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January 13, 2002 | SCOTT HARRIS, Scott Harris last wrote for the magazine for the December 1999 millennium issue
We're bombing Afghanistan, anthrax is in the mail, and all across America it looks like Stars and Stripes forever. It is the evening of Oct. 11, one month into the war on terrorism, and Congress is cooking up something that will be called the USA Patriot Act. This sweeping law includes a dramatic expansion of Internet surveillance, unprecedented sharing of information between government agencies, stiffer penalties for computer crimes and greater power to detain noncitizens.
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BUSINESS
April 1, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- A San Francisco lawmaker wants to protect your emails from random scrutiny by law enforcement. State Sen. Mark Leno has introduced legislation to require courts to issue search warrants before companies such as Google Inc., Yahoo Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Facebook turn them over. “No law enforcement agency could obtain someone's mail or letters that were delivered to their home without first securing a search warrant, but that same protection is surprisingly not extended to our digital life,” said the San Francisco Democrat.
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BUSINESS
October 4, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
A San Francisco privacy group sued the Justice Department seeking information about electronic surveillance systems used to intercept personal communications. The Electronic Frontier Foundation said it had filed a lawsuit after the U.S. failed to respond to a Freedom of Information request for records about two FBI surveillance systems. "Recent allegations of domestic spying by the U.S.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - If the director of the CIA cannot keep the FBI from rummaging through his private Gmail account, what digital privacy protections do ordinary citizens have? Precious few, say privacy advocates. As the law stands now, law enforcement can secretly gain access to people's email, often without a search warrant. "When the government goes looking, it can find out pretty much everything about our lives," said Chris Calabrese, legislative counsel for the ACLU. That's because the main law governing digital privacy - the Electronic Communications Privacy Act or ECPA - was passed in 1986.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1999 | Jube Shiver Jr.
Microsoft Corp. joined the Electronic Frontier Foundation in voicing support for a new privacy technology aimed at bolstering consumer confidence in the fair handling of personal information consumers provide to Web sites. The technology, called Privacy Preference Project, or P3P, is designed to simplify the way privacy policies on Web sites can be created, publicized and policed by Web surfers and industry watchdog organizations. Polls have found that privacy is the No.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. government has asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit by a San Francisco civil liberties group against AT&T Corp., because it says the case could reveal military and state secrets.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dozen consumer advocacy and civil liberties groups urged a federal judge Friday to reject the major record companies' attempt to force Verizon Internet Services to identify a customer accused of extensive music piracy. The groups--including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the National Consumers League and Utility Consumers' Action Network--argued that anonymous speech should receive strong protection even in claims of copyright infringement.
BUSINESS
February 29, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
This post has been corrected. Please see note at bottom for details. Google  Inc. is changing its privacy policy Thursday, a move that is causing a lot of anxiety among Internet activists and some users.  The changes in effect allow the world's largest Internet company to collect information about its users across all its products, services and websites and store it in one place. The idea, Google says, is to create a comprehensive portrait of its users so it can offer more personalized services.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- A San Francisco lawmaker wants to protect your emails from random scrutiny by law enforcement. State Sen. Mark Leno has introduced legislation to require courts to issue search warrants before companies such as Google Inc., Yahoo Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Facebook turn them over. “No law enforcement agency could obtain someone's mail or letters that were delivered to their home without first securing a search warrant, but that same protection is surprisingly not extended to our digital life,” said the San Francisco Democrat.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Facebook continues to face criticism over privacy protections at its social networking website. Privacy and civil liberties groups on Wednesday urged Facebook to address issues they say violate the privacy of the site's more than 400 million users. In an open letter to Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg, the groups applauded steps the company has taken to make it easier for users to change privacy settings. But it asked for additional measures, such as allowing users to control all of the information they share on Facebook and making it easier to export their data and easier to quit Facebook.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court has ended a 6-year-old class-action lawsuit against the nation's telecommunications carriers for secretly helping the National Security Agency monitor phone calls and emails coming into and out of this country. The suit was dealt a death blow in 2008 when Congress granted a retroactive immunity to people or companies coming to the aid of U.S. intelligence agents. Without comment, the justices turned down appeals from civil liberties advocates who contended this mass surveillance was unconstitutional and illegal.
BUSINESS
February 29, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
This post has been corrected. Please see note at bottom for details. Google  Inc. is changing its privacy policy Thursday, a move that is causing a lot of anxiety among Internet activists and some users.  The changes in effect allow the world's largest Internet company to collect information about its users across all its products, services and websites and store it in one place. The idea, Google says, is to create a comprehensive portrait of its users so it can offer more personalized services.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
During his two-hour morning bike ride, Eric Hartman doesn't pay much attention to his iPhone. But the iPhone is paying attention to him. As he traverses the 30-mile circuit around Seal Beach, Hartman's iPhone knows precisely where he is at every moment, and keeps a record of his whereabouts. That data is beamed to Apple Inc. multiple times each day, whether Hartman is using his phone to take pictures, search for gas stations or check the weather. And it's not just the iPhone that's keeping track.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
The FBI disclosed to a presidential board that it was involved in nearly 800 violations of laws, regulations or policies governing national security investigations from 2001 to 2008, but the government won't provide details or say whether anyone was disciplined, according to a report by a privacy watchdog group. The San Francisco-based Electronic Frontier Foundation sued under the Freedom of Information Act to obtain about 2,500 documents that the FBI submitted to the President's Intelligence Oversight Board.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Facebook continues to face criticism over privacy protections at its social networking website. Privacy and civil liberties groups on Wednesday urged Facebook to address issues they say violate the privacy of the site's more than 400 million users. In an open letter to Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg, the groups applauded steps the company has taken to make it easier for users to change privacy settings. But it asked for additional measures, such as allowing users to control all of the information they share on Facebook and making it easier to export their data and easier to quit Facebook.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
A San Francisco privacy group sued the Justice Department seeking information about electronic surveillance systems used to intercept personal communications. The Electronic Frontier Foundation said it had filed a lawsuit after the U.S. failed to respond to a Freedom of Information request for records about two FBI surveillance systems. "Recent allegations of domestic spying by the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1994 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Age: 43 Accomplishments: Founded Lotus Development Corp. Co-founded the to promote free and open communications in the digital world. Education: Bachelor's from Yale College, with interdisciplinary major in cybernetics. Master's in psychology from Beacon College. Interests: Eastern religion, reading, mountain biking on Martha's Vineyard Family: Kapor and his wife, Ellen Poss, a psychiatrist, have a young daughter and son. They live in Brookline, Mass.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2001 | Dave Wilson
A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit by a Princeton University computer scientist who claimed that legal threats from the music industry prevented him from discussing security problems for digital music distribution. Judge Garrett Brown of the Federal District Court in Trenton, N.J., ignored arguments from professor Edward Felten that the music industry violated his 1st Amendment rights to free speech. The Recording Industry Assn.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. government has asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit by a San Francisco civil liberties group against AT&T Corp., because it says the case could reveal military and state secrets.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Apple Computer Inc., the maker of iMac computers and iPod music players, can force three online publishers to disclose where they obtained confidential information about new Apple products, a judge has tentatively ruled. Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge James Kleinberg declined to shield the publishers from Apple's inquiries.
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