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Elena Kagan

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NATIONAL
May 11, 2010
Elena Kagan Age: 50 Born: April 28, 1960 Birthplace: New York City Hunter College High School; graduated 1977 Bachelor's degree in history from Princeton University; graduated 1981 Master of philosophy degree from Oxford in 1983 Harvard Law School; graduated 1986 Experience: Clerk for U.S. Circuit Court Judge Abner Mikva: 1986 Clerk for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall: 1987 Professor, University...
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OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Given the danger posed by drunk or reckless drivers, police should follow up on information - even information from an anonymous source - that a vehicle might be careening down a street or threatening other motorists and pedestrians. If they confirm that is the case, they should stop the vehicle. But that isn't what happened in a California case decided by the Supreme Court last week. The court's ruling makes it too easy for police to stop motorists on the basis of an anonymous tip. In 2008, a 911 dispatch team in Mendocino County received a report that a pickup truck had forced another vehicle off the road, giving rise to a concern that the driver might be drunk.
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NATIONAL
June 28, 2010 | Office of the Press Secretary, White House
"Mr. Chairman, the law school I had the good fortune to lead has a kind of motto, spoken each year at graduation. We tell the new graduates that they are ready to enter a profession devoted to "those wise restraints that make us free."
NATIONAL
March 25, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court's conservative justices sharply criticized part of President Obama's healthcare law Tuesday, suggesting they will rule later this year that requiring Christian-owned corporations to offer their employees contraceptives coverage violates the freedom of religion. “Your reasoning would permit requiring profit-making corporations to pay for abortions,” Justice Anthony M. Kennedy told U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli, who defended the contraceptives provision of the Affordable Care Act. The administration's lawyer warned that the court would be adopting a “dangerous principle” if it gave employers a right to exempt themselves from federal laws based on their religious beliefs.
OPINION
August 10, 2010
A question of pay Re "L.A. posts city employee salaries," Aug. 7 Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa makes only $232,425 a year. That's dwarfed by salaries of over $300,000 for the police chief, and the general managers of the airports and the harbor. Even the city administrative officer earns more. No wonder Villaraigosa needs freebies from the Lakers and Dodgers. At his low salary, it's a matter of survival — or becoming a couch potato, watching the teams on TV. Seriously, while Bell gave salaries beyond imagination, L.A.'s salaries aren't so far behind.
OPINION
July 2, 2010
Racing to danger Re "A grim reminder of danger," June 29 Five CHP patrolmen have died in the line of duty in recent weeks. Perhaps we are reaping the fruit of tolerating drivers who shrink safety margins by flagrantly speeding, driving aggressively and distracting themselves with electronic accessories, especially here in Southern California. Driving I-5 over the Grapevine toward L.A.
NATIONAL
August 8, 2010 | By Janet Hook, Los Angeles Times
Elena Kagan was sworn in as the 112th justice of the Supreme Court on Saturday, opening the first era in U.S. history with three women serving on the nation's premier judicial bench. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. administered the oath at the Supreme Court just two days after the Senate's 63-37 vote Thursday to confirm her nomination and one day after President Obama hosted a White House reception in Kagan's honor. She is not expected to dramatically change the ideological balance of the court because she replaces retired Justice John Paul Stevens, a fellow liberal jurist.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2010 | By James Oliphant, Tribune Washington Bureau
Elena Kagan's elevation to the Supreme Court appeared virtually assured Wednesday, the second day of debate over her confirmation, as a majority of senators declared support for her nomination. Kagan, 50, the U.S. solicitor general, was tapped by President Obama in May to replace retired Justice John Paul Stevens. A floor vote on the nomination is likely Thursday, and Republicans are not expected to attempt a filibuster. For some senators, however, their decision may have consequences beyond confirming the nation's 112th justice.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2010 | By David G. Savage and Christi Parsons, Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama on Monday hailed his nominee to the Supreme Court, Elena Kagan, as "one of the nation's foremost legal minds," but Kagan's biggest asset in upcoming confirmation hearings may be her lack of an extensive public record, providing few openings for Republicans to attack. A year after making Kagan his administration's advocate before the Supreme Court, Obama now hopes her personal skills are good enough to craft consensus with the court's conservative majority — and to win Senate confirmation to the position in the first place.
