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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2010
The hotly anticipated new animal habitat Elephants of Asia finally opens to the public, featuring three gentle pachyderm transplants from the San Diego Zoo: Tina, Jewel and 25-year-old Billy. The six-acre exhibit features bathing pools, sandy hills and varied topography, all devoted to exploring the connection between elephants and the cultures of Thailand, India, China and Cambodia. L.A. Zoo, 5333 Zoo Drive, Griffith Park. Grand opening 10 a.m. Open daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. except Dec. 25. Adults $14, seniors $11, children 2-12 $9, children younger than 2 free.
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SCIENCE
October 10, 2013 | By Monte Morin
African elephants really get the point -- the finger point that is. At least that's the conclusion of a study published Thursday in the journal Current Biology that examined the behavior of 11 pachyderms who were pointed in the direction of hidden snacks. According to study author Richard Byrne, a professor of evolutionary psychology at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, African elephants will investigate the contents of a container 68% of the time if a human points to it. By comparison, a 12-month-old human will check out the indicated container 73% of the time.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | by Carla Hall
The Los Angeles Zoo “is not a happy place for elephants, nor is it for members of the public who go to the zoo and recognize that the elephants are neither thriving, happy, nor content,” declared L.A. Superior Court Judge John L. Segal in the decision he signed Monday ruling in favor of two local citizens and animal welfare advocates who sued the zoo, arguing it mistreats its pachyderms. “Captivity is a terrible existence for any intelligent, self-aware species, which the undisputed evidence shows elephants are. To believe otherwise, as some high-ranking zoo employees appear to believe, is delusional.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
Get up close and personal with one of the animal kingdom's weightiest - and most interesting - mammals, the elephant. A new volunteer program, sponsored by the nonprofit organization United Planet , is based at an elephant sanctuary in Jaipur, India.  It provides participants with an opportunity to learn about animal care and rescue while experiencing cultural immersion. "Working with animals is important, rewarding -- and fun," says Theresa Higgs, a United Planet vice president.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2010 | Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Ecologists have discovered the secret weapon used by certain acacia trees to defend themselves against ravenous elephants: ants. The finding could one day help conservationists protect vulnerable plants from elephants and other large herbivores, said University of Florida biologist Todd Palmer, who reported the discovery online Thursday in the journal Current Biology. Elephants can have a devastating impact on the trees of the African savannas, Palmer said. A hungry pachyderm can easily demolish a tree, wrapping its prehensile trunk around thick branches and ripping them off. A herd of them can lay waste to an area — a problem for people trying to protect wild lands or cropland.
NEWS
February 8, 1988 | Associated Press
Three wild elephants went on a rampage in southern Nepal, killing two people and trampling homes, the national news agency said Sunday.
NEWS
April 5, 1989 | From Reuters
A herd of rogue elephants has killed eight people, destroyed 120 houses and spread terror in central India, the Hindustan Times reported Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2012 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
A judge on Tuesday harshly criticized the Los Angeles Zoo for its care and housing of elephants and ordered changes to improve the animals' welfare, but also found that the treatment did not amount to abuse and the exhibit can remain open. "This case raises the question of whether the recreational or perhaps educational needs of one intelligent mammal species outweigh the physical and emotional, if not survival, needs of another," Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge John L. Segal wrote in his 56-page opinion.
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The Greater Los Angeles Zoo Assn. sponsors a tour of Thailand that's heavy on wildlife viewing in out-of-the-way national parks and animal sanctuaries. L.A. Zoo director John Lewis takes visitors on foot, by Jeep, long-tail boat and even kayak to see elephants , Malayan sun bears, leopards, tigers , Javan mongoose, gibbons, langurs and other indigenous animals. Trip highlights include visits to Kaeng Krachan National Park, a lightly touristed area that's home to many animals and birds; Pa La-U, a tiered waterfall where elephants hang out; Klong Seant Wildlife Sanctuary and Doi Inthanon Cloud Forest, each known for being home to numerous species of birds and orchids; and a camp where guests may feed and interact with elephants.
WORLD
May 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A Seoul eatery trampled by elephants that escaped from a zoo last month is back in business and aiming to capitalize on the pachyderm pandemonium. The Korean barbecue restaurant, closed for a month for repairs, reopened with a new name: Restaurant Where Elephants Have Been. Owner Keum Taek Hoon said she used $18,000 in insurance money to remodel her eatery. The most popular item is the "elephant set" -- seven vegetable side dishes and a hot soup. "What can I say about the elephants?
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