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ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1987
I have a few hundred comments on Ruth Reichl's article on the death of fine dining in Los Angeles ("Dinosaur Under Glass," Jan. 4). First and foremost, elegant dining is not endangered in L.A. We never had it. To be fair, very few cities have it; perhaps two or three places in Paris, one or two in New York. The problem is in one's definition of elegant. For me, at $125 or more per head, "elegant has to be perfect." That precludes an owner at Le Dome saying "Don't ruin my evening" to a client seeking the seat he requested.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
With the YA swoon of "Twilight" safely in the rearview mirror, movie vampires get their mojo back in the sensuous dreamscape of "Only Lovers Left Alive," one of the strongest films yet from Jim Jarmusch. A filmmaker with a deep affection for outsiders, Jarmusch sets his ode to the urbane undead - and margin-dwelling artists - in two ultra-poetic cities: Detroit, a vision of trampled grandeur on the cusp of rebirth, and worldly Tangier, its alleyways alive with the murmur of illicit doings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1993
With the passing of Audrey Hepburn come all of the natural superlatives: beautiful, elegant, chic, graceful. It must be noted too that with such attributes came also sheer, unadulterated talent. A classic example can clearly be seen in the opening sequence of "Breakfast at Tiffany's." Without dialogue, to the strains of "Moon River," Hepburn, draped in a Givenchy gown, steps out of a cab, stands before Tiffany's, peers into the glass and moves from window to window, blithely tilting her head from side to side as she balances a Danish on a paper cup. As the credits fade over, Hepburn tells us nearly everything about Holly Golightly.
HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
The big guy in the water pitcher-filter market has practically become a common name, like Kleenex. But even Brita's most ardent fans might agree that those plastic containers aren't dinner party elegant. There's a new player hoping to fill that spot: Soma, a glass carafe with a plastic filter that sits inside it. The filter, which lasts two months, is biodegradable, made of coconut shell, silk and food-based plastic, the company says. It costs $49 with one filter; additional filters, automatically mailed to subscribers, cost $12.99.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2007
MOVIE critic Kenneth Turan has lost all credibility as a journalist in his review of "Zoo" when he says, "But remarkably, an elegant, eerily lyrical film has resulted" [" 'Zoo' Is Not Just 'Eeew,' " Jan. 22]. Sorry, Mr. Turan, there can be nothing elegant about any film that discusses (and by extension grants approval of) sexual contact between humans and animals. This is a disgusting and horrific concept. Is there anything left that our society will reject as being simply wrong?
MAGAZINE
July 1, 1990
How Reichl could purport to present the top 40 restaurants in Los Angeles and leave off the best of them all--Le Chardonnay--is beyond me. Le Chardonnay has everything Reichl was looking for in abundance--two charming and watchful owners, outstanding food at reasonable prices, excellent service and elegant ambience. ANNE NELSON Los Angeles
TRAVEL
June 28, 1998
I very much enjoyed your article "Flanders' Seaside Surprise" (April 26). But rather than Knokke-Heist--too crowded--I'd suggest Knokke-Le Zout, with its wonderful bird sanctuary and elegant coast. SONJA H. STERN San Diego
NEWS
March 18, 1990
Re: "James Tarantino Makes Dressing Simply Elegant" (March 11). Elegant? "Clean, simple and pure?" Well, they are as simple as a flour sack with a hole slipped over the head. And people will pay hundreds of dollars for a back and front that I would whip together in an hour? Sack-cloth with buttons? I used to model, and I would not be caught dead in one of these. Methinks the Emperor had no clothes. I have been all over the world, and many countries have clothes that are more graceful, more colorful and (made of)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1998
Thanks a mil for the article on Kitty Carlisle Hart ("To the Manner Born," by Patrick Pacheco, Aug. 30). I've been enjoying the reruns of "To Tell the Truth," for which she was a longtime panelist, this past year on the Game Show Network and had been wondering how she is doing. It's great to know she's doing just fine and has remained active in her golden years. She looks just as elegant and lovely as ever. RONALD GARCIA Burbank
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2008
RE the review of "10,000 BC" ["Way Out of the Past," March 7]: I was glad to see that even Kenneth Turan is willing to give credit (up to a point) to a film with no other agenda than to amaze and excite and thrill and simply provide a fun time at the neighborhood movie theater. Some movies are elegant works of art. Others are galvanizing depictions of the human drama. Still others skillfully toy with our perceptions -- of reality, of time, of truth. And some are simply fun. I remember when my father would ask my 12-year-old self if I wanted to go to a movie, he never once said, "C'mon, it'll be edifying."
