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Electricity Crisis

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2000
Your Nov. 20 editorial states: "California's electricity market is a mess." You argue, "Going back to privately owned or state-run monopolies, however, is not the answer." Then, as a kind of afterthought, you note, "Los Angeles was spared the high cost and power shortages because its city-run utility, the Department of Water and Power, is not subject to the illogical state market restrictions." Just where is the logic here? PAUL RAYMER San Diego
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BUSINESS
July 16, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
John Bryson's work life has bounced from environmental activist to California regulator to utility company executive and now to nominee for Commerce secretary. But his career so far has been defined by the one stop he never made — Bankruptcy Court. As chief executive of Edison International, Bryson fought tirelessly to keep the company from collapsing during the California electricity crisis a decade ago. He went on TV to beg customers to conserve energy. And he forged controversial deals with state officials to avoid the fate of fellow utility Pacific Gas & Electric Co., drawing the wrath of consumer groups for locking in high electricity rates to keep Edison out of bankruptcy.
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NEWS
January 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A global electricity crisis with blackouts and curtailed usage will plague the 1990s unless drastic steps are taken to build more power plants, a panel of energy experts warned Saturday. The impending power shortage threatens jobs, public health and economic development, a panel of 31 energy experts from 13 nations concluded after a weeklong meeting at UC Berkeley. "We need strong leadership to address the problem now," said Kenneth Davis, former deputy secretary of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2011 | By Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times
State government was failing at every level. There was an electricity crisis, a water crisis, a prison crisis. Car taxes had tripled. State contracts were tainted by corruption. Financial ruin loomed. In the state's historic recall election, voters turned to Arnold Schwarzenegger, a movie star whose brand was blowing stuff up, flexing muscles and delivering goofy one-liners. Seven years later, with Schwarzenegger's tenure in its final day, the state's schools are in poor shape, the public university system is losing its sheen, the federal courts have taken control of part of the prison system.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2001 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four out of 10 small companies say California's electricity crisis has dimmed their view of the state as a place to do business, and nearly two in 10 are exploring a move to another state, according to a survey released Friday by the National Federation of Independent Business.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the California Public Utilities Commission prepares this week to raise the cost of electricity to consumers, state lawmakers will convene an emergency session likely to generate a wave of energy legislation.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2001
As electricity rate hikes, rolling blackouts and energy rationing continue to beset California businesses, local Assembly and state Senate representatives are scheduled to gather Friday in Irwindale to discuss efforts to contain the state's electricity crisis and hear from local businesses that have been hurt by it. Executives of Miller Brewing, for example, are expected to detail the damage electricity shortages and higher power prices have done to their operations.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2001
Duke Energy Corp., in exchange for refunding alleged overcharges, wants discounts for settling investigations against it and a lowering of the rhetoric as well ["Duke Holds the Cards in High-Powered Game," May 20]. Duke also wants Gov. Davis to indicate that the electricity crisis is the fault of the government and not the industry. Billions of dollars in profit overnight as a result of deregulation are more the product of careful planning, not some hapless slip-up or fault of state government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2001
Tom McClintock (Ventura County Perspective, April 29, 2001) is trying to sell us that old snake oil, nuclear power, as the only solution to our electricity crisis. For sake of argument, let's accept Mr. McClintock's premise that nuclear power can be cheap, clean, safe and abundant. It would still be the wrong way to go. Nuclear power plants are too large, too centralized. When a nuclear plant goes down, megawatts are taken off line all at once. The best solution is for us to develop a diverse system of small generators, conventional and renewable, owned by municipalities and small private companies.