OPINION
May 13, 2010
Kagan on the court? Re "Kagan is picked for high court," May 10 Elena Kagan, the president's nominee for the Supreme Court, has the least amount of experience of any nominee in the last three decades. Her judicial experience is zero, as is her real-world experience. President Obama appointed her as solicitor general, where she once argued that the federal government has the power to ban certain books and pamphlets. Responding to this argument for the majority of the court, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote, "As a free-floating test for 1st Amendment coverage, that idea is startling and dangerous."
BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Outside accountants and lawyers who reveal fraud and wrongdoing at publicly traded companies are protected as whistle-blowers just as employees are, the Supreme Court ruled, expanding the reach of an anti-fraud law passed in the wake of the collapse of companies such as Enron Corp. and WorldCom Inc. The 6-3 decision Tuesday will affect the mutual fund and financial services industries in particular because they rely heavily on outside contractors and advisors. Denying whistle-blower protection to all outside employees of such companies would leave a "huge hole" in the 2002 law, said Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, noting that most mutual fund companies hire independent investment advisors and contractors rather than employees.
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | By Michael McGough
On Monday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of a death row inmate in Florida that raises this question: “Whether the Florida scheme for identifying mentally retarded defendants in capital cases violates Atkins vs. Virginia .” Atkins vs. Virginia is the 2002 case in which the court held that “the mentally retarded should be categorically excluded from execution.” The issue in Monday's argument was whether Florida could...
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that police officers may enter and search a home without a warrant as long as one occupant consents, even if another resident has previously objected. The ruling -- based on a case involving a Los Angeles Police Department search -- gives the police more leeway to search homes without obtaining a warrant, even in situations where there is no emergency. The case began with a lawsuit filed by Walter Fernandez, a Los Angeles man who was arrested in 2009 as a suspect in a street robbery and taken from his home to the police station.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court cleared the way Wednesday for same-sex marriages to resume in California as the justices, in a procedural ruling, turned away the defenders of Proposition 8. Chief Justice John Roberts, speaking for the 5-4 majority, said the private sponsors of Prop. 8 did not have legal standing to appeal after the ballot measure was struck down by a federal judge in San Francisco. "We have never before upheld the standing of a private party to defend the constitutionality of a state statute when state officials have chosen not to," he said.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The police may take a DNA sample from people arrested for serious crimes, the Supreme Court ruled Monday in a major victory for law enforcement and crime victims. The 5-4 decision is likely to make the taking of DNA samples as common as taking fingerprints or a photograph when people are arrested. More than half of the states now require a DNA mouth swab when persons are charged with a serious crime, and many of the others were awaiting a Supreme Court ruling on the constitutionality of the practice.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Jon Healey
When the Supreme Court took up the question Monday of whether genes could be patented , the justices were clearly concerned about preserving innovation in medicine and biotechnology. But the issue presented by Myriad Genetics' patents on the BRCA genes cuts both ways, leading to a potential split among the justices. On the one hand, allowing patents on a gene could prevent companies from developing new tests and drugs related to that sequence until the patent expires. On the other, barring patents could deter companies from making the huge investments needed to isolate sequences and determine their role in the body.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
After more than three hours, Elena Kagan, the solicitor general of the United States, got her chance to speak directly to the panel of senators who will weigh her nomination to be the next Supreme Court justice and promised to do her best and work hard while keeping her mind open to deal with contentious issues. Kagan avoided taking any specific positions Monday on the contentious social issues on which she will likely rule, if confirmed. Nominated to become the 112th justice on the Supreme Court, she took a modest stand while promising to work impartially for justice for all. "I will make no pledges this week other than this one -- that if confirmed, I will remember and abide by all these lessons," she told the Senate Judiciary Committee.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Noam N. Levey and David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The lawyer defending California's ban on same-sex marriage drew skeptical questioning from swing justices Tuesday as the Supreme Court began two historic days of oral arguments considering the rights of gays and lesbians. Charles J. Cooper, whose clients include citizens who voted for California's 2008 Proposition 8 banning same-sex marriage, tried to convince the justices that states should have the right to limit marriage to heterosexual couples because they can produce children.
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