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Electronics Industry

NEWS
April 6, 1995 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Customs Service agents raided spy equipment stores from Southern California to the East Coast on Wednesday, ending a 17-month undercover investigation into alleged smuggling of telephone bugging devices and other electronic surveillance equipment. Nine arrests have been made and more are expected, officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1997
Firefighters quickly extinguished a smoldering blaze in a Mar Vista electronics plant early Monday and worked to ensure that hazardous runoff did not contaminate the area, city fire officials said. The meltdown of a tank of chemicals at Teledyne Microelectronics in the 12000 block of Panama Street probably started because a heating element failed to shut off automatically, said Los Angeles City Fire Department spokesman Bob Collis.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1990 | SUSAN MORAN, REUTERS
As leading electronics companies race to develop high-definition television, some predict that the technology will become far more than a means for affluent TV addicts to enjoy clearer pictures and better sound quality. When combined with advanced microchips, HDTV may allow the creation of hybrid television-computers that allow users to control images by touching the screen or tapping a keyboard.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1991 | From Associated Press
Worried about the disappearing ozone, Intel Corp. is the first company to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons from its computer manufacturing lines worldwide and hopes to be the first to cut all CFC use within a year. The $4-billion Intel, which makes the most popular microprocessor "brains" of personal computers, planned to announce the news on Monday after stepping up its efforts two years ago to become CFC-free.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sanford L. Kane was flush with success last June when he publicly unveiled plans for U.S. Memories, a semiconductor manufacturing cooperative that he would lead. After all, the venture--designed to provide a domestic source of key computer memory chips--was backed by a veritable "Who's Who" of American high-technology companies, and it promised to solve one of the industry's most vexing problems: Japanese domination of the memory chip market. Then reality set in.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced Wednesday that it is launching a special pilot inspection program to evaluate job safety protection programs in California's semiconductor manufacturing industry. OSHA spokesman Joe Kirkbride said such a pilot inspection program is "unique in the nation."
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Business leaders, scientists and environmentalists Wednesday gave Hughes Aircraft Co. favorable reviews for its new non-toxic, citrus formula that replaces ozone-damaging chemicals widely used in the defense electronics industry. Hughes plans to formally unveil its new substitute for chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, at news conferences today in Los Angeles and Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1989 | JUDY BERLFEIN, Berlfein is a free-lance writer in Encinitas
Drink some cool milk for breakfast, take off for work and blast the air conditioner, type away at your computer and then take a quick break for a hamburger at the local fast food joint. Come home and take a nap on the soft cushioned couch. Chances are you weren't aware, but each of those actions couldn't have happened without one essential class of chemicals. And those chemicals are endangering the health of the planet.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1989 | EVELYN RICHARDS, The Washington Post
Scott H. Holmberg, working alone in a glistening two-story building in a neatly groomed industrial park, is immersed in reminders of a failed past. Millions of dollars worth of precision manufacturing equipment sits idle. Snow-white employee smocks hang untouched. A "Help Wanted" sign lies in a corner. Yet it is in the midst of this misfortune that the Defense Department has spotted hope for America's future. In its determination to jump-start a U.S. consumer electronics industry, the Pentagon has looked cross-country to help rescue Holmberg's Alphasil Inc., a once-hopeful company now just a blink away from death.
NEWS
May 12, 1992 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The place looks like a giant integrated circuit. It functions as a miniaturized model of Japan's mighty electronics industry. It's called Akihabara, Tokyo's tiny, teeming electronics district, and an international mecca for gadget lovers, computer buffs, audiophiles, techno-nerds and, probably, spies. More than 400 stores--some the size of a tatami mat--are impossibly compacted into about 700 square yards of prime Tokyo real estate.
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