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NEWS
October 1, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High-level U.S. and Japanese negotiators met into the night Friday, hoping to find enough common ground to avoid a rupture in trade relations that could further weaken the dollar and send crucial economic relations between the two countries into a tailspin. Japanese Trade Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto ended talks with U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor at midnight, saying the two men planned to meet again.
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OPINION
February 5, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
House GOP leaders issued a set of standards last week for overhauling U.S. immigration law, but the ink had hardly dried on their one-page summary before conservatives starting pushing back - not against the leadership's ideas but against the idea of doing anything at all on such a controversial issue. Nevertheless, the House should press ahead. Resolving the many problems in the current system will only get harder if it misses the opportunity it has now. The leadership's standards represent an important shift in two areas.
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OPINION
December 2, 2005 | Ted B. Kissell
SEVERAL LATIN AMERICAN newspapers published editorials about World AIDS Day on Thursday (as did The Times). La Republica in Lima, Peru, noted that 14,000 Peruvians have died of AIDS since its first reported case in 1983. The paper called for "massive campaigns of prevention," adding that these campaigns must "reiterate -- despite opposition from confessional sectors -- that the only effective measure against AIDS is a condom."
OPINION
February 16, 2011 | Tim Rutten
Winston Churchill famously described fanatics as those who "can't change their mind and won't change the subject. " It's an appraisal that also could be applied to those deranged Americans who continue to insist that President Obama is neither a U.S. citizen nor a Christian. The so-called birther fantasy tends to go hand in hand with the belief that the president is secretly a Muslim militant scheming to impose Sharia law on the United States. American politics are no more immune to the corrosive effects of irrational and conspiratorial thinking than those of any other nation, which is why Republican leaders are courting the perilous and the unpredictable when they wink at this latest iteration of the paranoid style.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1999
Re your interview with Ron Unz (Opinion, May 30): If we really want reform of big-money electoral politics, then we only need one initiative--an initiative to eliminate initiatives. Big-money interest groups buy the results with false advertising, slate mailers and disinformation campaigns. Let's dump the entire initiative system and hold our legislators to their duly elected task of writing the laws we are expected to live by. While we are at it, let's spend some of the savings feeding the hungry or educating our children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1991 | Edited California Senate speech of Sen. Lucy Killea, explaining her decision to quit the Democratic Party:
This institution--the Senate, the Assembly, the Legislature as a whole--is in serious trouble. We have lost the public's confidence, and it has been a failure of both political parties to provide the leadership to regain it. So, after more than 40 years as a registered Democrat, I have decided to leave the Democratic Party and re-register as an independent.
NEWS
November 14, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, a man on a permanent quest for political approval, found it--perhaps even more than he really needed--on this distant East Asian shore. A one-day stop in the Philippines won Clinton an endorsement from Philippine President Fidel V. Ramos so enthusiastic that it might have raised a blush on the cheek of a political consultant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1994
All this blaming of President Clinton and activist government for Tuesday's elections is hogwash. The American public has never rejected a party for accomplishing too much. While we liberals lick our wounds, we must remember that Clinton's legislative failures were in a Democrat-controlled Congress. Maybe now that their noses have been bloodied, the idiotic Dems who fought him on health, crime, welfare reform, etc., will learn to stand behind and support their wonderful President through the New(t)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989
The recent election of the Soviet Congress of Deputies has generated some of the most starry-eyed Western political commentary since the portrayal of Yuri Andropov as a jazz-loving closet liberal. Although the election does represent a departure from the previous status quo, we should not allow it to distract us from the important continuities in the Soviet political situation. The election did not alter the fundamental fact that Soviet political events reflect primarily the interests and desires of the ruling elite.
OPINION
April 19, 1998 | TERRY B. FRIEDMAN, Superior Court Judge Terry B. Friedman is chairman of the California Judges Assn. Judicial Elections Committee. He was a state assemblyman from 1986 to 1994
It's an election year, so voters should prepare themselves for partisanship, promises and petty campaigning. While perhaps not appealing, this is how elections have been conducted throughout American history and our nation has survived and thrived. Raw electoral politics is an acceptable price to pay for living in a democracy. Yet this virus increasingly infects the branch of our government intended to be nonpolitical: the judiciary.
