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May 29, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it morally defensible to ignore the last wishes of a national hero if there is a chance of re-creating a flash of his genius? Listen to the music. But beware: Sour notes echo from the audience. As he lay dying of cancer in 1933, Edward W. Elgar, the great English composer, worried about his unfinished Third Symphony. "Don't let anyone tinker with it. . . . No one could understand," he told his daughter Clarice and friend W.H. Reed, head of the London Symphony, according to Reed's written account of the bedside conversation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
What do we do with the Duke? He was, most agree, the greatest jazz composer who ever lived. And more. Duke Ellington was the soul of American music. David Schiff has just written a brilliantly illuminating book, "The Ellington Century," that places the Duke at the center of it all. Academic Ellington studies are extensive. Terry Teachout has an Ellington biography on the way. And yet Ellington remains an outsider. A handful of his compositions are standards. But his large-scale symphonic works, his opera, his this and his that - he broke boundaries - are significant rarities.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Before conducting the Colburn Orchestra at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Sunday night, across the street from the newly renamed Colburn Way (one block of 2nd Street), the renowned British conductor Neville Marriner was handed the Richard D. Colburn Award in a small ceremony on stage. Marriner was the first music director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, which Richard D. Colburn, Los Angeles' legendary music benefactor, helped bankroll. The concert was presented by the Colburn School in honor of the centenary of its founder, who died at 92 in 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Before conducting the Colburn Orchestra at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Sunday night, across the street from the newly renamed Colburn Way (one block of 2nd Street), the renowned British conductor Neville Marriner was handed the Richard D. Colburn Award in a small ceremony on stage. Marriner was the first music director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, which Richard D. Colburn, Los Angeles' legendary music benefactor, helped bankroll. The concert was presented by the Colburn School in honor of the centenary of its founder, who died at 92 in 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
In certain quarters, Edward Elgar's "The Dream of Gerontius" is regarded as something of a national monument. The grandiose oratorio, completed in 1900, may strike a few callous or unchauvinistic souls as a quaint Victorian relic. Nevertheless, as long as there's an England, Elgar's lofty rhetoric--aligned with his meandering Wagnerism and prim piety--will be ardently admired and fiercely defended.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1991 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Survivors of Tuesday's deadly massacre at a San Diego electronics company remember the afternoon attack in snippets. There was the clang of the fire alarm, which went off shortly after 2:15 p.m. when Larry T. Hansel, a former employee who had been laid off in March, entered the Elgar Corp. headquarters and exploded two homemade bombs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1987
Martin Bernheimer is right on the mark in his sober, clear-sighted assessment of the Andre Previn regime at the Philharmonic ("A Problematic Partnership," May 10). I don't long for the Brahms-laden Carlo Maria Giulini years, but the Previn stewardship of our most valuable musical resource is proving to be a big disappointment. The constant programming of music by the likes of Vaughn Williams and Elgar has become a joke in my circle of music-loving friends. There's not enough Mahler and the Mozart conducting I've heard has been mediocre or worse.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2009 | MARK SWED, MUSIC CRITIC
Tuesday was meant as a night of Englishness. Bramwell Tovey -- the principal guest conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl and an affably avuncular Brit ever-ready with a quip for the audience -- was in excellent form. Elgar's "Pomp and Circumstance" March No. 1, broadly played, evoked the land of hope and glory (as well as graduation). Ralph Vaughan Williams' "The Lark Ascending," for violin and orchestra, a perfect pastoral, featured concertmaster Martin Chalifour.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Last week at the Hollywood Bowl, the hyperkinetic British conductor Roger Norrington performed Mahler and Beethoven like a house on fire. Tuesday night, another well-known British maestro offered an antidote. It is unfair to Jeffrey Tate to think him poky, but he was evidently in an expansive mood with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. There are many kinds of slow.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
