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Eliane Elias

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January 13, 2009 | Randy Lewis; Mikael Wood; August Brown
Otis Gibbs "Grandpa Walked a Picketline" Wanamaker *** Otis Gibbs is an old-school troubadour out of Wanamaker, Ind., who sounds only too happy to pick up the mantle of Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger in championing the working stiff and blue-collar America in song. On "Grandpa Walked a Picketline," due Jan. 20, he sings of everyday folks, not always the desperate or destitute, but the overlooked and underappreciated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2009 | Randy Lewis; Mikael Wood; August Brown
Otis Gibbs "Grandpa Walked a Picketline" Wanamaker *** Otis Gibbs is an old-school troubadour out of Wanamaker, Ind., who sounds only too happy to pick up the mantle of Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger in championing the working stiff and blue-collar America in song. On "Grandpa Walked a Picketline," due Jan. 20, he sings of everyday folks, not always the desperate or destitute, but the overlooked and underappreciated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
Eliane Elias, the pianist from Sao Paulo who arrived in this country 12 years ago, revealed in a concert Thursday at Ambassador Auditorium how much headway she has made since her early days here, when she toured with the fusion group Steps Ahead. Elias today has a powerful dual personality. While a Latin rhythmic character remains prominent in her performances of Brazilian tunes, some of the American standards played Thursday reveal the extent to which she has moved into the jazz mainstream.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2006 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Eliane Elias hasn't been heard often enough in the Southland. And her previous recent appearance, a relatively brief set last summer at the Hollywood Bowl in a tribute to Antonio Carlos Jobim, was obscured by unnecessarily distracting orchestral accompaniment. So it was particularly pleasant to hear the gifted Brazilian pianist and singer in a far more intimate setting Sunday afternoon at the Rising Jazz Stars Foundation in Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They seem made for each other: Brazilian-born keyboardist Eliane Elias (pronounced ill-ee-AH-nee ill-EE-us ) and the music of her fellow countryman, Antonio Carlos Jobim. But Elias' latest album of the composer's tunes is no exercise in south-of-the-border rhythms and moods, but a formidable jazz outing that doesn't exploit the usual samba format. "The idea was to do something different, something other people haven't done," the pianist said earlier this week from San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Eliane Elias hasn't needed the force of an earthquake to break down the glass ceilings and stylistic barriers of the music business. In the last decade, the Brazilian pianist/composer has convincingly demonstrated her skills in the still sometimes macho world of jazz improvisation. It wasn't always easy. When she first came to New York in 1981, "I had to work very hard," she said recently in a phone conversation from her New York City home.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
Sa~o Paulo-born pianist Eliane Elias has been demonstrating the true global character of jazz for more than a decade. Her recordings and live performances have revealed a first-rate artist, fully adept in all the sophisticated aspects of modern jazz. But Elias' performance at El Camino's Marsee Auditorium on Saturday night only intermittently rose to her usual high level of accomplishment. She was at her best during the unaccompanied segments.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
Emily Remler shatters every preconception about jazz. Young, petite, attractive and female, she is as far from the stereotypical image of the jazz musician as the Rev. Jesse Jackson is from the icons of the political past. But images can be deceiving. Remler, a guitarist in the mainstream tradition, has the chops to play along with anyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2006 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Eliane Elias hasn't been heard often enough in the Southland. And her previous recent appearance, a relatively brief set last summer at the Hollywood Bowl in a tribute to Antonio Carlos Jobim, was obscured by unnecessarily distracting orchestral accompaniment. So it was particularly pleasant to hear the gifted Brazilian pianist and singer in a far more intimate setting Sunday afternoon at the Rising Jazz Stars Foundation in Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
What a fascinating week for jazz--especially distaff jazz. Ella Fitzgerald working her familiar magic at the Hollywood Bowl; mainstream guitarist Emily Remler at the Vine St. Bar & Grill, and now--at least as exciting as both of the above--Brazilian pianist Eliane Elias at Catalina Bar and Grill. Elias' opening performance Thursday night was startling.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
Sa~o Paulo-born pianist Eliane Elias has been demonstrating the true global character of jazz for more than a decade. Her recordings and live performances have revealed a first-rate artist, fully adept in all the sophisticated aspects of modern jazz. But Elias' performance at El Camino's Marsee Auditorium on Saturday night only intermittently rose to her usual high level of accomplishment. She was at her best during the unaccompanied segments.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
Eliane Elias, the pianist from Sao Paulo who arrived in this country 12 years ago, revealed in a concert Thursday at Ambassador Auditorium how much headway she has made since her early days here, when she toured with the fusion group Steps Ahead. Elias today has a powerful dual personality. While a Latin rhythmic character remains prominent in her performances of Brazilian tunes, some of the American standards played Thursday reveal the extent to which she has moved into the jazz mainstream.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Eliane Elias hasn't needed the force of an earthquake to break down the glass ceilings and stylistic barriers of the music business. In the last decade, the Brazilian pianist/composer has convincingly demonstrated her skills in the still sometimes macho world of jazz improvisation. It wasn't always easy. When she first came to New York in 1981, "I had to work very hard," she said recently in a phone conversation from her New York City home.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The divergence of styles among the latest generation of jazz keyboardists was on display Sunday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. The pairing of Eliane Elias' acoustic trio and Bobby Lyle's mostly-electric quintet pointed out the vast array of influences and backgrounds that today's pianists can pull from when forming their own outfits. Elias grew up with a heavy exposure to jazz and classical music while surrounded by dance rhythms of her native Brazil.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They seem made for each other: Brazilian-born keyboardist Eliane Elias (pronounced ill-ee-AH-nee ill-EE-us ) and the music of her fellow countryman, Antonio Carlos Jobim. But Elias' latest album of the composer's tunes is no exercise in south-of-the-border rhythms and moods, but a formidable jazz outing that doesn't exploit the usual samba format. "The idea was to do something different, something other people haven't done," the pianist said earlier this week from San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
What a fascinating week for jazz--especially distaff jazz. Ella Fitzgerald working her familiar magic at the Hollywood Bowl; mainstream guitarist Emily Remler at the Vine St. Bar & Grill, and now--at least as exciting as both of the above--Brazilian pianist Eliane Elias at Catalina Bar and Grill. Elias' opening performance Thursday night was startling.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The divergence of styles among the latest generation of jazz keyboardists was on display Sunday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. The pairing of Eliane Elias' acoustic trio and Bobby Lyle's mostly-electric quintet pointed out the vast array of influences and backgrounds that today's pianists can pull from when forming their own outfits. Elias grew up with a heavy exposure to jazz and classical music while surrounded by dance rhythms of her native Brazil.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1996
The starting time for jazz pianist Eliane Elias' appearance Friday at Borders Books, 1360 Westwood Blvd. in Westwood, has been changed. Elias will perform at 6:30 p.m. Information: (310) 475-4444.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
Emily Remler shatters every preconception about jazz. Young, petite, attractive and female, she is as far from the stereotypical image of the jazz musician as the Rev. Jesse Jackson is from the icons of the political past. But images can be deceiving. Remler, a guitarist in the mainstream tradition, has the chops to play along with anyone.
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