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BUSINESS
November 29, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Almost 5 million Southern California Edison Co. customers in hundreds of cities and communities across the southern, central and coastal parts of the state will be hit with higher electric bills early next year and bigger hikes in each of the following two years. The decision, which Edison says will add an average of $7 a month to residential bills for the first year, covers Edison's costs to provide service, which amounts to about half a ratepayer's bill. Other costs for buying fuel and contracting for power deliveries fluctuate and are passed directly to consumers.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- California's electric utilities and other power sellers better hope that scientists and engineers come up with a surefire way to bottle lightning. That's a dramatic way of describing the more prosaic goal of finding a way to store large amounts of electricity, something that, up until now, did not seem practicable. On Thursday, the state Public Utilities Commission voted to create a formal "energy storage target" of 1,325 megawatts -- equivalent to the output of almost three modern, natural gas-fired power plants.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2001
The doubling and tripling of private utility company electricity rates in California is a warning of what may happen if San Fernando Valley residents vote to secede from the city of Los Angeles. Few realize that the City Council of Los Angeles has the legal authority to raise Department of Water and Power electricity rates for the Valley if it secedes based on Los Angeles City Charter section 676 subd. (3), which states: "The [electric] rates inside the City may be less, but not greater, than the rates outside the City for the same or similar uses."
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California lawmakers are poised to pass legislation that could dramatically affect bills for millions of residential customers of Southern California Edison Co. and other state-regulated utilities. People living in temperate climates along the coast would probably see higher bills. Those in torrid regions - the San Joaquin Valley, the Inland Empire and the Mojave Desert - would get some rate relief. Exactly how much rates would change would be left to the Public Utilities Commission after it conducts a detailed, technical investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2000
Re "Legislature OKs San Diego Electric Relief Package," Aug. 31: In San Diego, probably the most conservative big city in the nation, they finally got what they wanted. They got the government to stop interfering in their lives and the free market, by deregulating electric power. Now that deregulation has led to a tripling of their electric bills and rolling brownouts, guess who they want to fix the problem? Hold on to your hats for this one. They now want the government in Sacramento to fix the problem.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California lawmakers are poised to pass legislation that could dramatically affect bills for millions of residential customers of Southern California Edison Co. and other state-regulated utilities. People living in temperate climates along the coast would probably see higher bills. Those in torrid regions - the San Joaquin Valley, the Inland Empire and the Mojave Desert - would get some rate relief. Exactly how much rates would change would be left to the Public Utilities Commission after it conducts a detailed, technical investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1990 | LISA MASCARO
Residents face an 8% increase in electricity rates next month under a rate change requested by the city-owned utility company and approved Tuesday night by the City Council. The jump follows a 9% increase imposed last October. Before then, rates had been stable since 1984. "Even after this increase, our rates will still be lower than Edison," said Darrell Ament, acting general manager of the Public Utilities Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1997
Electricity rates for Pasadena residents will increase by more than 11.28% after the City Council on Monday gave final approval to the increase to pay off the city-owned utility's debt. The increase will go into effect in mid-December. The council's action ratifies a decision last week to opt for a rate increase to help pay off the utility's $156 million in debt by 2002. That year, customers will be able to choose power from any provider.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA
The City Council has voted to adopt new electricity rates that reward customers who conserve electricity and punish heavy users. Under the new rate structure adopted Tuesday night, about 70% of the city's residents would see their electric bills decrease by an average of $1.50 a month, said Ronald Stassi, general manager of the public service department in a report to the council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1985 | Roxana Kopetman \f7
A hike in Anaheim electric bills was placed on hold Tuesday, and a decision on refunding money to electric customers was delayed. Anaheim residents won't see an increase in their electricity bill at least until after January, 1986, because City Council members decided to maintain current rates. At the same time, the Public Utilities Department will take additional time to decide whether to give customers refunds from an $11.3-million settlement with Southern California Edison Co.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
The Department of Water and Power has been taking it in the shorts during the mayoral campaign -- some casual visitor might assume that the DWP is on the ballot. Wendy Greuel's single biggest source of campaign support has been nearly $1.5 million from DWP workers and union members, some of whom are getting six-figure salaries and nice juicy raises that their brethren in City Hall down the hill can only dream of. And Eric Garcetti's campaign and supporters have not been shy about making this a campaign issue.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Almost 5 million Southern California Edison Co. customers in hundreds of cities and communities across the southern, central and coastal parts of the state will be hit with higher electric bills early next year and bigger hikes in each of the following two years. The decision, which Edison says will add an average of $7 a month to residential bills for the first year, covers Edison's costs to provide service, which amounts to about half a ratepayer's bill. Other costs for buying fuel and contracting for power deliveries fluctuate and are passed directly to consumers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2012 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Back-to-back electricity rate hikes totaling 11.1% won preliminary approval Tuesday from the Los Angeles City Council, despite complaints from ratepayers and some members about the size of the utility's salaries. On a 10 to 4 vote, the council approved the Department of Water and Power rate increases, which are expected to generate $321 million by June 2014. The increases, which require a second vote next week, were approved after a city-hired consulting firm found that DWP salaries are "significantly higher" than those at other utilities.