What do we do with the Duke? He was, most agree, the greatest jazz composer who ever lived. And more. Duke Ellington was the soul of American music. David Schiff has just written a brilliantly illuminating book, "The Ellington Century," that places the Duke at the center of it all. Academic Ellington studies are extensive. Terry Teachout has an Ellington biography on the way. And yet Ellington remains an outsider. A handful of his compositions are standards. But his large-scale symphonic works, his opera, his this and his that - he broke boundaries - are significant rarities.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2009 | MARK SWED, MUSIC CRITIC
Tuesday was meant as a night of Englishness. Bramwell Tovey -- the principal guest conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl and an affably avuncular Brit ever-ready with a quip for the audience -- was in excellent form. Elgar's "Pomp and Circumstance" March No. 1, broadly played, evoked the land of hope and glory (as well as graduation). Ralph Vaughan Williams' "The Lark Ascending," for violin and orchestra, a perfect pastoral, featured concertmaster Martin Chalifour.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Prior to this past weekend, the only place where one could catch Bramwell Tovey in action with the Los Angeles Philharmonic was the Hollywood Bowl, with its capricious sound, long-distance views and populist programming. Yet even there, one could tell that this late-blooming British conductor had an excellent rapport with this orchestra -- and his appearance within the closer, friendlier acoustical space of the Walt Disney Concert Hall on Saturday night clinched the deal.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2001 | ANTHONY E. ANDERSON
Daniel Cariaga, a music critic at The Times, does not much care for the symphonies of Edward Elgar. Witness these excerpts taken from his reviews over the years: * First Symphony [May 6, 1995]: "Given the work's laissez-faire structure, ambitious but uninspired melodies and paucity of interesting musical ideas, the early leavers of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion could hardly be chastised."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The Los Angeles Philharmonic got lucky over the weekend. It happened to have scheduled Elgar's affecting Cello Concerto. Written in 1919 but once thought a dated relic of a British composer's Edwardian visions, it was given a new lease on life in the hip 1960s by Jacqueline Du Pre. And now it has another, thanks to its appearance in the prurient film "Hilary and Jackie," which scrutinizes the cellist's life.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Last week at the Hollywood Bowl, the hyperkinetic British conductor Roger Norrington performed Mahler and Beethoven like a house on fire. Tuesday night, another well-known British maestro offered an antidote. It is unfair to Jeffrey Tate to think him poky, but he was evidently in an expansive mood with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. There are many kinds of slow.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1998 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Like a doomed dirigible, Edward Elgar's massive Second Symphony seems a viable vehicle until it attempts to rise. Conducted skillfully by podium guest Mark Elder--countryman of the composer--and played with brave but forced enthusiasm by the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the 87-year-old work returned to the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion of the Music Center Thursday night and failed to thrill.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2001 | ANTHONY E. ANDERSON
Daniel Cariaga, a music critic at The Times, does not much care for the symphonies of Edward Elgar. Witness these excerpts taken from his reviews over the years: * First Symphony [May 6, 1995]: "Given the work's laissez-faire structure, ambitious but uninspired melodies and paucity of interesting musical ideas, the early leavers of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion could hardly be chastised."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1992 | CAROLE SUGARMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
The attorney for the man who has admitted killing two executives at the Elgar Corp. a year ago said Tuesday his client drove to the electronics firm prepared for war because he believed that his former bosses were conspirators involved with the Antichrist and an impending nuclear war. Alex Loebig Jr. told a nine-woman, three-man San Diego Superior Court jury in Larry T.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Perhaps it's just millennial blues, but we seem to be having a bit more trouble than usual letting go of our century's favorite figures. Browsing in a book store the other day, for instance, I noticed a new mystery novel in which Groucho Marx is, with full permission of the Groucho estate, the detective.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1998 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Once upon a time, back in the 1980s before Baroque singers marketed themselves as bimbos, before nubile young violinists posed for provocative CD covers, there were Nige and Nadja, the original bad boy and bad girl of the violin. First there was Nigel Kennedy the good boy. In 1984, still in his 20s, he recorded Elgar's outsize, rapturous 1910 Violin Concerto in a performance that spoke directly to traditionalist hearts. It was beautifully played, well controlled yet full of emotion.
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