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BUSINESS
August 3, 1991 | HAL FOSTER
A Los Angeles company that makes equipment for dams and other electrical power-generating facilities has entered into a joint venture with two Soviet companies to market large Soviet-built generators and turbines in the United States. Magnetek Inc. is the No. 1 builder of medium-power transformers in the United States, but does not manufacture the industry's biggest power devices--generators and turbines.
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OPINION
March 14, 2013 | By William deBuys
If cities were stocks, you'd want to short Phoenix. Of course, it's an easy city to pick on. The nation's 13th-largest metropolitan area crams 4.3 million people into a low bowl in a hot desert, where horrific heat waves and windstorms visit it regularly. And it depends on an improbable infrastructure to suck water from the distant (and dwindling) Colorado River. If the Gulf Coast's Hurricane Katrina and the Eastern Seaboard's Superstorm Sandy previewed how coastal cities can expect to fare as seas rise and storms strengthen, Phoenix - which also stands squarely in the cross hairs of climate change - pulls back the curtain on the future of inland empires.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 1994 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This time, don't blame California's business climate. Los Angeles-based MagneTek, a fast-growing maker and distributor of electrical equipment, said Tuesday that it is moving its corporate headquarters to Nashville, Tenn. But MagneTek officials took pains to point out that they really do like California--so much so that Andrew G. Galef, MagneTek chairman and chief executive, plans to stay in Los Angeles and run the firm long-distance with frequent visits to Tennessee.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2012 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - A nor'easter that threatens to lash the mid-Atlantic states with freezing rain, snow and high winds appeared to be weakening in the Atlantic Ocean, but still could cause new flooding and power outages and hamper recovery efforts in areas that suffered the brunt of Superstorm Sandy last week. The new storm is far smaller than Sandy, but officials fear low-lying areas in New Jersey and southern New York are vulnerable because Sandy destroyed so many sand dunes and other natural barriers, as well as man-made sea walls and jetties, that normally limit damage from high storm surges.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Stepping back from the edge of a potential trade war, the United States and Europe agreed Wednesday to break down barriers to government purchases of American-made turbines, generators and other heavy electric equipment. But the Clinton Administration and the European Community failed to reach agreement after two days of negotiations and transatlantic telephone calls on measures to remove obstacles to European government purchases of U.S.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1994 | JACK SEARLES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rachel Benavides, the travel coordinator at Power-One Inc., knew the power supply company's new bonus plan was catching on last year when salesmen started asking her to buy them super-discount airline tickets for business trips. "They wanted the deals where you have to stay over on Saturday night," she recalls. "That's how you get the cheapest seats and hotel rooms."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1990 | LAURA MICHAELIS
They are barely visible over the roof of the school. But as one walks around to the rear of Rancho Santiago College, there they stand--about 30 telephone poles in a circular pattern on a small patch of land. On Saturday, as every weekend, this suburban Stonehenge is the official training ground for union electrical apprentices--the men and women who erect and maintain power lines.
OPINION
March 14, 2013 | By William deBuys
If cities were stocks, you'd want to short Phoenix. Of course, it's an easy city to pick on. The nation's 13th-largest metropolitan area crams 4.3 million people into a low bowl in a hot desert, where horrific heat waves and windstorms visit it regularly. And it depends on an improbable infrastructure to suck water from the distant (and dwindling) Colorado River. If the Gulf Coast's Hurricane Katrina and the Eastern Seaboard's Superstorm Sandy previewed how coastal cities can expect to fare as seas rise and storms strengthen, Phoenix - which also stands squarely in the cross hairs of climate change - pulls back the curtain on the future of inland empires.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1988
Donald L. Randle, 55, has been named sales vice president--Pacific Southwest for Square D Co., an electrical equipment and electronic products maker.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2012 | By Joseph Serna
Bruised but not beaten, New Jersey and New York are bracing for Round 2 with Mother Nature. In any other year, the nor'easter forecast to hit the Atlantic coast Wednesday and Thursday would be considered routine, National Weather Service officials said. But for a region still wobbled from Hurricane Sandy's impact last week, even a moderate storm can bring serious consequences. “No doubt, if Sandy had not made landfall, if Sandy had not happened, this would be a nor'easter but it would be a non-event compared to what we're left with now,” said Bruce Terry, lead forecaster for the National Weather Service.
HEALTH
July 7, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
With the cycles, the flat-screen TVs and, of course, the air conditioning, most people who exercise at gyms are working out the electrical grid along with their muscles. But the members of AC4 Fitness in Goleta will be generating power and feeding it back to the grid every time they step on a treadmill or elliptical. When they need a drink, they'll have to bring their own refillable bottle and get water from a hydration station that provides free water filtered with reverse osmosis. And when they stash their belongings, they'll do so in lockers made from recycled plastic.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2006 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Airbus' double-decker A380 is a giant spaghetti bowl of electrical wires. If the 100,000 individual sections of wire strung through the world's largest passenger jet were laid end to end, they would stretch 330 miles, the distance from Los Angeles to San Jose. The wires control virtually every function on the jetliner, including the pilot's basic task of turning the 500-ton aircraft and enabling all 555 passengers to customize what they see on personal video screens.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2005 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Whirling flywheels, based on the same mechanism that powered pottery wheels in ancient times and run the latest self-winding wristwatches, soon could be enlisted in California's battle to keep its air conditioners humming on even the hottest summer afternoons. On Tuesday, state energy officials gathered at a Pacific Gas & Electric Co.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boeing Co. said Thursday that "suspicious" damage was found to electrical wires of as many as 10 jetliners undergoing final assembly at a Seattle-area plant and that the FBI has launched an investigation into possible tampering. The damaged wires on the 737s were repaired and no other cases have been found. But the company said it is conducting an internal probe to determine what or who inflicted the damage to the world's most popular commercial airplane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chained to the electric oxygen machine that keeps her alive, Patricia Roy was breathing easier Thursday at news that California may be edging toward solving the electricity crisis. The Santa Monica emphysema patient was among thousands jarred last week when Southern California Edison Co. warned that it could not guarantee uninterrupted power--although her doctor said she will die if her air supply is cut off for more than an hour or so.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2000
Thousands of Huntington Beach residents lost electric power Sunday evening after electrical equipment failed. The failure meant 6,500 customers lost power for about two hours. By 8:45 p.m., electricity was restored to all but 380 homes in an area around Brookhurst Street and Hamilton and Adams avenues, said Ray Golden, a spokesman for Southern California Edison. The outage was unrelated to recent statewide electrical shortages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2000 | GINA PICCALO and TWILA DECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A series of rain-related explosions in an underground electrical substation rocked downtown Santa Monica before dawn Thursday and sent flames shooting from a manhole, slightly injuring two men and knocking out power for several hours to about 16,000 customers. About 2,000 customers within a two-block radius of the substation at Lincoln Boulevard and Colorado Avenue were expected to be without electricity until this afternoon, Southern California Edison Co. officials said.
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