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Elementary School Students

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1996 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
A book bag is a simple thing, but until he got one Thursday, 10-year-old Eric Ruiz often felt left out and different at school. "Everybody had a backpack and I didn't," he said. Not anymore. Eric was one of 100 fifth-graders at Bassett Street Elementary School who received free personalized book bags Thursday from the Assistance League of the San Fernando Valley. Inside the black book bags, each of the students found a notebook, a glue stick, a ruler, folders, pens and pencils.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Warning that elementary school truancy in California has reached a crisis level, state Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris and lawmakers on Monday proposed a package of bills aimed at improving the tracking of absenteeism and the evaluation and use of measures to keep kids in school. Harris estimated that 1 million elementary school students are truant each year and 250,000 of them miss 18 or more school days costing school districts $1.4 billion. In all, 30% of elementary school students were truant during the 2012-2013 school year, she said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
First there was the Boy Scouts' "Respect Copyrights" activity patch, backed by the Motion Picture Assn. of America. Then there was "Crime-Fighting Canines," a weekly anti-piracy comic strip series for children in which two black Labrador retrievers named Lucky and Flo sniffed out bootleg DVDs. The series was part of a school education campaign led by the MPAA. Now that group, along with the Recording Industry Assn. of America and the nation's main Internet service providers, is quietly backing another controversial push to educate schoolchildren about the evils of piracy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Warning that truancy has reached a crisis level in California elementary schools, state Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris and half a dozen lawmakers proposed a raft of bills Monday aimed at keeping kids in school. Harris said 30% of elementary school students were truant in the 2012-13 school year. "California's Constitution guarantees our children the right to an education, yet our elementary schools face a truancy crisis," Harris said. "When children in kindergarten through sixth grade miss school, they fall behind and too many never catch up. " A child is considered truant after missing school or being tardy by more than 30 minutes without a valid excuse on three occasions during a school year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1997
Twelve teams of elementary students from Lakewood, Long Beach and Norwalk today will unleash their creativity by developing 3-D maps of their neighborhoods. Using materials such as milk cartons, juice boxes, paper towel cylinders and shoe boxes, more than 100 students will make miniature buildings and landmarks for the police station, library, post office and school. The Neighborhood Knowledge Map-Making Olympics will be held in the Lakewood High School Gymnasium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1992 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Walter Koenig will probably be known the rest of his life for his portrayal of Ensign Chekov on the original "Star Trek" series. On Thursday, he swapped his trademark Russian accent for an Italian one and replaced Capt. Kirk with Capt. Christopher Columbus in a humorous vignette that retraced the explorer's voyage but had him land in the strange new world of modern-day Miami Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1997 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Of the 50 elementary school students who went on a recent field trip to the Skylight Bookstore in Los Feliz Village, 49 sat enthralled on the floor as former actress Enid Kent Sperber read a story about a dog with horrible breath. But, the 50th, David Tevanyan, 10, was bored. He fidgeted with his tennis shoes. He shuffled a book marker and a postcard. While other students laughed or listened to the story with their mouths open in wonder, David stared down at the floor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1993 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few minutes after noon on a recent school day, Viejo Elementary School sixth grader Danielle Fernandez became an on-the-air radio personality. In a firm and clear voice, Fernandez told thousands tuned to 88.5 FM, Saddleback College public radio, about the day's weather. And although Fernandez had never before been on radio, none in the listening audience was surprised when she came on the air. There's a new weathercaster from Viejo every school day on KSBR 88.5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1996 | DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mood in the room is serene as a young hostess greets her guest with a traditional Japanese bow, her hands clasped demurely in front of her. To show his respect, the guest bends forward in a deep bow, removes his shoes in customary Japanese style and is ushered in for a cup of tea. Such scenes are typical in Japan, but this particular home visit took place last week at Concordia Elementary School with a group of giggling fifth-graders wearing sneakers and T-shirts.
