Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsElectronic Equipment
IN THE NEWS

Electronic Equipment

BUSINESS
April 23, 2007 | From the Associated Press
BlackBerry maker Research in Motion Ltd. is introducing a software application that can make Palm Treos and other Windows-based mobile devices made by rivals work like BlackBerrys. The software, due in the fall, is designed to extend BlackBerry's dominance by offering an option to individuals who may not want to switch devices to get the service, and to companies that would like to give employees a wider selection of hand-helds without being forced to support multiple mobile e-mail platforms.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 21, 2007 | From the Associated Press
After two days of frustrating silence about a lengthy outage in its BlackBerry e-mail service, the company that makes the addictive mobile communication device issued a jargon-laden update indicating a minor software upgrade had crashed the system. The statement late Thursday night by Research in Motion Ltd.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Nine television broadcasters said they formed the Open Mobile Video Coalition to accelerate the development of programs for mobile devices. The broadcasters represent more than 280 TV stations and reach 95 million U.S. households. They include Belo Corp., Fox Television Stations, Gannett Broadcasting, Gray Television, ION Media Networks, the NBC & Telemundo Television Stations, Sinclair Broadcast Group and Tribune Broadcasting, the coalition said.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2007 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Owners of the Xbox 360 video game console will soon be able to send instant messages while gunning down aliens or scoring touchdowns. Microsoft Corp. said it would add Windows Live Messenger to the console's online capabilities in early May so players could chat with anyone who had an instant messenger account. "Xbox owners can expand their network beyond gamers," said Aaron Greenberg, product manager for Xbox 360 and Xbox Live, the console's online service.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2007 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
Apple Inc., which changed how people listen to music with its iPod, on Wednesday launched a set-top box that it hopes will transform how people watch videos in their homes. Apple TV enables users to wirelessly stream video and music from computers to televisions. The Cupertino, Calif.-based company said it began shipping the $299 product to customers who had pre-ordered it. The device is expected in Apple stores this week.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Sony Corp. said Monday that it was bringing out a cheaper player for Blu-ray discs early this summer, a crucial step in its battle to make the high-definition format the replacement for DVDs. The BDP-S300 will cost $599 yet will have the same capabilities as the $999 BDP-S1 that Sony is currently selling, said Randy Waynick, senior vice president of the home products division of Sony Electronics. Sony and Samsung Corp., which also makes a Blu-ray player, have been undersold by Toshiba Corp.'
BUSINESS
January 23, 2007 | From the Associated Press
German and French consumer groups have joined a Scandinavian-led drive to force Apple Inc. to make its iTunes online store compatible with digital music players made by rival companies, a Norwegian official said. Currently, songs purchased and downloaded through iTunes are designed to work with Apple's market-leading iPod players but not competitors' models. In June, consumer agencies in Norway, Denmark and Sweden claimed that Apple was violating contract and copyright laws in their countries.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Microsoft Corp.'s Zune music and video player, intended as a rival to Apple Inc.'s market-dominating iPod, can't share some songs, potentially eroding a key advantage over the iPod. Microsoft on Monday blamed the difficulty on the fact that "wireless sharing is a new experience and its implementation is in a version 1.0 stage." The company denied reports that record companies such as Universal Music Group were preventing sharing of some artists.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2007 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
Cisco to Apple: We need to talk. A day after Apple Inc. baptized its eagerly anticipated super-cellphone with the marketing slogan "We need to talk," Cisco Systems Inc. filed a trademark lawsuit Wednesday pointing out that it has owned the iPhone name since 2000. Until Monday night, the two companies were negotiating over the name. Cisco, which acquired the name when it bought another company, was willing to "share," Cisco spokeswoman Terry Anderson said. Apple, apparently, was not.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|