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Electronic Equipment

WORLD
January 27, 2009 | times wire reports
A New Zealand man who bought an MP3 player from a thrift shop in Oklahoma found 60 U.S. military files, including names and phone numbers for soldiers who served in Afghanistan and Iraq, TV One News reported today. Chris Ogle said he found the files when he linked the device to his computer. Details of equipment at bases in Afghanistan and a mission briefing were found too, the report said. In 2006, the Los Angeles Times found stolen flash drives containing secret military data for sale at Afghan shops.
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BUSINESS
January 23, 2009 | Christi Parsons and Jim Puzzanghera
OMG! POTUS keeps his BB. After facing down his top security advisors, President Obama won the right Thursday to be the BlackBerry user-in-chief. Under an arrangement with security aides, Obama will get a new BlackBerry loaded with software approved by U.S. intelligence officials that lets him communicate with friends, family and close associates without fear of hackers reading his e-mail.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2009 | Alex Pham and Michelle Maltais
Though 2009 looks just as grim as 2008, organizers of the Consumer Electronics Show last week forecast a few rays of sunshine. The Consumer Electronics Assn. projected growth in organic LED displays, digital book readers, Blu-ray disc players and lightweight laptops called netbooks. Despite a projected 0.3% decline in overall consumer spending in 2009, the trade group said, people will continue to earmark a large chunk of their income for technology.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2009 | Alex Pham
Children and seniors demand many of the same things from their technology: They want it to work right away. They don't want it to do a million things. And they need it to be secure. "Both groups need simple things with less functionality and more protection," said Robin Raskin, a former PC Magazine editor who founded twin conference sessions on technology for the two age groups at this week's Consumer Electronics Show.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2009 | Michelle Maltais
Children and seniors demand many of the same things from their technology: They want it to work right away. They don't want it to do a million things. And they need it to be secure. "Both groups need simple things with less functionality and more protection," said Robin Raskin, a former PC Magazine editor who founded twin conference sessions on technology for the two age groups at this week's Consumer Electronics Show.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2009 | David Colker
The latest in television technology is on display at the annual Consumer Electronics Show, with super-thin screens, three-dimensional imagery, wireless connections and ultra-sharp picture quality. Too bad you can't afford it. All of this state-of-the-art TV tech -- much of it not yet available -- is extremely expensive, which is even more of a consideration for buyers in these recessionary times. But it's fun to dream.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2009 | Scott J. Wilson
If you received a TV, DVD player or other electronic device for the holidays, you may find yourself wrestling with wires and cables trying to connect the new equipment to what you already have. Wirewize aims to help, offering connection instructions for your exact combination of electronic components. At the home page, click on "Get started."
BUSINESS
December 19, 2008 | Dawn C. Chmielewski
Now the iPod can answer the question: Am iDrunk? A new product called the iBreath turns Apple Inc.'s iPod into an alcohol breathalyzer. The $79 accessory plugs into the base of the iPod and functions like a field sobriety test. The person using the iBreath exhales into a retractable "blow wand" and the internal sensor measures the blood-alcohol content. Within two seconds, it displays the results on an LED screen. A reading of 0.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy
Despite official claims that state government is becoming more environmentally friendly, the Department of Justice, Highway Patrol, Caltrans and other agencies have been improperly disposing of electronic devices, creating a potential hazardous waste problem at landfills, state auditors said Tuesday. The audit said the actions were contrary to state regulations. "Because e-waste can contain toxic metals such as lead and mercury, these state agencies may have contributed to environmental contamination that can pose a threat to public health and safety," the audit concluded.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2008 | Alana Semuels, Semuels is a Times staff writer
Move over, Motorola. Apple Inc.'s iPhone has shaved away your lead in the mobile phone market, passing the Razr to become the top handset bought by U.S. adult consumers in the third quarter of 2008, according to research firm NPD Group. The Razr had held on to the lead spot for 12 quarters. Consumers are buying more iPhones than Razrs because there is a "watershed shift in handset design from fashion to fashionable functionality," said Ross Rubin, NPD's director of industry analysis.
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