OPINION
August 31, 2012
Re "PUC dithers as consumers keep paying for San Onofre," Column, Aug. 29 There is no "welfare" in the system governed by the California Public Utilities Commission that oversees the delivery of electricity to 12 million customers in California. Here's how it works: Southern California Edison, an investor-owned utility, is the majority owner of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. As a regulated utility, we receive cost reimbursement and a fair investment return over a long period of time on capital that shareholders and creditors advanced up front, as they did for the steam generators - all as part of the costs required to provide emission-free electricity for 1.4 million homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2012 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
Vernon has long been a nirvana for business: Easy access to freeways and rail lines. Low taxes. Cheap, abundant supplies of electricity. Manufacturers, chemical factories and even a giant slaughterhouse thrived in Vernon's friendly confines for much of the past century, free of the protests about noise, exhaust and odors that bedeviled neighboring communities. Largely free, too, of the hordes of pesky residents that can make it so difficult for industry in California towns. But these days, the party seems to be ending.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
That ray of light you see peeking through all the clouds darkening California's future? That's the sun. More specifically, solar power, in which California is the hands-down national leader. The state's installed solar generating capacity of about 1.2 gigawatts - the equivalent of two big conventional power plants and enough to fill the electrical demand from nearly 200,000 homes for a year - easily outstrips the next 10 highest-ranked states. It's also the fastest-growing solar market in the country.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1998 | Nancy Rivera Brooks
Supporters of a proposed initiative that would reduce electricity rates for residential and small-business customers by 20% have begun collecting the approximately 600,000 signatures needed to qualify the measure for the November ballot. The proposed initiative would alter the state's new deregulation law, which begins a restructuring of the state's electricity market on March 31.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2004 | Nancy Rivera Brooks, Times Staff Writer
Just months after receiving more than $1.5 billion in rate cuts and rebates, customers of Southern California Edison will see electricity rates rise about 3% this year. The rate increase announced Thursday will add about $1.50 to the monthly bill for an average household and about $3 to the monthly bill for a typical small business served by SCE, said Akbar Jazayeri, SCE's director of revenue and tariffs. The increase is effective Jan. 1 and should begin appearing on customer bills next month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2011 | By David Zahniser
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's appointees at the Department of Water and Power took the first step Thursday toward imposing electric rate increases of up to 28%, despite complaints from neighborhood activists and business groups. On a 4-0 vote, the board agreed to increase the cost of electricity by 0.8 cents per kilowatt hour, the first of four increases planned over the next year to help the nation's largest municipal utility cover its financial commitments and continue Villaraigosa's plan for securing more renewable power.
OPINION
July 4, 2011 | Jim Newton
The view from the top floor of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power testifies to its place in the life and history of the city. To the north and west are Silver Lake and the Hollywood Hills, dotted with reservoirs that define neighborhoods and store water; over the horizon lies the San Fernando Valley, made possible when the DWP grabbed water from the Owens Valley and brought it to Los Angeles. And to the southeast sits City Hall. Notably, the seat of city government is at the bottom of the hill; the DWP is at the top. Today, that agency is under new leadership and facing a combination of new and familiar challenges.
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