OPINION
December 2, 2005 | Ted B. Kissell
SEVERAL LATIN AMERICAN newspapers published editorials about World AIDS Day on Thursday (as did The Times). La Republica in Lima, Peru, noted that 14,000 Peruvians have died of AIDS since its first reported case in 1983. The paper called for "massive campaigns of prevention," adding that these campaigns must "reiterate -- despite opposition from confessional sectors -- that the only effective measure against AIDS is a condom."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2004 | Baz Dreisinger, Special to The Times
Weeks before finally opening here, the national convention, its red, white, and blue posters blanketing Manhattan, had heads talking. Whose speech would mean "bounce" for the party? What would the candidate say to supporters? Answers came Thursday night, as delegates filed into Manhattan's Roseland Ballroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2004 | TIM RUTTEN
Imagine for one moment a country so suffused with religious sentiment that its bestselling novel and most widely seen film are constructed from popular pieties, a place where even politicians have to reckon constantly with the sensitivities of entrenched and influential theological traditionalists. Would we be discussing the Taliban-ridden Afghan hill country? Perhaps the Wahabi hinterlands of Saudi Arabia's implacable Koran Belt? Iran under the mullahs or the Vatican City?
OPINION
February 17, 2004 | Rajan Menon, Rajan Menon is a professor of international relations at Lehigh University.
In just a month, Russian voters will elect their next president in what would appear to be a welcome sign of the consolidation of Russian democracy. But beneath the surface of electoral politics -- not very far beneath -- there are disturbing signs that the foundation of Russian democracy is beginning to buckle. One measure of democracy's health is the fate of dissenters. Russia does not fare well in this respect.
OPINION
September 29, 2002 | NEAL GABLER, Neal Gabler, a senior fellow at the Norman Lear Center at USC Annenberg, is the author of "Life the Movie: How Entertainment Conquered Reality."
As the country braces for war with Iraq, there seems to be none of the anxiety usually associated with impending conflict. Americans seem not only sanguine; they appear confident and even eager to fight. Polls show that a majority of Americans favor going after Saddam Hussein alone, and that majority becomes overwhelming if the United Nations is our umbrella.
OPINION
March 31, 2002 | WILLIAM SCHNEIDER, William Schneider, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a political analyst for CNN.
Politically speaking, it's still Nov. 7, 2000. The two parties remain deadlocked. The red state/blue state division of America persists, with the red (Bush) states like Texas getting redder and the blue (Gore) states like California getting bluer. That's because the division enshrined in the 2000 election map wasn't a division over policy. It was a division over values: liberal America and conservative America. Nothing has happened in the last year and a half to heal that division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2001 | JOHN BALZAR
News Item: If Congress outlaws "soft money" campaign contributions and tries to silence special interests before the next federal elections, the National Rifle Assn. vows to launch a vessel and steam into international waters. From there, "The Good Ship NRA" will beam radio messages back to land, warning Americans about which politicians are out to strip them of their constitutional entitlement to keep guns.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an unmistakable, if slightly unsettling, exhibition of the torrid velocity of political development in the Eastern Bloc, a Czechoslovakian campaign manager greeted Hollywood this week--right there in Jane Fonda's living room, at that most refined of California political functions: The chic fund-raiser.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2001 | JOHN BALZAR
News Item: If Congress outlaws "soft money" campaign contributions and tries to silence special interests before the next federal elections, the National Rifle Assn. vows to launch a vessel and steam into international waters. From there, "The Good Ship NRA" will beam radio messages back to land, warning Americans about which politicians are out to strip them of their constitutional entitlement to keep guns.
NEWS
December 7, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the two major parties near the end of their vicious war for the White House, Democratic activists and would-be political reformers are quietly pressing Republican electors to do the unthinkable: Vote for Democrat Al Gore. Less a movement than a series of individual and overlapping acts, the agitators seek to split away two or three votes from among George W. Bush's anticipated 271 Republican electors when the all-important electoral college convenes Dec. 18.
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