NEWS
January 26, 2001
To help steer California out of its electricity crisis, Gov. Gray Davis has named a trio of unpaid, high-powered advisors with a wide range of experience and styles. Composed of a folksy advocate of public power, a pin-striped Republican crisis manager and a seasoned utility executive, the team will have a major hand in changing the way California handles electricity.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear California's bid to reinstate lawsuits alleging that power companies double-billed during the state's power crisis. The court's decision Monday not to hear the case lets stand a July ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals that said California courts don't have jurisdiction over the dispute between the state and several energy companies. California Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer's lawsuits against Reliant Resources Inc., Dynegy Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2005 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
A state senator accused a San Diego electricity trading company of perjury Wednesday and said other sellers to California during the energy crisis five years ago, including the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, could face similar charges. State Sen. Joe Dunn (D-Santa Ana) said he would refer evidence to the Sacramento County district attorney that Sempra Energy Trading Corp.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2004
I am compelled to respond to Michael Hiltzik's "PG&E's Recovery Stifles Oversight" (Golden State, April 8) regarding Pacific Gas & Electric Co.'s emergence from bankruptcy protection. Mr. Hiltzik would have your readers believe this is a tragic event; however, the settlement approved by the California Public Utilities Commission that allowed PG&E to emerge from bankruptcy has numerous benefits for Californians. The settlement gets PG&E out of bankruptcy and back under regulation by the people's representatives in California, the PUC. The settlement plan is costly, but that is the unfortunate result of the electricity crisis.
OPINION
March 11, 2004 | Jamie Court and Tim Hamilton
If the recent sticker shock at the gasoline pump feels familiar, that's because it is the same old story that led California's electricity market to become the embarrassment of the nation. California Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer is convening today in Los Angeles a panel of industry experts who have blamed the run-up on OPEC crude oil prices, environmentally sensitive fuel and free-market pressures.
OPINION
September 7, 2003 | Peter H. King, Peter H. King's twice-weekly column runs through the recall election.
Let us return to the late spring of 2001, to that crazed period known as the California energy crisis. A summer of blackouts appeared all but inevitable. From Sonoma County came fears that chickens would croak as coops turned into ovens. In the San Joaquin Valley, the canned-tomato crop was said to be at risk. And that was just the farm report. There also was worried talk about the human toll. One study anticipated half a million or more overheated elderly filling California hospitals.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2003 | Nancy Rivera Brooks, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Friday cleared Duke Energy Corp. of accusations that the company shut down its California power plants to drive up prices during the energy crisis of 2000-2001. Duke Energy, which owns four plants in the state capable of generating a total of 4,400 megawatts of electricity, "adequately explained" outages at its California facilities from May 1, 2000, to June 30, 2001, according to a brief FERC staff report released Friday.
OPINION
October 28, 2001
"Davis Orders Hiring Freeze, New Budget Cuts" (Oct. 24) was disheartening. We now see that Gov. Gray Davis not only mishandled the energy crisis in California but has mismanaged our state's budget. The governor has been on a spending spree the last two years as he sought to reward his political backers. Spending in the state's general fund has increased 25% in the last two years ($66.5 billion in 1999-2000 to $82.9 billion in 2001-2002). The governor took what was temporary, one-time money (i.e.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2000 | CHRIS KRAUL and NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The parent company of Southern California Edison announced Friday that it will eliminate 400 contractor jobs, suspend the quarterly dividend paid to its common shareholders and cut $100 million in capital spending as part of its effort to stave off financial collapse brought on by the state's electricity crisis.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2002 | Nancy Rivera Brooks, Times Staff Writer
Closing a dark chapter from California's electricity crisis, Southern California Edison Co. announced Friday that it was ready once again to do what utilities normally do: buy power for customers. PG&E Corp.'s Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and Sempra Energy's San Diego Gas & Electric Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2002 | Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writer
Assaulted and unsettled, millions of Californians head to the polls today to pick a governor, decide whether Los Angeles will cleave itself into parts and express their views on issues ranging from local growth to statewide transportation. The two leading candidates for governor -- Democratic incumbent Gray Davis and Republican challenger Bill Simon Jr. -- led a small army of candidates who swarmed the state Monday to rally their most fervent followers -- and perhaps sway a fence-sitter here or there.
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