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Elementary Education

NEWS
May 2, 1993 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each morning, a gaggle of youngsters pours out of Kellogg Polytechnic School in Pomona and heads for an asphalt playground. Their enthusiasm might suggest recess, but the elementary school students are beginning a science lesson. They spend an hour measuring the sun's shadows, observing precipitation, jotting down the temperature and which way the wind is blowing. Returning to their classrooms, the students explain their findings using math, drawings and poetry; some do their work on computers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA
Thirteen Orange County elementary schools have been nominated for the 1992-93 California Distinguished Schools Program, the state Department of Education has announced. In addition, Newhart Elementary in the Capistrano Unified School District and Vista Verde Elementary in the Irvine Unified School District have been nominated for statewide recognition based on their performance in the 1992 Eighth Grade Assessment Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1993 | BRENDA DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Simi Valley kindergartner Sadaf Fazly made the "puh" sound of the letter P, typed it on the keyboard in front of her and did the same for I and G. A fat, pink pig trotted onto the computer screen. "I like playing it," Sadaf, 5, turned to tell a visitor. "It's fun." Every day, students like Sadaf illustrate the results of a two-year Ventura County study that showed a youngster's introduction to computers is not only a vital early link to technology but a cutting-edge teacher's aid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1993 | DEBRA CANO
Yasmeen Yassa likes snakes. Her favorite is a ball python that lives in a terrarium in her classroom. "He's the kindest snake," said Yasmeen, 6, a first-grader at Gordon H. Beatty School. "And I learned that he has a pink tongue." Inside Diana West's classroom, Yasmeen and fellow students are introduced to the world of reptiles and other animals.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | ERIN J. AUBRY
The hourlong session in the empty classroom, the first for the white-haired tutor and her young charge, is going well. Five-year-old Terry Stewart, a shy kindergartner, is enjoying listening to nursery rhymes and softly answering questions about them. But he suddenly freezes when asked to tell a story about himself. Veneo Joiner doesn't miss a beat. "What's your favorite subject, Terry?" she asks, the crisp energy and bright smile of an hour ago still intact.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | SHEARLEAN DUKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At Los Naranjos School, kids are encouraged to show off. In kindergarten class, they recite nursery rhymes in front of a video camera. In fifth grade, they write letters to everyone from their parents to the President. And in sixth grade, they become characters from early Egyptian history and appear before an audience of classmates and friends. The goal is to let children "show off" what they have learned by performing an activity that demonstrates their knowledge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1992 | HENRY CHU
A Topanga Elementary School teacher was honored Wednesday as California's best environmental education instructor by a state conservation organization. Leslie Dahlquist was named Environmental Education Teacher of the Year by the California Assn. of Resource Conservation Districts at its annual conference in Ventura. Dahlquist won the award for her extensive environmental curriculum at Topanga, where she teaches kindergarten and first grade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1992
A Topanga Elementary School teacher was honored Wednesday as California's best environmental education instructor by a state conservation organization. Leslie Dahlquist was named Environmental Education Teacher of the Year by the California Assn. of Resource Conservation Districts at an annual conference in Ventura. Dahlquist won the award for her extensive environmental curriculum at Topanga, where she teaches kindergarten and first grade.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | SHEARLEAN DUKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Every morning nearly 100 children voluntarily go to class early at Rio Vista Elementary School. And every afternoon, another 50 pupils stay after class. Given the option, pupils at Rio Vista have proved that they'll get up early and stay late as long as they can keep on learning. Last year, 723 children took part in Rio Vista's "before-and-after" school project. "This year we expect even more," says Robert McLeish, the teacher in charge of the federally funded program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1992 | MAYERENE BARKER
Cal State Northridge's biology department has received a state grant of $140,000 for the third year of a project aimed at encouraging minority schoolchildren to choose careers in science. The project, Elementary Science Leaders, trains selected teachers to instruct colleagues on how to improve science education, said Steven Oppenheimer, CSUN biology professor and the project's director.
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