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BUSINESS
July 1, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The technology gods tell us that in the not-so-distant future, our cameras won't use film and our tape recorders won't use tape. So what will they use? That depends on whom you ask. Three companies--including Toshiba in Irvine as well as Intel and Sandisk in Santa Clara--have three slightly different ideas. Trouble is, high-tech history dating back to the Beta-VHS videotape wars tells us that only one can win.
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BUSINESS
February 17, 1992 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Considering the backdrop of tense relations between the United States and Japan, members of the Electronic Industries Assn. of Japan could not have expected a warm reception for the message they delivered to their American counterparts in Honolulu last week. With a huge trade deficit looming and the harsh criticism of American workers by some Japanese leaders still ringing in their ears, members of the San Jose-based Semiconductor Industry Assn.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The consumer electronics industry, hungry for major new products that might restore the double-digit growth rates of the early 1980s, will get only an unsatisfying nibble of the future at its semiannual trade show, which begins Thursday in Las Vegas. Two of the most exciting new products to be shown at the Consumer Electronics Show--a new type of cassette tape player from Philips and a new model of the Nintendo video game system--will only be demonstrated at the show, not formally introduced.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1999 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The consumer electronics industry's ongoing transition from analog to digital design is far from simple. But convincing consumers that products such as DVD and digital TV not only offer better quality but are easy to use may be the most difficult challenge facing the $76-billion U.S. industry in 1999. "Digitization leads to a complicated set of choices for consumers," Howard Stringer, chairman and chief executive of Sony Corp.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Newton, the apple and gravity, fruit once again has played a big role in a scientific discovery. But instead of getting bopped like Sir Isaac on the noggin, Ray Turner reached into his refrigerator for a lemon and came away with a startling solution to one of the more daunting environmental problems facing mankind. After a few false starts one evening at his La Habra home, the longtime Hughes Aircraft Co.
NEWS
April 6, 1995 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Customs Service agents raided spy equipment stores from Southern California to the East Coast on Wednesday, ending a 17-month undercover investigation into alleged smuggling of telephone bugging devices and other electronic surveillance equipment. Nine arrests have been made and more are expected, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1997
Firefighters quickly extinguished a smoldering blaze in a Mar Vista electronics plant early Monday and worked to ensure that hazardous runoff did not contaminate the area, city fire officials said. The meltdown of a tank of chemicals at Teledyne Microelectronics in the 12000 block of Panama Street probably started because a heating element failed to shut off automatically, said Los Angeles City Fire Department spokesman Bob Collis.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1990 | SUSAN MORAN, REUTERS
As leading electronics companies race to develop high-definition television, some predict that the technology will become far more than a means for affluent TV addicts to enjoy clearer pictures and better sound quality. When combined with advanced microchips, HDTV may allow the creation of hybrid television-computers that allow users to control images by touching the screen or tapping a keyboard.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1991 | From Associated Press
Worried about the disappearing ozone, Intel Corp. is the first company to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons from its computer manufacturing lines worldwide and hopes to be the first to cut all CFC use within a year. The $4-billion Intel, which makes the most popular microprocessor "brains" of personal computers, planned to announce the news on Monday after stepping up its efforts two years ago to become CFC-free.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sanford L. Kane was flush with success last June when he publicly unveiled plans for U.S. Memories, a semiconductor manufacturing cooperative that he would lead. After all, the venture--designed to provide a domestic source of key computer memory chips--was backed by a veritable "Who's Who" of American high-technology companies, and it promised to solve one of the industry's most vexing problems: Japanese domination of the memory chip market. Then reality set in.
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