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Elias Hrawi

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Elias Hrawi, 80, who as president rebuilt Lebanon after a 15-year civil war but also helped Syria take over his country, died of cancer Friday at the American University of Beirut hospital, where he had been receiving treatment for a chronic illness in recent weeks, a senior Lebanese official said. A sharp-tongued, energetic Maronite Catholic, Hrawi was elected by parliament to a six-year term in 1989.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Elias Hrawi, 80, who as president rebuilt Lebanon after a 15-year civil war but also helped Syria take over his country, died of cancer Friday at the American University of Beirut hospital, where he had been receiving treatment for a chronic illness in recent weeks, a senior Lebanese official said. A sharp-tongued, energetic Maronite Catholic, Hrawi was elected by parliament to a six-year term in 1989.
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NEWS
November 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Elias Hrawi is taking steps to bankrupt militia factions as part of a strategy to end Lebanon's 15-year civil war. The Syrian-backed government is seeking to regain control of 12 Mediterranean ports used for years by Christian and Muslim forces to siphon off customs duties, import weapons and ship goods.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Elias Hrawi is taking steps to bankrupt militia factions as part of a strategy to end Lebanon's 15-year civil war. The Syrian-backed government is seeking to regain control of 12 Mediterranean ports used for years by Christian and Muslim forces to siphon off customs duties, import weapons and ship goods.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Muslims and Christians loyal to President Elias Hrawi struck to protest at what they see as defiant Christian Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun's plan to partition Lebanon. Banks, stores, schools and businesses closed across three-quarters of the country outside the Aoun-controlled Christian enclave. Hrawi has threatened to resign if Aoun does not capitulate, accept his authority and vacate the shell-scarred presidential palace in the East Beirut suburb of Baabda.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lebanon's President Elias Hrawi met with Syrian President Hafez Assad to discuss his plans after the toppling of rebel Christian Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun. Hrawi was greeted in Damascus by Assad and a 21-gun salute. Syrian officials said talks focused on plans to disband militias, form a new government and free southern Lebanon from Israeli occupation. Lebanese government officials said the seven existing militias, estimated to number 40,000 men, will be disbanded within six months.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
Christian army commander Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun rejected an ultimatum to leave the presidential palace and said Monday that he would die fighting. Aoun told a news conference in his bunker beneath the shell-battered palace east of Beirut that he is recruiting volunteers to meet a possible assault by the 40,000 Syrian soldiers stationed in Lebanon.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
An Iranian-backed fundamentalist group linked to the holding of Western hostages said Saturday that it had thwarted an attempt to assassinate its mentor. A car rigged with 200 pounds of TNT was parked off the road that Sheik Mohammed Hussein Fadlallah takes daily from his house to Beir el Abed mosque in Beirut's southern slums, said a statement by Hezbollah, or Party of God. Police said the bomb-laden car was set to be detonated by remote control.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lebanese President Elias Hrawi on Sunday gave Christian commander Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun 48 hours to join his new reconciliation government, and a showdown appeared increasingly likely as the embattled army chief vowed to resist.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Chouaifete, a Druze town in the mountains about 6 1/2 miles south of central Beirut, the word on virtually everyone's lips these days is istinfaar , Arabic for "on the alert." The reason: President Elias Hrawi's determination to extend his authority over all Beirut, including Baabda, the Beirut suburb where the maverick Christian Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun is headquartered just south of Chouaifete. Chouaifete has been in the front line of the war in Lebanon since it erupted in 1975.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Militiamen began pulling out of Beirut on Saturday on the first day of a phased plan to extend the government's authority over the Lebanese capital after 15 years of civil war. Witnesses said scores of Shiite Muslim Amal gunmen were seen leaving for southern Lebanon with artillery, mortars and heavy machine guns. "We will complete our withdrawal from all of Beirut today (Saturday).. . . Not a single bullet will remain in the city.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lebanon's President Elias Hrawi met with Syrian President Hafez Assad to discuss his plans after the toppling of rebel Christian Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun. Hrawi was greeted in Damascus by Assad and a 21-gun salute. Syrian officials said talks focused on plans to disband militias, form a new government and free southern Lebanon from Israeli occupation. Lebanese government officials said the seven existing militias, estimated to number 40,000 men, will be disbanded within six months.
NEWS
October 15, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the rubbled forecourt of Lebanon's presidential palace at Baabda, Syrian troops Sunday heated coffee over a fire fueled with shredded posters of fallen Christian strongman Michel Aoun. The flag of Damascus flew over the Lebanese Defense Ministry in nearby Yarze, and for the first time in 12 years, Syrian soldiers patrolled the streets of East Beirut, capital of the Christian heartland.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christian strongman Michel Aoun, whose quest for power in Beirut soaked the Lebanese capital in blood for nearly two years, gave up the fight Saturday and received asylum from France. The former Lebanese army commander ordered his loyal troops to support President Elias Hrawi, head of the Syrian-backed central government whose legitimacy the diminutive general had rejected.
NEWS
April 6, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lebanese President Elias Hrawi vowed Thursday to extend his authority into his nation's embattled Christian heartland by dispatching troops from his half of the Lebanese army. The mainly Muslim units are not expected to take part in the fighting that has set Christian against Christian since late January. Instead, they will take over barracks captured from the forces of renegade Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun, who controls the other half of the army.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
An Iranian-backed fundamentalist group linked to the holding of Western hostages said Saturday that it had thwarted an attempt to assassinate its mentor. A car rigged with 200 pounds of TNT was parked off the road that Sheik Mohammed Hussein Fadlallah takes daily from his house to Beir el Abed mosque in Beirut's southern slums, said a statement by Hezbollah, or Party of God. Police said the bomb-laden car was set to be detonated by remote control.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Militiamen began pulling out of Beirut on Saturday on the first day of a phased plan to extend the government's authority over the Lebanese capital after 15 years of civil war. Witnesses said scores of Shiite Muslim Amal gunmen were seen leaving for southern Lebanon with artillery, mortars and heavy machine guns. "We will complete our withdrawal from all of Beirut today (Saturday).. . . Not a single bullet will remain in the city.
NEWS
April 6, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lebanese President Elias Hrawi vowed Thursday to extend his authority into his nation's embattled Christian heartland by dispatching troops from his half of the Lebanese army. The mainly Muslim units are not expected to take part in the fighting that has set Christian against Christian since late January. Instead, they will take over barracks captured from the forces of renegade Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun, who controls the other half of the army.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Muslims and Christians loyal to President Elias Hrawi struck to protest at what they see as defiant Christian Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun's plan to partition Lebanon. Banks, stores, schools and businesses closed across three-quarters of the country outside the Aoun-controlled Christian enclave. Hrawi has threatened to resign if Aoun does not capitulate, accept his authority and vacate the shell-scarred presidential palace in the East Beirut suburb of Baabda.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Chouaifete, a Druze town in the mountains about 6 1/2 miles south of central Beirut, the word on virtually everyone's lips these days is istinfaar , Arabic for "on the alert." The reason: President Elias Hrawi's determination to extend his authority over all Beirut, including Baabda, the Beirut suburb where the maverick Christian Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun is headquartered just south of Chouaifete. Chouaifete has been in the front line of the war in Lebanon since it erupted in 1975.
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