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Electroencephalograms

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NEWS
October 4, 1992 | JEANNE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Susan Callison will never forget how terrified she was when at the beginning of second grade, it took her son, Chad, two hours to complete a simple homework assignment. "I remember working with him on the word boat. I used pictures, everything, to try to help him recognize the word," recalls the El Toro mother and former teacher. "But after 20 minutes of working, he still didn't have a clue. It was frightening."
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NEWS
October 4, 1992 | JEANNE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Susan Callison will never forget how terrified she was when at the beginning of second grade, it took her son, Chad, two hours to complete a simple homework assignment. "I remember working with him on the word boat. I used pictures, everything, to try to help him recognize the word," recalls the El Toro mother and former teacher. "But after 20 minutes of working, he still didn't have a clue. It was frightening."
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SCIENCE
February 18, 2002
Q: Is it true that some animals sleep with only half their brain? A: Yes. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) have shown that some species of birds and some aquatic mammals sleep with only half their brain at one time, while the other half remains alert and functioning. Such sleep habits allow the mammals to continue swimming and rise to the surface for air while at least part of their brain is getting a good night's rest. The half of the brain sleeping apparently alternates.
SCIENCE
April 24, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Want a better grip on your memory? A study suggests clenching a fist could play a role in how well you recall information. The study , published Tuesday in the journal PLOS ONE, was funded partially by the U.S. Army. It examined whether clenching the right or left fist could stimulate brain regions possibly connected to memory. Researchers recruited 51 right-handed individuals for the experiment, and asked them to squeeze a pink rubber ball for 90 seconds before they were shown a list of 36 words.
SCIENCE
August 20, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
If you can't quite get that nine-note treble opening to " Fur Elise," just sleep on it. The brain will rehearse, reorganize and nail the sequential motor tasks that help you play piano or type on a keyboard. How that consolidation of memory happens has remained largely a mystery, despite telling evidence that the brain's motor cortex appears to be quite busy during sleep. Now, a team led by Brown University neuroscientists believes it has found the source of the sleeping piano lesson, and it's not where many expected it to be. Neuroscience has been fixated since its founding on why the brain “needs” that peculiar mix of dormancy and random activity known as sleep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1998 | STEVE HARVEY
The latest urban folk tale making the rounds in this area concerns a woman who phoned an exterminator to report that something was "growling" in her bedroom closet. Then, according to the story passed along to me by Ernest Fujimura, a technician is dispatched to the scene only to find that the noisy creature was "her husband's pager, which was in the closet, set on 'vibrate.' In her panic, she kept paging him, which of course kept setting it off."
HEALTH
March 19, 2001 | JUDY FOREMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most of the time, it's pretty easy for doctors to tell when someone's dead: The person's breathing and heartbeat have stopped, and he or she can't be revived. After Congress passed the Uniform Determination of Death Act in 1981, however, the overwhelming majority of organ donors have been declared dead by a very different standard: Machines keep their hearts and lungs pumping, but doctors determined that their brain and brain stem have irreversibly stopped functioning.
SCIENCE
June 12, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A quadriplegic has used thought to make a robotic hand feed her chocolate. A monkey moved a computer cursor using brain waves. But how the brain “learns” to control something without sending the signal through a spine and nerves remains a mystery. It turns out we learn to move a robotic arm or computer cursor with the same neurons we use to learn to ride a bicycle or catch a ball. On a neurobiological level, that deceptively simple truth could have profound impact on how future devices could help those who have suffered a stroke or paralysis.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1990 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the late 1960s, a group of UC San Diego physicists developed an experimental tool called a magnetometer to measure the Earth's magnetic fields. After seeing that there was ample demand for the device from other physicists, they formed a company now known as Biomagnetic Technologies to manufacture the product.
NEWS
April 15, 1985 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
For more years than she cares to remember, Dr. Joan Hodgman, director of the newborn service at County-USC Medical Center, has been troubled by the knowledge that she and other physicians who care for dying infants lack a simple, safe and effective method of telling when their patients are brain dead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day after Ross Perot yanked his hat out of the political ring, a group that calls itself the Natural Law Party brought its presidential candidate to Los Angeles to put voters' minds at ease--literally. The candidate is John Hagelin, a soft-spoken physicist who teaches at Maharishi International University in Iowa. His message: mellow out.
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