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Elegy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2009 | Thomas Curwen
The lake is deserted, and the forest is quiet at the far end of Huntington Lodge Road. A breeze combs through the pines and the firs. It strips a ready leaf or two from the willows that grow by the water. Fall has come to the Sierra Nevada, this third weekend in October, and the cabins on the cul-de-sac are vacant. Most are boarded up for winter, cenotaphs to a time just weeks ago when they were open and alive to the coming and going of vacationing families. Summer is a short season in the mountains -- over, some say, before it begins -- and for the owners of these cabins, a small resort known as Lakeview Cottages, the clock is running down.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Bob Hicok is one of my favorite poets. Partly, it's the movement of his lines, which are both conversational and utterly unexpected, almost as if he (or we) are joining a conversation that extends beyond the framework of the poem. “My heart is cold,” he writes in “Pilgrimage,” the opening effort in his new collection “Elegy Owed” (Copper Canyon: 112 pp., $22), “it should wear a mitten. My heart / is whatever temperature a heart is / in a man who doesn't believe in heaven.” And then there's that: his unrelenting vision , a sense of the world as both utterly real and utterly elusive, and heartbreaking because we have to die. Death is at the center of Hicok's writing - not in a maudlin, self-pitying way, but rather as a vivid presence, infusing everything, even the deepest moments of connection, with a steely sense of loss.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
The Guardians: An Elegy Sarah Manguso Farrar, Straus and Giroux: 128 pp., $20 For more than a year, I've been on a reader's grief patrol. Memoir about a mother dying of cancer? Story of a husband's stroke? Taking care of a declining relative on a remote barren coast? Yes, yes, yes, all those and more. I try to swear them off, but I'm still drawn to these books. They are to me a form of secular reckoning; the faithful have their way of facing the big questions of life and death and sorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
The Guardians: An Elegy Sarah Manguso Farrar, Straus and Giroux: 128 pp., $20 For more than a year, I've been on a reader's grief patrol. Memoir about a mother dying of cancer? Story of a husband's stroke? Taking care of a declining relative on a remote barren coast? Yes, yes, yes, all those and more. I try to swear them off, but I'm still drawn to these books. They are to me a form of secular reckoning; the faithful have their way of facing the big questions of life and death and sorrow.
MAGAZINE
January 2, 1994
I enjoyed Ann Japenga's "Grunge 'R' Us" (Nov. 14) immensely, and thank her for her attempt to understand. But she needn't have written an elegy. The counterculture is not dead, it's just harder to see. And that is cool. SARA AVAKIAN Van Nuys
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989 | Steve Hochman
Wouldn't it be wild if quirky alternative rockers like Pere Ubu and the Swans (each now on major labels) turned out to be in 1989 what sensitive folkie types were in 1988? If that happens, the Pixies' second album should reach the top of the charts. Unlikely. But, if it did, it would probably start with the Boston quartet's song "Here Comes Your Man," a sweet 'n' summery cross of the Tremeloes' '67 pop hit "Here Comes My Baby," Them's "Here Comes the Night" and the Velvet Underground's "Waiting for the Man."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2009 | David C. Nichols
As the Digital Age layers on paradigm shifts, there is bittersweet pleasure in reflecting on what has passed, as in "The Dining Room." A.R. Gurney's 1981 episodic look at declining WASP culture isn't exactly deep-dish, yet its delicate mixture of elegy and mirth remains captivating. "The Dining Room" was Gurney's breakthrough play, a Pulitzer finalist that presaged his subsequent upper-middle-class studies. The narrative depicts various 20th century families and servants in vignettes that overlap in an iconic dining room (well rendered by designer Vandy Scoates)
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | ERLA ZWINGLE, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Venice. A human tide is washing over the resplendent city that owes its grandeur to the sea. Ten million visitors a year arrive to marvel at the remains of its astonishing 1,500 years of glory, the architecture and paintings. They are seduced by the dreamlike allure of a place that seems to exist somehow apart from real life--a kind of baroque elegy adrift in its lagoon, floating in mist and shadow, entranced by the ceaseless murmur of the water as it never tires of kissing the stones.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1986 | KENNETH HERMAN