IMAGE
February 28, 2014 | Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
It wasn't Windansea Beach itself but a detour taken while trying to find a parking spot there that led to the mother lode of inspiration for Jonathan Cohen's spring collection. The 28-year-old designer, who grew up near the fabled beach in La Jolla and is now based in New York, had recently reread "The Pump House Gang," Tom Wolfe's 1968 story about rowdy teens who hung out at the pump house at Windansea, defending their sandy turf from the over-25 set. When he was home last March, Cohen was determined to see the place with fresh eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Venezuela's state-supported music education marvel, El Sistema, offering free instruction to nearly 600,000 young people in all corners of the country, is not without controversy. With an increasingly restive Venezuelan public protesting human rights violations and economic dysfunction, El Sistema, an agency in the executive branch of the government, cannot escape its association with the administration of President Nicolàs Maduro. But those who argue that El Sistema has always been a program above politics and an example of positive social action that is catching on around the world had powerful evidence with the exceptional Los Angeles debut Wednesday night of the Bahia Orchestra Project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | Sandy Banks
Sixty years ago, the Wilfandel House in the West Adams district was a hub of high society for black Los Angeles. Back then, Negroes couldn't book rooms in posh hotels or upscale party venues. So the wives of dozens of successful black men formed a club and purchased a home in what then was one of the city's wealthiest neighborhoods. "Everybody who was anybody who lived in L.A. or came through town was entertained at the Wilfandel," recalled Heilindia Brown, a former club president.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
SOCHI, Russia - There were human doves twirling to Tchaikovsky, ballerinas waltzing with Tolstoy, and a prolonged roar for a Russian team wearing the coolest of fur-lined coats. On a chilly night along the shores of the Black Sea, Russia welcomed the world to the Sochi Olympics on Friday with a giant embrace that was equal parts elegant, awkward and Putin. The three-hour opening ceremony at Fisht Olympic Stadium highlighted the beauty of the Russian culture and strength of the Russian spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Wendy Smith
Admirers of Penelope Lively's many fine novels will find the same lucid intelligence at work in her elegantly written "view from old age," which she dubs "not quite a memoir. " The British writer, who turned 80 in 2013, meditates on several subjects that have preoccupied her fiction (memory, history, social change) and some more suitable to nonfiction: books that have shaped her life, a few particulars of that life, and six objects - including the eponymous dancing fish and ammonites - that reveal something important about their owner.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
If you've ever said to yourself after being wowed by an actor of Christopher Plummer's caliber, "They sure don't make 'em like that anymore," then you won't want to miss Plummer's one-man show, "A Word or Two," at the Ahmanson Theatre. He more or less explains why. This 80-minute star vehicle, directed with elegant finesse by Des McAnuff, is less an autobiographical tour of an illustrious thespian's career than an anatomy of a sensibility. It is a love letter to reading and the written word, the building blocks of a classical actor's talent.
FOOD
July 27, 2005 | Susan LaTempa
In the French town of Cognac, where brandy is king, the last vessel connoisseurs would deign to raise to their lips is a snifter -- the large surface area volatizes the alcohol too much, and that's pretty much all you smell. Cognac and other fine brandies are more properly sipped from small glasses with rounded bowls and slightly narrowed "chimneys" that focus the aromas. These 7-inch tulip-shaped Riedel glasses are from the company's Vinum line of mid-priced stemware. They're elegant enough for company, but not too fragile for everyday use. Riedel Vinum Cognac-Hennessy machine-made glasses.
TRAVEL
February 9, 2003
I was at first delighted to see "Now Santiago Comes Into Focus" (Jan. 19) about Chile, the country of my birth. However, it was written by someone who was a casual observer at best. It was superficial, lacked homework and had a few misleading and derogatory nuances. Although Chile has been shaped mostly by those of Spanish ancestry, only a transient traveler can omit a mention of the country's large mestizo population and the German, British, French and Irish populations, which have jealously preserved their cultures there.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
A red-brick driveway leads to this Paul Revere Williams-designed Tudor set along the water of Toluca Lake. The elegant formal entry and the library, with its wood-beam ceiling and built-in bookcases, are in keeping with the architect's traditional style. Location: 9956 Toluca Lake Ave., Toluca Lake 91602 Asking price: $8 million Year built: 1938 House size: Five bedrooms, six bathrooms, 7,228 square feet Lot size: 1.02 acres Features: Dark wood flooring, recessed lighting, leaded windows, intricate molding, curved staircase, bar, wine cellar, covered patio, outdoor fireplace, gazebo, swimming pool, private dock About the area: In the first half of 2013, 84 single-family homes sold in the 91602 ZIP Code at a median price of $842,000, according to DataQuick.
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