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BUSINESS
November 22, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
As the state's largest utilities contemplate crippling losses and severe rate hikes for consumers and Gov. Gray Davis worries about the effect of an energy crisis on his political future, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power calmly plans for rate reductions and energy reliability over the next 10 years. DWP, the energy ugly duckling turned swan, even offers a vision of how California can solve some of its power shortage problems without massive expenditure and environmental disruption.
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BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel and Marc Lifsher
NEW YORK - California utility customers could one day split more than $100 million if federal regulators settle with JPMorgan Chase & Co. over allegations that the nation's biggest bank manipulated the state's energy market. JPMorgan has been negotiating a settlement with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission over its role in trading electricity in California, according to a source familiar with the matter. It was unclear how much of a settlement would wind up going to the U.S. Treasury and how much might be returned to California ratepayers.
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NEWS
January 31, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An antiquated and overworked system of electric transmission lines could leave much of California starved for power even if the state can eventually generate and import enough electricity to serve its 34 million residents. The 26,000-mile-long system--enough wire to circle Earth--has long been neglected, a victim of poor planning, unexpected growth in electricity consumption and regulations that make the lines a poor investment from the standpoint of the big utilities.
NEWS
December 5, 2001 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As California gets set to launch its unprecedented Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate, two key East Coast states that once marched with it in a united effort to push development of electric-powered and other nonpolluting vehicles are falling behind. The result could be a delay of several years in the launch of zero-emission vehicles in New York and Massachusetts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1995 | MICHAEL R. PEEVEY and MICHAEL C. BURKE, Michael R. Peevey is president and Michael C. Burke is vice president of New Energy Ventures Inc. , Pasadena
Californians pay far too much for electricity. The $18 billion spent on electricity each year by governments, businesses, farmers and residents is due to rates which are among the highest in the nation. But if California creates a truly competitive electricity market--one whose first principle is choice for the customer, not the producer--the price of electricity could drop as much as 50%.
NEWS
July 28, 2001 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and DARYL KELLEY and RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Davis administration, stung by charges of excessive secrecy, disclosed late Friday that it has fired five energy consultants because of conflicts of interest involving their official duties and personal finances. A sixth consultant hired to help California purchase electricity has quit, according to state records. All were involved in purchasing electricity for the state from a generator whose stock they owned.
NEWS
December 5, 2001 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As California gets set to launch its unprecedented Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate, two key East Coast states that once marched with it in a united effort to push development of electric-powered and other nonpolluting vehicles are falling behind. The result could be a delay of several years in the launch of zero-emission vehicles in New York and Massachusetts.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel and Marc Lifsher
NEW YORK - California utility customers could one day split more than $100 million if federal regulators settle with JPMorgan Chase & Co. over allegations that the nation's biggest bank manipulated the state's energy market. JPMorgan has been negotiating a settlement with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission over its role in trading electricity in California, according to a source familiar with the matter. It was unclear how much of a settlement would wind up going to the U.S. Treasury and how much might be returned to California ratepayers.
NEWS
January 16, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not that they don't like California up in the Pacific Northwest--not at all. But when Oregon state Sen. John Lim introduced a bill in 1999 to erect signs on the border saying, "You are welcome to visit Oregon, but please don't stay," he got congratulations on the measure from all over the state. (The applause didn't translate into votes; the wording was quickly changed to "Keep Oregon Green" when it was pointed out that Lim himself had moved to Oregon from Korea.
NEWS
March 1, 2001 | DAN MORAIN and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As a hopeful Gov. Gray Davis extended his East Coast barnstorming tour before skeptical Wall Street utility analysts Wednesday, members of California's congressional delegation vowed to continue their campaign for caps on wholesale electricity prices after a tense standoff with a top federal regulator.
NEWS
July 28, 2001 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and DARYL KELLEY and RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Davis administration, stung by charges of excessive secrecy, disclosed late Friday that it has fired five energy consultants because of conflicts of interest involving their official duties and personal finances. A sixth consultant hired to help California purchase electricity has quit, according to state records. All were involved in purchasing electricity for the state from a generator whose stock they owned.
NEWS
March 1, 2001 | DAN MORAIN and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As a hopeful Gov. Gray Davis extended his East Coast barnstorming tour before skeptical Wall Street utility analysts Wednesday, members of California's congressional delegation vowed to continue their campaign for caps on wholesale electricity prices after a tense standoff with a top federal regulator.
NEWS
January 31, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An antiquated and overworked system of electric transmission lines could leave much of California starved for power even if the state can eventually generate and import enough electricity to serve its 34 million residents. The 26,000-mile-long system--enough wire to circle Earth--has long been neglected, a victim of poor planning, unexpected growth in electricity consumption and regulations that make the lines a poor investment from the standpoint of the big utilities.
NEWS
January 16, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not that they don't like California up in the Pacific Northwest--not at all. But when Oregon state Sen. John Lim introduced a bill in 1999 to erect signs on the border saying, "You are welcome to visit Oregon, but please don't stay," he got congratulations on the measure from all over the state. (The applause didn't translate into votes; the wording was quickly changed to "Keep Oregon Green" when it was pointed out that Lim himself had moved to Oregon from Korea.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
As the state's largest utilities contemplate crippling losses and severe rate hikes for consumers and Gov. Gray Davis worries about the effect of an energy crisis on his political future, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power calmly plans for rate reductions and energy reliability over the next 10 years. DWP, the energy ugly duckling turned swan, even offers a vision of how California can solve some of its power shortage problems without massive expenditure and environmental disruption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1995 | MICHAEL R. PEEVEY and MICHAEL C. BURKE, Michael R. Peevey is president and Michael C. Burke is vice president of New Energy Ventures Inc. , Pasadena
Californians pay far too much for electricity. The $18 billion spent on electricity each year by governments, businesses, farmers and residents is due to rates which are among the highest in the nation. But if California creates a truly competitive electricity market--one whose first principle is choice for the customer, not the producer--the price of electricity could drop as much as 50%.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
The $140-million mortgage, a loan from the U.S. Treasury, to build Hoover Dam will be paid in full today. Residential and industrial users of electricity have been paying back the government $5.4 million a year at 3% interest over the last 50 years as part of their monthly utility bills. "I wish we could burn the mortgage or find something to hit with a champagne bottle," said Blaine Hamann, assistant project manager of the dam for the U.S.
NEWS
December 17, 2000
Constitutional crises (or near ones) are like manna from heaven for those whose livelihoods depend on ratings like CNN's Greta Van Susteren. The all-news cable networks enjoyed huge ratings increases, the phone consoles of talk radio stations were lit up like pre-electricity shortage California Christmas trees.
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