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Electronic Mail

BUSINESS
January 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
Telephone users who don't own computers can now shop, pay bills and, in some cases, read the news or exchange electronic messages from home through two low-cost services announced Tuesday. Like cable television companies, both services provide the equipment--a special telephone in one case and a terminal that hooks up to a home phone in another--and charge customers a basic monthly fee.
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NEWS
October 12, 1990 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Alice McLerran's father lay dying in a Rancho Bernardo retirement home, she was at his bedside--with her laptop computer. McLerran tapped out a stream of messages on her keyboard, sending updates on her father's condition to everyone from a sister in Lexington, Mass., to a son in Seattle to a cousin in Dublin, Ohio. Her scattered family shot back words of support. "I knew that by having the laptop, I could keep everyone close by," said McLerran, a children's book author from Minneapolis.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Messages flashing on the Macintosh computer screens at the offices of San Francisco/Moscow Teleport tell of tanks rumbling through Moscow and crowds massed in the streets shouting support for Boris Yeltsin and other opponents of the right-wing coup. "We are ready to give the hunta (sic) an airplane so they would fly away from our country," one politician is quoted as telling the gathering.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | JEFFREY BAIR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When a worker discovered the kickstand on his motor scooter had been broken in his company's parking lot, a speedy way to express his rage was right at his fingertips. He used his employer's electronic mail to denounce 300 people at once with profanities in CAPITAL LETTERS and these other harsh words: "If I discover anyone tampering with my scooter again, I will cheerfully rearrange your face w/the 'generic blunt object' I carry with me."
BUSINESS
February 24, 1992 | JEFFREY BAIR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When a worker discovered the kickstand on his motor scooter had been broken in his company's parking lot, a speedy way to express his rage was right at his fingertips. He used his employer's electronic mail to denounce 300 people at once with profanities in capital letters and these other harsh words: "If I discover anyone tampering with my scooter again, I will cheerfully rearrange your face with the 'generic blunt object' I carry with me."
BOOKS
October 30, 1994 | Daniel Akst, Former Times staffer Daniel Akst (akst@netcom.com) is a writer in Los Angeles
Poor William Strunk Jr. Sure, he's achieved immortality; thanks tB. White's revival and expansion of his classic, "The Elements of Style," he lives on wherever clear, forceful writing is cherished. But thank God the late professor didn't live to see the bevy of illegitimate "Elements of" progeny stumbling along in his durable footsteps. The latest of these descendants, perhaps reflecting the declining vigor of the genre, is surely among the most dim-witted. "The Elements of E-mail Style" takes as its premise that electronic mail, to which I confess a middling addiction, is a different medium that requires a different kind of writing--one "that is clear and concise without sacrificing speed."
NEWS
June 2, 1993 | From Reuters
The White House began receiving electronic mail Tuesday through Internet, a nonprofit system that connects universities, businesses and other organizations by computer. President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore notified the public about the new service through a letter posted on the system. "As we work to reinvent government and streamline our processes, the E-mail project can help to put us on the leading edge of progress," Clinton and Gore said in the letter.
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