In the movies, space travel is invariably accompanied by a sound track of suitably evocative music. For many, the opening theme of the Richard Strauss tone poem used in the 1968 film "2001: A Space Odyssey" has become a leitmotif symbolizing space travel. In reality, however, science and space technology apparently have no need of the Muses. San Diego State University composer David Ward-Steinman would like to change all that.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1995 | PHILIP BRANDES
Title notwithstanding, the earnest and sometimes poignant "Elegies for Angels, Punks and Raging Queens" at Hollywood's Attic Theatre pays tribute to more than just fringe populations affected by the AIDS epidemic. Inspired by the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, Bill Russell's serious-minded musical cycles through 30 verse monologues celebrating the struggles of people from all walks of life who fought losing battles with HIV infection.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010
Elegy for April A novel Benjamin Black Henry Holt: 304 pp., $25
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | By BETSY SHARKEY, Film Critic
Mia is 15, all elbows and anger, going at her life in a rundown apartment complex in Essex as if it were one long skirmish in British filmmaker Andrea Arnold's exceptionally well-crafted drama, "Fish Tank." The film features newcomer Katie Jarvis, whom the director first spotted fighting with her boyfriend on a train station platform. The 17-year-old so completely captures the innocence, cynicism and rage of a child of poverty and divorce on the edge of adulthood that it feels as if you are spying on Mia, so achingly real, so tangible does her world seem here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2009 | Thomas Curwen
The lake is deserted, and the forest is quiet at the far end of Huntington Lodge Road. A breeze combs through the pines and the firs. It strips a ready leaf or two from the willows that grow by the water. Fall has come to the Sierra Nevada, this third weekend in October, and the cabins on the cul-de-sac are vacant. Most are boarded up for winter, cenotaphs to a time just weeks ago when they were open and alive to the coming and going of vacationing families. Summer is a short season in the mountains -- over, some say, before it begins -- and for the owners of these cabins, a small resort known as Lakeview Cottages, the clock is running down.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | Noel Murray
Twilight Summit, $32.99; Blu-ray, $34.95 Stephenie Meyer has banked a fortune with her series of young adult novels about a lovelorn teenager and the supernatural creatures who pine for her. The first volume, "Twilight," became a smash-hit movie last year, making stars out of Robert Pattinson (playing a moody vampire) and Kristen Stewart (as the mortal high school girl he loves and protects).
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
"Blessed Is the Match" is not only the title of a solemn, respectful documentary about Israeli Holocaust martyr Hannah Senesh, it is also the opening of the poem that helped make her famous. "Blessed is the match, consumed in kindling flame" is the first line of that brief poem, a tribute to self-sacrifice written by Senesh in 1944, just days before she was captured in Nazi-held Hungary.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2009 | David C. Nichols
As the Digital Age layers on paradigm shifts, there is bittersweet pleasure in reflecting on what has passed, as in "The Dining Room." A.R. Gurney's 1981 episodic look at declining WASP culture isn't exactly deep-dish, yet its delicate mixture of elegy and mirth remains captivating. "The Dining Room" was Gurney's breakthrough play, a Pulitzer finalist that presaged his subsequent upper-middle-class studies. The narrative depicts various 20th century families and servants in vignettes that overlap in an iconic dining room (well rendered by designer Vandy Scoates)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010
Elegy for April A novel Benjamin Black Henry Holt: 304 pp., $25
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2008 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
Based on the recent novel "The Dying Animal" by Philip Roth, "Elegy" charts the doomed-to-fail love affair between older man David Kepesh (Ben Kingsley) and younger woman Consuela Castillo (Penelope Cruz).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2008 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
Based on the recent novel "The Dying Animal" by Philip Roth, "Elegy" charts the doomed-to-fail love affair between older man David Kepesh (Ben Kingsley) and younger woman Consuela Castillo (Penelope Cruz).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2008 | Michael Ordona, Special to The Times
Spanish director Isabel Coixet guided Ben Kingsley and Penelope Cruz through intensely intimate scenes in the upcoming "Elegy." Kingsley and Cruz were longtime admirers of each other's work, but that was no guarantee they would find alchemy as acting partners. "People always talk about chemistry," Coixet said. "You cannot direct that. It clicks or it doesn't click. The first thing we shot was the scene where they were walking in the street, just shopping," she said by phone from Spain.
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