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BUSINESS
October 25, 1993 | From The Christian Science Monitor
The inside of a bank is becoming unfamiliar territory to many Americans. In the past five years, the number of automated teller machines (ATMs) has gone from 72,000 to 87,000. In 1992, a third of all banking transactions were completed outside of banks. Now banks are racing to offer their customers even more electronic banking options. Signet Banking Corp. in Richmond, Va., recently introduced Touch Tone billing.
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BUSINESS
June 10, 2007 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
If you vacation outside the country this summer, you might come home to find your checking account smaller than expected. Who raided it? Don't blame the kids. It might have been your bank. The fees charged by banks as well as other financial institutions to use foreign automated teller machines can deplete cash faster than lunch in London. Some U.S. banks charge as much as $5, plus a percentage, every time a debit card they issued is used at a foreign ATM. Not that you would know it at the time.
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NEWS
January 18, 2000
Alfred Zipf, 82, Bank of America executive considered the father of electronic banking. In a four-decade career with the bank, Zipf rose from a Los Angeles transit clerk sorting checks by hand in 1935 to senior administrative officer in charge of the California branch operation and computer system in 1976.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2004 | From Associated Press
For the first time, Americans' use of credit cards, debit cards and other electronic bill paying has eclipsed paper checks. The number of electronic payment transactions last year totaled 44.5 billion -- exceeding the number of checks paid, 36.7 billion -- according to Federal Reserve studies released Monday. That's a first, the Fed said.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1995 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Electronic commerce and banking, a market that so far has been long on promise and short on returns, has gotten a huge shot in the arm from Microsoft Corp.'s ill-fated attempt to acquire personal finance software maker Intuit Inc. Microsoft's intention to buy Intuit--an acquisition that would have given Microsoft a dominant position in personal finance software--served as a wake-up call to bankers who had been slow to offer customers electronic banking as a new service.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Visa Moves Toward Electronic Banking: Millions of consumers will be able to pay their bills over the telephone or through personal computers as early as fall following Visa International's purchase of U.S. Order's electronic banking operations. A new subsidiary, Visa Interactive, will market the system to the 16,000 banks, savings and loans and credit unions now on its network, said Visa, the world's largest credit card company, with more than 343.6 million cardholders.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1989 | GENE YASUDA, Times Staff Writer
Debby Kyle's worries began early in the 1980s, when financial giant Bank of America began an aggressive campaign to set up automated teller machines across the state, creating an electronic banking system that today boasts more than 1,500 ATMs. Kyle was then ATM director for La Jolla Bank & Trust, a mid-size bank with fewer than 10 ATMs.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1986
John M. Mickel, a BankAmerica executive vice president, said he has resigned from the bank to "pursue other interests." Mickel's departure is part of a continuing exodus of ranking officials from San Francisco-based BankAmerica. Mickel, 46, said he left because of major reductions in his department, which handles strategic planning and marketing for the bank's consumer banking division. Staffing in the unit was cut to 20 employees from 55 last week.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1997 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You step up to an ATM machine in a grocery store or at the mall, punch in your name and Social Security number, and apply for a loan. The computer runs a credit check, approves the loan, and the machine prints out a cashier's check for the amount you borrowed. This could be the loan of the future--electronic credit approved without visiting an office or having a face-to-face interview with a loan officer.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2003 | Michael Hiltzik
These are cynical times, and journalists are a cynical bunch. But that's no reason not to give proper credit to a large corporation -- indeed, pretty much to an entire industry --that figures out how to do right by consumers while doing right by itself. This thought occurred to me a few weeks ago while I was reviewing my Bank of America checking account via the bank's Web site.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2001 | LIZ PULLIAM WESTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Visa USA and four major banks took direct aim at the check-cashing industry Tuesday by rolling out a prepaid card that can replace paychecks for workers who don't have bank accounts. Employers can "deposit" employee wages onto the cards, and workers can then use the plastic to withdraw cash at automated teller machines, pay for purchases at stores that accept Visa credit cards and even pay certain bills, said Nizam Antoo, Visa's product manager for the card.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2000 | EILEEN ALT POWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Two of the biggest banks in America and IBM Corp. are setting up a new, electronic processing system that could greatly reduce bank costs in handling paper checks. The system, known as Viewpointe Archive Services, also will make it possible for consumers to get copies of their checks from Web sites and automated teller machines maintained by banks. The system--launched by Bank of America Corp., headquartered in Charlotte, N.C.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a population smaller than Greater Los Angeles, Finland leads the world in electronic banking, surpassing such financial powerhouses as the United States, Germany and Japan. But by embracing technology to bridge the vast distances across which Finland's 5.4 million residents are scattered, a Nordic banking consortium has sprinted ahead of the big players and set a standard for service and security that more weighty competitors will need years to match.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2000 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, Internet-only banks vowed to swim circles around traditional financial institutions, which the virtual crowd predicted would sink under the weight of old-fashioned branches and costly infrastructure. Today, it is the branchless banks that are barely treading water. Despite offering substantially higher rates on deposits, budding Net-based banks as a group have scraped together little more than one-tenth of 1% of the nation's bank deposits.
NEWS
January 18, 2000
Alfred Zipf, 82, Bank of America executive considered the father of electronic banking. In a four-decade career with the bank, Zipf rose from a Los Angeles transit clerk sorting checks by hand in 1935 to senior administrative officer in charge of the California branch operation and computer system in 1976.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1999
Internet banking companies Digital Insight Corp. in Calabasas, and nFront Inc. in Atlanta, have signed a definitive agreement to merge in a stock-for-stock exchange of .579 shares of Digital Insight for each share of nFront. The equity value of the transaction to nFront shareholders is about $439 million. The company will operate under the name Digital Insight with headquarters in Calabasas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1998 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the concept of the ubiquitous bank branch may be going the way of the Pony Express, banking and economics experts predict that most San Fernando Valley consumers will still have ready access to cash and services. Eleven Washington Mutual branches in the Valley and nearby communities are scheduled to close by mid-1999 as a result of that company's acquisition of H. F. Ahmanson & Co., parent of Home Savings of America.
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