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jesse Odatey is not the first person to illustrate the interior of a nuclear reactor, and his knowledge of uranium is occasionally sketchy. But Hawthorne School District officials might want to keep a close eye on the test tubes Odatey handles in science class. After all, if a 10-year-old can describe how nuclear power is generated, there's no telling what kind of mischief he could do with a few stray chemicals.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Most students are exposed in school to efforts by food and beverage companies to sell food or gain brand loyalty, despite a decline in some kinds of commercial enterprises, including in soda machine contracts, researchers reported Monday. High school students get the most exposure, and for almost 64% of elementary school students, the most common type of commercialism is food coupons distributed as incentives, the researchers wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Pediatrics.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
First there was the Boy Scouts' "Respect Copyrights" activity patch, backed by the Motion Picture Assn. of America. Then there was "Crime-Fighting Canines," a weekly anti-piracy comic strip series for children in which two black Labrador retrievers named Lucky and Flo sniffed out bootleg DVDs. The series was part of a school education campaign led by the MPAA. Now that group, along with the Recording Industry Assn. of America and the nation's main Internet service providers, is quietly backing another controversial push to educate schoolchildren about the evils of piracy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2012 | By Matt Stevens, Los Angeles Times
When Marcus Tyson visited his new campus days before his senior year was set to begin, he stood in a nearly empty parking lot and declared that the trailer before him looked "like prison. " By Tuesday, the first day of school, mounds of dirt and workbenches had disappeared, but the white-and-green portable classroom remained. "Still pretty awful," said Marcus, 17. Culver Park Continuation High School, now stuck in the back of a parking lot between the district's adult and middle schools, began classes this week with about 50 students in a single portable unit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Who knew that blindfolding students was part of the curriculum in the Los Angeles Unified School District? It was, until last week, when a senior district official nixed a lesson in a new fourth-grade reading program. The blindfolding of students attracted notice after the January arrest of Miramonte Elementary teacher Mark Berndt, who has pleaded not guilty to 23 counts of lewd conduct for allegedly photographing students blindfolded and being spoon-fed his semen. In light of that case, blindfolding "may be perceived negatively," wrote Deputy Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2010 | By Jason Song, Jason Felch and Doug Smith, Los Angeles Times
Five families from across the San Fernando Valley set up camp for three nights by the front door of Wilbur Avenue Elementary School in 2009, intent on getting a spot for their children in one of the best-regarded schools in Los Angeles. Others hired someone to hold their place in line. This spring, the school in affluent Tarzana began using a lottery for applicants from outside the neighborhood. Within hours, more than a dozen children were on the list. What these determined families could not have known is that Wilbur's record was among the worst in Los Angeles for boosting student performance in math and English.
SPORTS
February 20, 2009 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, ON HIGH SCHOOLS
At La Pluma Elementary School in La Mirada, Larry Kaupang enjoys the reaction of his fifth-grade students when they get to dissect frogs. "Some of them are squeamish, but most are excited," he said. By afternoon, Kaupang switches to serious mode, arriving at nearby La Mirada High, where he's the head coach for the 25-3 boys' basketball team. "Somebody passes gas in practice and they're laughing, and I mention that's something my fifth-graders would do," he said.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | JESSICA GOODHEART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alberto Carrillo was noticeably nervous before a recent public reading of his first published work. "I thought that they were going to laugh at me," he said. But his tale--"Los Animales," a seven-sentence story about a group of cows, turkeys and horses that blocked traffic one day--was well-received by the crowd of 20 parents and teachers, and Alberto turned to autographing books in the slow, deliberate script of an 8-year-old.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | HOWARD BLUME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before the first American soldiers died in Persian Gulf fighting, casualties of the conflict were spreading throughout the San Gabriel Valley: about 20 pupils at Killian Elementary School in Rowland Heights, about 50 at La Seda Elementary in La Puente and more than 60 at Ralph Waldo Emerson Junior High in Pomona. For these children, war left the realm of GI Joe, plastic guns and Tonka toys to become aunt and uncle, brother and friend, mom and dad.
HEALTH
May 14, 2007 | Sally Squires, Special to The Times
You know how hard it can be to say no. But our tendency to accept what we're offered may have positive value when it comes to encouraging children to choose -- and eat -- healthier food at school. A new report suggests that there's a simple, low-cost approach: Just offer it to them. That's the conclusion of a pilot program in Guilford, Conn., where school cafeteria servers were trained to ask elementary school students, "Would you like fruit or juice with your lunch?"
NATIONAL
April 6, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A substitute teacher's alleged tool for shushing kindergartners -- clothespins -- doesn't wash with school officials. Four boys said clothespins were placed on their lips for talking in class, Amanda-Clearcreek Primary School Principal Mike Johnsen wrote in a letter to parents. He said the substitute, Ruth Ann Stoneburner, would no longer work at the school.
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