announced their first mass disqualification of votes because of possible fraud in the bitterly contested presidential race, even as President Hamid Karzai edged closer to the absolute majority he needs for a first-round victory. Election authorities declined to say how many votes were affected when results from nearly 450 polling places were set aside pending an investigation. Because voting took place in about 26,000 locales, this probably represents only a small share of total ballots cast.
WORLD
September 2, 2009 | Laura King
In a low-slung building tucked behind concrete blast barriers on the edge of the Afghan capital, the plain brown envelopes are opened one by one, and the complaint forms inside smoothed out and scrutinized by weary-eyed workers. One handwritten account tells of a gunman turning up at a polling place. Another describes a candidate brazenly handing out cash bribes. Yet another reports a ballot box filled with votes only moments after the start of polling. Nearly two weeks after Afghanistan's troubled presidential election, the task of sorting out allegations of fraud and intimidation has swelled.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|