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Electronic Tracking Devices

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TRAVEL
April 4, 2004 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
If you care about your privacy or your pocketbook, ask whether your rental car has electronic tracking equipment and what it's used for. The answers may surprise you -- if you can get them. Since I last wrote about this issue in 2002, more rental cars have been fitted with such systems, which can instantly relay information on your car's speed, route and position to the rental company. This is done by wireless devices and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers that pinpoint location.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2007 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger wants the state to track scores of violent gang parolees the way it does sex offenders, monitoring them with ankle devices and maintaining a statewide database that records their movements. On Friday, the governor proposed extending a pilot program -- used to monitor 20 gang members in San Bernardino -- to Los Angeles, Sacramento and Fresno as part of what he called a comprehensive strategy to combat gang violence.
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NEWS
February 2, 1987 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
Two years of successful experience in 20 states has increased the interest of law enforcement agencies in the use of electronic tracking devices to check on the movements of parolees, probationers and individuals awaiting trial for minor offenses, a Justice Department agency reported Sunday. James K. Stewart, director of the National Institute of Justice, said monitoring devices that vary according to the degree of supervision required have been used in 45 programs involving 900 individuals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2006 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
Question: "Chief, you said Los Angeles is the car chase capital of the world. What makes it that way?" Answer: "There are a lot of nuts here." With that street-cop psychology, Chief William J. Bratton unveiled Thursday a new and decidedly strange weapon in the LAPD's effort to halt high-speed pursuits. It is an air-propelled miniature dart equipped with a global positioning device. Once fired from a patrol car, it sticks to a fleeing motorist's vehicle and emits a radio signal to police.
NEWS
September 3, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine that police could tail drug dealers without the risk of being seen, that detectives tracking a pedophile could monitor his every move from the comfort of the squad room. Imagine that an FBI agent, standing 60 feet from a bank robber, could use a hand-held scanner to determine whether he was armed--and with what. Sound like science fiction? Not at all. Such high-tech tools are either within the arsenal of law enforcement now or will be soon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2007 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger wants the state to track scores of violent gang parolees the way it does sex offenders, monitoring them with ankle devices and maintaining a statewide database that records their movements. On Friday, the governor proposed extending a pilot program -- used to monitor 20 gang members in San Bernardino -- to Los Angeles, Sacramento and Fresno as part of what he called a comprehensive strategy to combat gang violence.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2005 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
Gene Mahoney considers daredevil drivers a major culprit in the high cost of auto insurance, and he doesn't want to pay for their recklessness. So he recently agreed to install a feature in his 1997 Isuzu Rodeo that he hopes will cut his premiums: an electronic monitor to record how far and fast he drives. In six months, he'll transfer the monitor's data to his home computer and send it electronically to his auto insurer, Progressive Corp.
NEWS
November 25, 2003 | J. Michael Kennedy
A camper lost in the Adirondack Mountains earlier this month may have signaled a new era in wilderness safety when he activated his personal locator beacon. With the help of the device, he was rescued within hours. It marked the first rescue in the United States involving a PLB, as they are called, since the devices became available in July. After the PLB was activated, the signal was picked up at the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2006 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
Question: "Chief, you said Los Angeles is the car chase capital of the world. What makes it that way?" Answer: "There are a lot of nuts here." With that street-cop psychology, Chief William J. Bratton unveiled Thursday a new and decidedly strange weapon in the LAPD's effort to halt high-speed pursuits. It is an air-propelled miniature dart equipped with a global positioning device. Once fired from a patrol car, it sticks to a fleeing motorist's vehicle and emits a radio signal to police.
NEWS
August 19, 1992 | LYNN SIMROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Welcome to Los Angeles County, the nation's auto theft capital, where a car is stolen every 3.8 minutes despite residents trying everything short of electrifying their vehicles. They use steering-wheel lock bars, telescoping locks securing the brake pedal to the steering wheel and simple or elaborate electronic alarms that shriek or speak. There's even an alarm that looks like a harmless Teddy bear sitting on the seat that activates when a thief enters the car.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2005 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
Gene Mahoney considers daredevil drivers a major culprit in the high cost of auto insurance, and he doesn't want to pay for their recklessness. So he recently agreed to install a feature in his 1997 Isuzu Rodeo that he hopes will cut his premiums: an electronic monitor to record how far and fast he drives. In six months, he'll transfer the monitor's data to his home computer and send it electronically to his auto insurer, Progressive Corp.
TRAVEL
April 4, 2004 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
If you care about your privacy or your pocketbook, ask whether your rental car has electronic tracking equipment and what it's used for. The answers may surprise you -- if you can get them. Since I last wrote about this issue in 2002, more rental cars have been fitted with such systems, which can instantly relay information on your car's speed, route and position to the rental company. This is done by wireless devices and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers that pinpoint location.
NEWS
November 25, 2003 | J. Michael Kennedy
A camper lost in the Adirondack Mountains earlier this month may have signaled a new era in wilderness safety when he activated his personal locator beacon. With the help of the device, he was rescued within hours. It marked the first rescue in the United States involving a PLB, as they are called, since the devices became available in July. After the PLB was activated, the signal was picked up at the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia.
NEWS
September 3, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine that police could tail drug dealers without the risk of being seen, that detectives tracking a pedophile could monitor his every move from the comfort of the squad room. Imagine that an FBI agent, standing 60 feet from a bank robber, could use a hand-held scanner to determine whether he was armed--and with what. Sound like science fiction? Not at all. Such high-tech tools are either within the arsenal of law enforcement now or will be soon.
NEWS
August 19, 1992 | LYNN SIMROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Welcome to Los Angeles County, the nation's auto theft capital, where a car is stolen every 3.8 minutes despite residents trying everything short of electrifying their vehicles. They use steering-wheel lock bars, telescoping locks securing the brake pedal to the steering wheel and simple or elaborate electronic alarms that shriek or speak. There's even an alarm that looks like a harmless Teddy bear sitting on the seat that activates when a thief enters the car.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1990 | PATRICIA KLEIN LERNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Cheers" actor Kelsey Grammer pleaded no contest Monday to possessing cocaine and was sentenced to 90 days' house arrest, wearing an electronic device that will allow authorities to keep track of his whereabouts. The sentence--the second for Grammer in less than three months--allows him to leave his Van Nuys home to work in the popular NBC television series. A signal from the device, which will be locked to his wrist or ankle, will track his whereabouts for authorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1990 | PATRICIA KLEIN LERNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Cheers" actor Kelsey Grammer pleaded no contest Monday to possessing cocaine and was sentenced to 90 days' house arrest, wearing an electronic device that will allow authorities to keep track of his whereabouts. The sentence--the second for Grammer in less than three months--allows him to leave his Van Nuys home to work in the popular NBC television series. A signal from the device, which will be locked to his wrist or ankle, will track his whereabouts for authorities.
NEWS
February 2, 1987
Two years of successful use in 20 states has increased interest in electronic tracking devices to check on the movements of parolees, probationers and individuals awaiting trial for minor offenses, a Justice Department agency reported. James K. Stewart, director of the National Institute of Justice, said monitoring devices that vary according to the degree of supervision required have been used in 45 programs involving 900 individuals.
NEWS
February 2, 1987 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
Two years of successful experience in 20 states has increased the interest of law enforcement agencies in the use of electronic tracking devices to check on the movements of parolees, probationers and individuals awaiting trial for minor offenses, a Justice Department agency reported Sunday. James K. Stewart, director of the National Institute of Justice, said monitoring devices that vary according to the degree of supervision required have been used in 45 programs involving 900 individuals.
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