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Elements

NEWS
January 1, 1995 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Every hamburger and Volkswagen, every newborn child and billion-year-old planet, is fashioned from the same elementary ingredients. The difference is only: how much, how many, in what combination? Chemists are constantly trying to understand the architecture of atoms, seeking to discover, or even create, new elements. So far they have come up with 19 beyond the 92 elements that occur in nature.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Scientists at a German research institute have added a new element to the periodic table--No. 112, a heavier, still unnamed relative of zinc, cadmium and mercury. A team of German, Russian, Slovakian and Finnish physicists detected a single atom of the new metal Feb. 9, the Society for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt, near Frankfurt, announced Wednesday. They made it by bombarding lead, element No. 82, with zinc, element No. 30, until a pair of atoms fused to form the new element.
NEWS
October 12, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chemist Glenn T. Seaborg of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will not have a new element named for him after all--because the Nobel laureate is still alive. No element has ever been named after a living person, but earlier this year the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory team that created element 106 a quarter-century ago proposed that it be named seaborgium in honor of the discoverer of plutonium and former chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2009
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2009 | By KENNETH TURAN, Film Critic
By turns warmly sentimental, serial-killer sinister and science-fiction fantastical, "The Lovely Bones" was an unlikely book to achieve worldwide success. In the film version, those mismatched elements come back to haunt the story, so to speak, making the final product more hit-and-miss than unblemished triumph. It wasn't only the bestselling nature of Alice Sebold's novel that made "Bones" one of the most anticipated films of the year. It was the participation of director Peter Jackson and his regular screenwriting collaborators Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens, the team that had a considerable triumph with the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1995
Wondering about the atomic weight of gold? Set your computer to the WebElements, an automated periodic table of the elements at http://www.cchem.berkeley.edu/Table/index.html, which contains a searchable database of the first 109 elements.
MAGAZINE
October 11, 1987
I would like to take issue with Robert Lawrence Balzer and his panel of beer tasters ("The Times' End-of-Summer Beer Tasting," Sept. 6). I cannot understand how they can make an honest evaluation of beers produced at different times and stored under dubious conditions. Unlike some wines, beers do not improve with age. The elements of temperature, time and storing conditions affect the quality of all brewed products. Beer is very perishable and begins to deteriorate the day after it is brewed.
OPINION
November 20, 2012
Re “ Bullet train leg to finish later ,” Nov. 16 It has been my experience that high-speed rail has brought untold benefits wherever it has been developed. The early decision to solve Japan's transportation needs with bullet trains had many side benefits, including the development of both industrial and commercial centers that were and are major supporting elements to the success of the system. The same can be said for the TGV in France. Jobs, growth and more freedom of movement are but a few of the positive elements from this long-overdue project.
OPINION
April 5, 2013
Re "Tall order for Watts Towers," April 1 Simon Rodia was a great artist and dreamer who built the wonderfully decorated Watts Towers all by himself. Unfortunately, they are made of relatively flexible steel and rigid and brittle concrete, mortar and tile. The towers will move and deflect as they respond to the weather and earthquake forces, and in so doing, the rigid elements of the cladding will break, unable to physically flex with the steel's movements. Engineers have always struggled with the balance of strength and stiffness.
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